175 results

Product Type

Condition

Binding

Collectible Attributes

Seller Location

Seller Rating

  • Saunders, J. B. deC. M.

    Published by University of California. 1971. Davis, California., 1971

    Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
    Contact seller

    Seller Rating: 5-star rating

    Book

    US$ 5.00 Shipping

    Within U.S.A.

    Quantity: 1

    Add to Basket

    Soft cover. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Wrappers. Illustrations are the frontispiece of Alexander von Humboldt, 1814, and a copy of the Hydrographic Scale of the River and Rains at Sacramento, Cal., January, 1857. 750 copies composed and printed for Library Associates by the University of California Printing Department, Berkeley, September, 1971. From the Foreword: "Dr. Saunders' lecture deals with one of his many areas of interest -- the influence of Baron Alexander von Humboldt on several of the early California physicians. Baron von Humboldt believed that man's biological adjustment ot his environment, rather than the historical past or cultural traditions, will determine the future. The popularizing of his interpretations fostered Western expansionism in the United States" .

    Seller Inventory # 3066

  • Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
    Contact seller

    Seller Rating: 5-star rating

    Manuscript / Paper Collectible

    US$ 5.00 Shipping

    Within U.S.A.

    Quantity: 1

    Add to Basket

    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original black and white photo postcard. No date, circa 1920s-1930s. 5 1/2" x 3 1/2." Title printed at the bottom of the image. Imprint of "Zan 222" in the lower-right corner of the image. Postcard is unused. Postcard is very clean and intact overall except for a few small wrinkles. A Very Good copy. This postcard shows the scenic landscape of a California valley as viewed from the St. Helena Sanitarium in the community of Sanitarium, California. The community of Sanitarium was founded in 1878 by Seventh-day Adventists and was originally called Crystal Springs. There, they opened a sanitarium that was originally called the Rural Health Retreat at Crystal Springs. This sanitarium would eventually become the St. Helena Sanitarium. Today, the St. Helena Sanitarium is the St. Helena Hospital.

    Seller Inventory # 022495

  • Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
    Contact seller

    Seller Rating: 5-star rating

    Manuscript / Paper Collectible

    US$ 5.00 Shipping

    Within U.S.A.

    Quantity: 1

    Add to Basket

    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original black and white photo postcard with sepia tones. Postmarked November 17, 1930 in Sanitarium, California. 5 1/2" x 3 1/2." Title printed at the bottom of the image. A red, two-cent George Washington stamp is tipped in on the back. Postcard is used. Postcard is very clean and intact overall except for slight wear at corners and edges. A Very Good copy. This postcard shows the St. Helena Sanitarium in the community of Sanitarium, California. The community of Sanitarium was founded in 1878 by Seventh-day Adventists and was originally called Crystal Springs. There, they opened a sanitarium that was originally called the Rural Health Retreat at Crystal Springs. This sanitarium would eventually become the St. Helena Sanitarium. Today, the St. Helena Sanitarium is the St. Helena Hospital. "J. B. O." writes to "Dr. Geo. Eaton Daniels" in San Francisco, California, "Dr. George, Am here for a week for a rest. Came for treatments, food, rooms, service very wonderful. Best wishes to you and your sunny assistant. J. B. O.".

    Seller Inventory # 022496

  • Seller image for Original Trade Card - "N. H. Shepherd, Druggist and Apothecary." for sale by Barry Cassidy Rare Books
    US$ 5.00 Shipping

    Within U.S.A.

    Quantity: 1

    Add to Basket

    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a black-and-white illustrated portrait of N. H .Shepherd. Circa 1882. 2 1/2" x 3 3/4." Trade card is very clean and intact. Slightly bumped corners. A Very Good copy. Title printed on front. Printed on the back are two testimonials that promote Hood's Sarsaparilla claiming that it cures catarrh and purifies the blood. Trade card for N. H. Shepherd, Druggist and Apothecary. The back advertises Dr. C. McLane's Liver Pills, likely one of the products Shepherd carried, and includes a testimonial dated September 20, 1882 in Myers, Florida from E. H. Giles. Giles claims that the liver pills work successfully as a "liver corrector" and vermifuge. Like many medicinal products of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the medicinal properties of these livers were questionable at best. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023169

  • Seller image for Original Trade Card - "C. I. Hood & Co." for sale by Barry Cassidy Rare Books
    US$ 5.00 Shipping

    Within U.S.A.

    Quantity: 1

    Add to Basket

    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of dogs on the front. Titled, "First Lesson," the illustration shows a mother or father dog instructing its three puppies how to catch a rat. The puppies look with attentive gazes at the rat trapped under their parent's paw. Circa 1890s. 4 3/4" x 3." Trade card is very clean and intact overall but there are pencil inscriptions on front and back and additions to the original illustration done in pencil (the parent dog is shown with an added smoking pipe in its mouth). A Good copy. Text on front: "Take Hood's Sarsaparilla; One Hundred Doses One Dollar." Printed on the back are two testimonials that promote Hood's Sarsaparilla claiming that it cures catarrh and purifies the blood. Trade card for C. I. Hood & Company based in Lowell, Massachusetts. C. I. Hood & Co. was founded in 1875 by Charles Ira Hood in Lowell. Hood offered a number of medicinal products that became popular during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Hood's products were eventually sold nationwide. His most famous product came to be Hood's Sarsaparilla. Despite their popularity, all of the company's products and their purported medicinal properties were questionable at best. In 1922, the business was sold by Hood's wife, Sarah, to William R. Warner & Co. following Hood's passing. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023168

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of a domestic scene showing two women, two children, and a dog at leisure in a bucolic setting. No date, 1890s. 5 1/2" x 2 3/4." Trade card is very clean and intact overall except for slight edge wear and a few small bits of paper from another material that got stuck (mostly limited to the back). A Very Good copy. Trade card for E. P. Brobeck, a druggist in Rochester, Pennsylvania. The card has two purple stamps from Brobeck on front and back. This card promotes one of the items Brobeck carried, Ayer's Sarsaparilla, as manufactured by J. C. Ayer & Company. J. C. Ayer & Co. was founded by James Cook Ayer (1818-1878) in Lowell, Massachusetts. Ayer opened his own apothecary in 1841. Based on online resources, it is estimated that Ayer's Sarsaparilla was first released between c. 1840 and c. 1855. The text on back lauds the sarsaparilla's purported medicinal properties including being a blood purifier. Like many medicines during this time, Ayer's Sarsaparilla's effectiveness as a medicine was questionable at best. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023184

  • US$ 5.00 Shipping

    Within U.S.A.

    Quantity: 1

    Add to Basket

    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of hand holding up a basket of white flowers. No date, circa 1880s-1910s. 3 1/2" x 2." Trade card is clean and intact overall except for a few spots on the back which may be dampstains; they minimally affect the front. A Very Good copy. Trade card for J. R. Gasaway, a drug store in West Bridgewater, Pennsylvania. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023244

  • US$ 5.00 Shipping

    Within U.S.A.

    Quantity: 1

    Add to Basket

    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of hand holding up a small basket of blue flowers. No date, circa 1880s-1910s. 3 1/2" x 2." Trade card is very clean and intact except for age toning and a few small marks on front. A Very Good copy. Trade card for J. R. Gasaway, a drug store in West Bridgewater, Pennsylvania. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023247

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of a winged cherub holding flowers in one hand and a basket of the same flowers in the other. No date, circa 1880s-1910s. 3" x 4 1/4." Trade card is very clean and intact except for slight age toning, a few faint marks on front and back, and almost imperceptible dampstaining on back. A Very Good copy. Trade card for Austen's Forest Flower Cologne by W. J. Austen & Company in Oswego, New York and dealer O. E. Dunham in West Eaton, New York. The front highlights the main product advertised, Austen's Forest Flower Cologne. W. J. Austen & Co.'s location also listed on front. The back has other promotional text including a description of the dealer, additional information about the Cologne, and "Swageh or Oswego Bitters," a medicinal tonic and patent medicine by W. J. Austen & Co. Patent medicines are medicinal products whose healing or curative properties are questionable at best. Historically, many were actually dangerous and contained unsafe levels of alcohol and undisclosed substances such as narcotics. The history of patent medicines in United States begins at its inception but it was not until the years leading up to the Civil War that they became popular. Despite the misleading and even dangerous nature of patent medicines, they achieved peak popularity during the latter half of the nineteenth century. Around the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Progressive movements led by journalists, watchdog groups, and legislators began to stem the tide of patent medicines. 1906 marked the passing of the first federal Food and Drug Act which required medicinal products to disclose their active ingredients, be accurately labeled, and not fall below certain purity levels set by the U.S. Pharmacopeia and National Formulary. Subsequent legislation over the years helped solidify food and drug safety measures that made it difficult for misleading and dangerous medicines to reach the general public. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023330

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of a winged cherub holding flowers in one hand and a basket of the same flowers in the other. No date, circa 1880s-1910s. 3" x 4 1/4." Trade card is very clean and intact except for slight age toning and a few tiny dots on front and back. A Very Good copy. Trade card for Austen's Forest Flower Cologne by W. J. Austen & Company and dealer Abel Comstock. W. J. Austen & Co. was based in Oswego, New York. Abel Comstock was based in Smyrna, New York. The main product advertised on front is Austen's Forest Flower Cologne. The back has other promotional text including a description of the dealer, additional information about the Cologne, and "Swageh or Oswego Bitters," a medicinal tonic and patent medicine. Patent medicines are medicinal products whose healing or curative properties are questionable at best. Historically, many were actually dangerous and contained unsafe levels of alcohol and undisclosed substances such as narcotics. The history of patent medicines in United States begins at its inception but it was not until the years leading up to the Civil War that they became popular. Despite the misleading and even dangerous nature of patent medicines, they achieved peak popularity during the latter half of the nineteenth century. Around the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Progressive movements led by journalists, watchdog groups, and legislators began to stem the tide of patent medicines. 1906 marked the passing of the first federal Food and Drug Act which required medicinal products to disclose their active ingredients, be accurately labeled, and not fall below certain purity levels set by the U.S. Pharmacopeia and National Formulary. Subsequent legislation over the years helped solidify food and drug safety measures that made it difficult for misleading and dangerous medicines to reach the general public. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023329

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Good. Original trade card with a black-and-white illustration of young child with the caption, "Our Pet." Illustration is accented by pink text and pink coloring to the child's bow. No date, circa 1880s-1910s. 3" x 4 3/4." Trade card is very clean and intact overall. Slight rippling. Back has bits of paper that are stuck and some discoloration. Front is Very Good, but including the back, a Good copy overall. Printer's information at bottom: "The Major & Knapp Lith. Co. N.Y." Trade card for dealers Javens & Danals and one of the products they carry, Horsford's Acid Phosphate, which was manufactured by Rumford Chemical Works. This brand of acid phosphate was made by Eben Horsford (1818-1893), a Harvard University professor. He and George F. Wilson founded Rumford Chemical Works which was incorporated in 1854. Promotional text on back advertises the acid phosphate's purported medicinal properties. Among the ailments the product is said to cure are "Dyspepsia, Indigestion, Headache, Mental & Physical Exhaustion, Nervousness, Hysteria, Night Sweats of Consumption, etc." Patent medicines, products with no medicinal properties despite being advertised as such, proliferated during the latter half of the nineteenth century. While Horsford's Acid Phosphate is a patent medicine, it found a new lease on life as a flavoring compound in sodas and other drinks. Acid phosphate is described as having a sour taste with no other flavor notes. Acid phosphate is still sold to this day but typically as a flavoring, not a medicine. Major & Knapp is one of the iterations of the company whose founders and partners include Henry B. Major (1820-1887), Richard Major (1825-1894), Joseph F. Knapp (1832-1891), and Joseph P. Knapp (1864-1954). Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023352

  • US$ 5.00 Shipping

    Within U.S.A.

    Quantity: 1

    Add to Basket

    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card featuring a color illustration of a man who appears under the weather with a friend who recommends that he try Parker's Tonic. No date, circa 1880s-1890s. 4 1/2" x 3. " Trade card is very clean and intact except for slight age toning and a few faint spots of discoloration. A Very Good copy. Trade card advertising Parker's Tonic, a panacea that has "[w]onderful cures of Rheumatism, Nervousness and Kidney Complaint ." Text on the back further promotes the tonic and also advertises another product, Parker's Hair Balsam. Parker's Tonic and Parker's Hair Balsam were exclusively manufactured by Hiscox & Company which was founded by David Hiscox in New York. The tonic is an example of a patent medicine, a medicinal product with questionable health benefits and curative properties at best, which proliferated during the late nineteenth century. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023405

  • US$ 5.00 Shipping

    Within U.S.A.

    Quantity: 1

    Add to Basket

    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card on gray paper with an illustration printed in purple ink on front and text printed in black ink on back. No date, circa 1880s-1910s. 4 1/2" x 3. " Trade card is very clean and intact except for minuscule corner and edge wear and a couple microscopic stains. A Very Good copy. Trade card advertising Parker's Hair Balsam, a hair "dressing" that supposedly restores the color of graying hair. The illustration shows a couple sitting in front of a mantle, the portrait of an older-looking man being the focal point. The wife says to her husband, Gus, that she would have never married him had he looked like the man in the portrait. The portrait is of Gus. Gus sits besides her, having used Parker's Hair Balsam, and looks noticeably younger. He comments on how the balsam saved him from looking like "that venerable-looking old man on the wall." Text on the back further promotes the balsam and also advertises another product, Floreston Cologne. Parker's Hair Balsam and Floreston Cologne were exclusively manufactured by Hiscox & Company which was founded by David Hiscox in New York. The balsam is an example of a patent medicine, a medicinal product with questionable health benefits and curative properties at best, which proliferated during the late nineteenth century. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023403

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card featuring a stately portrait of a man illustrated in black-and-white. The title is printed under the portrait. No date, circa 1882 (testimonial dated 1882). 3" x 4 1/2." Trade card is very clean and intact except for slight corner and edge wear and light rubbing on front. A Very Good copy. Trade card promoting the general store, C. W. Dexter & Bro. Their main selling point is that they carry Dr. C. McLane's Liver Pills and Vermifuge, both of which might be considered patent medicines. Patent medicines are medicinal products with questionable curative properties that were popular during the late nineteenth century. According to the testimonial printed on back, McLane's Liver Pills are a "bile remover and liver corrector." The testimonial also promotes Dr. C. McLane's Vermifuge. Toward the bottom on back is the address of the Fleming Brothers, who manufactured Dr. C. McLane products. Dr. Charles McLane was an actual physician (1790-1898?) whose was well-respected by his peers and ran a successful medical practice. In 1844, he sold the rights for his signature Liver Pills to Jonathan Kidd, a fellow pharmacist. Kidd then began manufacturing McLane's famous pills. About a year later, Kidd partnered with John Fleming, a pharmacist and drugstore owner, and the company was renamed Jonathan Kidd & Co. After Kidd passed away in 1853, John's brother, Cochrane Fleming, joined the business. The new name was Fleming Bros. & Co. They became the exclusive manufacturers of McLane's medicines and became a prominent business. Trade cards are antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023410

  • US$ 5.00 Shipping

    Within U.S.A.

    Quantity: 1

    Add to Basket

    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card featuring a black-and-white illustration of the "Great East River Bridge," which received its more famous moniker, the Brooklyn Bridge, in 1915. Fun facts about the bridge are printed below the illustration. An illustrated sign has been added to the underside of the bridge naming the advertised product. No date, circa 1873-1906. 4" x 2 1/2." Trade card is very clean and intact overall except for slight wrinkling and a few spots of discoloration on front and back. A Very Good copy. Trade card advertising Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound as sold by pharmacist W. B. Tobey in Syracuse, New York. In 1873, Lydia Estes Pinkham (1819-1883) invented her famous Vegetable Compound in her home in Lynn, Massachusetts. It was a combination of medicinal herbs and drinking alcohol. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound was much like other patent medicines that proliferated during the late nineteenth century in claiming to cure a host of ailments with little to no evidence and being questionable at best. However, Pinkham's Vegetable Compound was unique in that it was not only invented by a woman but also catered towards women's health. The main selling point of Pinkham's Vegetable Compound was alleviating menstrual and menopausal symptoms. An excerpt on the back details its supposed uses, "A Positive Cure For all those painful Complaints and Weaknesses so common to our best female population. It will cure entirely the worst form of Female Complaints, all Ovarian troubles, Inflammation and Ulceration, Falling and Displacements, and the consequent Spinal Weakness, and is particularly adapted to the Change of Life." The description also claims to cure "cancerous tumors . faintness, flatulency . Nervous Prostration, General Debility, Sleeplessness, Depression and Indigestion." Also promoted on back are Lydia E. Pinkham's Liver Pills, which claim to "cure constipation, biliousness, and torpidity of the liver." Pinkham's Vegetable Compound became very popular due to an involved marketing campaign and reassurance that Pinkham, being a woman, understood and knew how to treat women's ailments. Eventually, the 1906 Pure Food and Drug Act led to the demise of the Vegetable Compound. By 1906, the alcohol content in the Vegetable Compound had been reduced, but it still contained a whopping fifteen percent which now had to be disclosed. The act also required that products no longer print specious claims about their curative properties, thus ending the Vegetable Compound's successful marketing campaign. However, the products under the Pinkham brand remained popular, and the Lydia E. Pinkham Medicine Company stayed in business until 1968 when it was sold to Cooper Laboratories. As recent as the early twenty-first century, products based off the original Vegetable Compound were still available for purchase in pharmacies albeit with no alcohol. Trade cards are antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023414

  • US$ 5.00 Shipping

    Within U.S.A.

    Quantity: 1

    Add to Basket

    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Fine. Original trade card featuring color illustrations of two young girls holding a fan and apple in a bright, jubilant scene filled with flowers. The back includes a couple half-tone illustrations of pastoral, domestic scenes with people. 3" x 4 1/2." Printer's information on back: "Donaldson Brothers, N.Y." Trade card is very clean and intact except for a small bump in the upper-left corner and slight wear along the crease where the card can be folded. A Fine copy. Trade card promoting Alexander's Tonic Pills, a patent medicine manufactured by the Alexander Medicine Company. The description on back claims the pills cure "loss of appetite, leanness, nervousness, impoverished and impure blood, scrofula, constipation, indigestion, dyspepsia, biliousness, malaria," and a host of other ailments. Also advertised are Alexander's Ointment, Cholera Infatum Cure, Cholera Morbus Cure, and Ointment for Hemorrhoids, The Donaldson Brothers were a prominent lithography and printing company that was in business from 1872-1891. In 1891, Donaldson Bros. were bought out by the American Lithographic Company. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023418

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Near Fine (Near Fi. Original trade card with a color illustration of young girl holding a basket of fruit. Features a gilt background. No date, circa 1880s. 2 3/4" x 3 3/4." Trade card is very clean and intact except for slight rubbing on front, a couple microscopic wrinkles, and a small bit of brown paper stuck to the back. A Near Fine copy. Trade card promoting Brown's (Jamaica) Ginger, a patent medicine manufactured by the company, Frederick Brown, which was founded by a drugstore owner of the same name. J. W. Ringo, a druggist in Parkville, Platte County, Missouri, is listed as one of the sellers carrying the Ginger. The text on back reads, "Brown's Ginger [has some loss of text from the original cut], the Genuine. Frederick Brown, Philadelphia. Established 1822. Is not a specific, but It will Comfort when Cold. It will Aid where Re-action is feared. It will Stimulate without doing harm. And when taken according to the directions given, will do Good in All Seasons. State Plainly, Frederick Brown, Philadelphia." Frederick Brown invented Jamaica Ginger in 1822. There may have been some truth to its purported ability to cure mild stomach upset, but its cure-all claims, common in patent medicines at the time, were dubious. Despite this, the company enjoyed much success and eventually carried a whole line of patent medicines. The business was handed down for two generations but closed in 1919 following consumer protection laws that called for safer food and drug regulations and the advent of the Prohibition era (Brown's Ginger had a high alcohol content). Trade cards are antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023435

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card featuring a comedic illustration rendered in blue and white that shows a man bathing in a pond, unseen, while two women are nearby. The illustration is titled, "Moses in the bulrushes." No date, circa 1880s. 4 1/4" x 2 1/2." Trade card is very clean and intact overall except for age toning, a few tiny wrinkles, and a few spots of discoloration on front and back. A Very Good copy. Trade card advertising Chillarine, Mexican Female Remedy and Dr. M. A. Simmon's Liver Medicine as sold by Hunt & Doss in Colorado City, Texas. Hunt & Doss was a store that carried drugs, medicines, and toiletries. Text on back promotes both medicines. Chillarine claims to cure chills, hence the name, and ailments unique to women's health (menstrual symptoms, etc.). Simmon's Liver Medicine is marketed as a cure-all to all sorts of diseases and health problems such as "Indigestion, Colic, Dyspepsia, Biliousness, Costiveness, . Foul Breath . Cholera, Yellow Fever, and all Malarial Diseases." Like other patent medicines of their time, both the Liver Medicine's and Chillarine's curative properties were dubious at best. The popularity of patent medicines waned following changes in public opinion and the work of watchdog groups which led to the passage of consumer protection acts. The first of these acts, the Pure Food and Drug Act, was passed in 1906 and ushered in a new period of company accountability and higher product safety standards. Trade cards are antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023432

  • US$ 5.00 Shipping

    Within U.S.A.

    Quantity: 1

    Add to Basket

    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of young girl holding plants, perhaps herbs, in her hand and in a basket. Features a gilt background. No date, circa 1880s. 2 3/4" x 4 1/4." Trade card is very clean and intact except for slight rubbing, minimal corner and edge wear, and a few spots of surface chipping on back. A Very Good copy. Trade card promoting Brown's Ginger, a patent medicine manufactured by the company, Frederick Brown, which was founded by a drugstore owner of the same name. Frederick Brown invented his Ginger product in 1822. There may have been some truth to its purported ability to cure mild stomach upset, but its other advertised claims that it could treat gout, rheumatism, dyspepsia, and cholera, among a host of other ailments, were dubious. Despite this, the company enjoyed much success and eventually carried a whole line of patent medicines. The business was handed down for two generations but closed in 1919 following consumer protection laws that called for safer food and drug regulations and the advent of the Prohibition era (Brown's Ginger had a high alcohol content). Trade cards are antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023427

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a black-and-white illustration showing the apparent torture patients undergo when visiting the dentist. An exam room is shown in disarray as a dentist comically tries to wrench something out of his patient's mouth. The dentist says, "Don't move. Somethings got to come out this time." No date, circa 1880s-1910s. 2 3/4" x 4 1/2." Trade card is very clean and intact except for age toning, a few light marks on front and back, and holograph corrections in black ink that have crossed out Frank J. Miller's name, "Miller" in "Sippel & Miller," and the "s" in "Merchant Tailors" to likely reflect a change in ownership in which Sippel is the sole proprietor. A Very Good copy. Trade card for Sippel & Miller, tailors in Buffalo, New York. The proprietors are listed as John G. Sippel and Frank J. Miller. Trade cards are antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023483

  • US$ 5.00 Shipping

    Within U.S.A.

    Quantity: 1

    Add to Basket

    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of songbird perched on a branch in a wintry landscape. Snow-covered houses are shown in the back. 5" x 3 1/2." Trade card is very clean and intact except for age toning on back and light smudges on front. A Very Good copy. Trade card promoting the product, "Pettijohn's California Breakfast Food." The back of the card shows a small black-and-white illustration of a California grizzly bear, a recurring image on Pettijohn products, and promotional text by the company discouraging the consumption and purchase of oatmeal. According to this text, titled, "The Oatmeal Superstition," oatmeal is not nutritious and not the healthiest food for people and animals. Pettijohn's adds another questionable claim, saying, "[C]racked or rolled wheat is the food for the nervous, studious, or housekeeping women and children .," thus suggesting that wheat is superior to oatmeal. No company is named but the product was likely manufactured by the Eli Pettijohn Cereal Company or the American Cereal Company. The history of Pettijohn's Breakfast Food begins with its founder, Eli Pettijohn. Pettijohn was a millwright who opened a flour mill called Richfield Mills around 1854 along Minnehaha Creek in Minnesota. It was around this time when he first came up with the idea for Pettijohn's Breakfast Food, a cereal made of rolled wheat. In 1876, Pettijohn moved from Minneapolis to San Francisco, California. He resumed his cereal business in 1877 by marketing his cereal as "Pettijohn's Rolled Wheat." After an apparent hiatus in business operations beginning in 1880, the company reopened in 1884. From about 1884 onward, "Pettijohn's Breakfast Food" joined a lineup of other brand names such as "Pettijohn's Breakfast Germs" and "Pettijohn's Breakfast Pearls." By 1890, Pettijohn's cereal was well-known in the western states. In 1892, Pettijohn joined at least two other business partners and the company was renamed, "Pettijohn's Manufacturing & Milling Company." It is unclear when the overlap of the Eli Pettijohn Cereal Company, American Cereal Company, and Quaker Oats Company begins but online resources suggest the period from about the 1890s to the early 1900s. Some sources state that Pettijohn's Breakfast Food was acquired by Quaker Oats in 1893, but the actual Pettijohn company may have remained open. It appears that Pettijohn sold his company to the American Cereal Company in the 1890s. Trade cards are antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, some trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023541

  • US$ 5.00 Shipping

    Within U.S.A.

    Quantity: 1

    Add to Basket

    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of a woman wearing a fancy pink dress and playing with her young child propped on her shoulders. They are in a serene landscape with grass, plants, and trees. The company implies that scenes like this one can result from using their product. No date, circa 1880s-1890s. 5" x 2 1/4." Trade card is very clean and intact except for slight age toning on back; slightly bumped corners; a few tiny spots on front; and a small, faint dampstain in the lower-left corner. A Very Good copy. Trade card promoting Ayer's Sarsaparilla as prepared by "Dr. J. C. Ayer & Co." of Lowell, Massachusetts and sold by James Mitchell, a merchant in West Eaton, New York. Sarsaparilla is a plant whose root is used is used to make flavorings and medicine. Although sarsaparilla actually may have medicinal properties, such as reducing inflammation and treating joint pain and certain skin diseases, it is not the "blood" cure-all this advertisement claims it to be. The text on back claims Ayer's Sarsaparilla treats "scrofula and all scrofulous, mercurial, and blood disorders." Other ads by Ayer's also named other ailments its sarsaparilla could supposedly treat. Ayer's Sarsaparilla was simply one of many patent medicines at the time that proliferated during the late nineteenth century. Patent medicines are products that are marketed with questionable claims about their medicinal properties. Food and drug regulation acts, beginning with the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906, put a stop to the patent medicine industry. The manufacturer of Ayer's Sarsaparilla, Dr. J. C. Ayer & Company, was founded by James Cook Ayer (1818-1878), an American businessman who specialized in making and selling patent medicines. It is thought that Ayer never became a doctor (despite the "Dr." in the company's name), but he did study medicine and apprenticed under several pharmacists. Ayer entered the patent medicine industry after buying the apothecary of one his former mentors in Lowell, MA. In 1843 or 1844, he made his first patent medicine, a cherry-flavored cough syrup called Cherry Pectoral, which was marketed as being able to cure coughs and a host of lung-related illnesses. Things took off from there and Ayer soon introduced other products in the company such as Cathartic Pills (supposedly claimed digestive ailments), Ague Cure (claimed to cure malaria), and Hair Vigor (supposedly recolors gray hair). Ayer's Sarsaparilla was introduced around 1859 and would become the company's most lucrative product. Dr. J. C. Ayer & Co. eventually became one of the most successful patent medicine companies of the time. Trade cards are antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, some trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023552

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Good. Original trade card with a beautiful color illustration on front showing a scenic California oceanfront with palm trees and cactuses. The title of the illustration is "California Palms." No date, circa 1900-1920. 6 1/2" x 9." Trade card is clean and intact overall but has a piece missing in the upper-left corner measuring about 3/4" x 3/4." Text and illustration are not affected by this chip. There is also age toning on back, a few marks on front and back, and surface tearing along the top edge of the back from where the card appears to have been adhered to something. A Good copy. Trade card promoting patent medicines, "Sarsaparilla and Iron Water" and "Orangine" tonic, as sold by Schmidt & Co. in Stockton, California. "Sarsaparilla and Iron Water" are printed on front." The latter half of the title promoting "Orangine" is stamped on the back in purple ink. Trade cards are antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023561

  • Thompson, Loyd

    Published by Haldeman-Julius Publications, Girard, Kansas, 1931

    Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
    Contact seller

    Seller Rating: 5-star rating

    Book

    US$ 5.00 Shipping

    Within U.S.A.

    Quantity: 1

    Add to Basket

    Illustrated Wrappers. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. 59-page booklet with publisher's advertising. 5 1/4" x 8 1/2". Slight water spotting and sun fading to bottom edge of front cover. Sun fading to top edge of rear cover. Contents include: The History of Syphilis; The Importance of Syphilis (Geographical Distribution. Economic Importance.); The General Course of Syphilis (Chancre. Lymphatic Glands. Skin Eruptions. etc.); Congenital Syphilis (Etiology. Syphilis in the Third Generation. etc.); Prognosis; Treatment (Mercury. Arsenic. Bismuth. Intraspinal Treatment. etc.); etc.

    Seller Inventory # 4371

  • Anonymous

    Published by Emerson Drug Co., Baltimore, Maryland, 1915

    Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
    Contact seller

    Seller Rating: 5-star rating

    Book

    US$ 5.00 Shipping

    Within U.S.A.

    Quantity: 1

    Add to Basket

    Soft cover. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Pocket book calendar (2 3/4 x 4 1/2 inch) with 1915-16 calendar, advertisement for bromo-seltzer, multiplication table, blank writing pages, and sheet-music promo list from the drug company. [16] pages; stiff paper wrapper. Very good clean specimen.

    Seller Inventory # 10372

  • US$ 5.00 Shipping

    Within U.S.A.

    Quantity: 1

    Add to Basket

    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of mermaids grooming their hair in a picturesque ocean bay, a nod to the advertised product, Ayer's Hair Vigor which claims to restore "gray hair to its natural vitality and color." No date, circa 1880s-1890s. 4 1/4" x 2 3/4." Trade card is very clean and intact except for age toning mostly limited to the back. A Very Good copy. Trade card for J. C. Ayer & Company and one of its patent medicines, Ayer's Hair Vigor. Printed text on back describes the product and its purported restorative properties for hair. James Cook Ayer (1818-1878) was a patent medicine businessman who was among the most successful in the industry. His factory was based in Lowell, Massachusetts. Patent medicines are medicinal products whose healing or curative properties are questionable at best. Historically, many were actually dangerous and contained unsafe levels of alcohol and undisclosed substances such as narcotics. The history of patent medicines in United States begins at its inception but it was not until the years leading up to the Civil War that they became popular. Despite the misleading and even dangerous nature of patent medicines, they achieved peak popularity during the latter half of the nineteenth century. Around the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Progressive movements led by journalists, watchdog groups, and legislators began to stem the tide of patent medicines. 1906 marked the passing of the first federal Food and Drug Act which required medicinal products to disclose their active ingredients, be accurately labeled, and not fall below certain purity levels set by the U.S. Pharmacopeia and National Formulary. Subsequent legislation over the years helped solidify food and drug safety measures that made it difficult for misleading and dangerous medicines to reach the general public. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023260

  • Anonymous

    Published by American Stereoscopic Views

    Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
    Contact seller

    Seller Rating: 5-star rating

    Book

    US$ 5.00 Shipping

    Within U.S.A.

    Quantity: 1

    Add to Basket

    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Fine. circa.1880. Part of the 'Boston and Vicinity' Series, Public Garden. Stereograph on pink board (3 1/2 x 7 inch) with square corners, title label pasted on the backside. Image of a woman in period dress and umbrella with her black attendant holding her bag, both looking up at the monument. The monument was created to celebrate the use of ether in operations, but no names are given as there was controversy as to who used it first so a 12 century Moorish doctor is depicted applying the ether to a sick man. Fine clean copy.

    Seller Inventory # 11805

  • None

    Published by Keystone View Company, Meadville, PA, 1900

    Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
    Contact seller

    Seller Rating: 5-star rating

    Book

    US$ 5.00 Shipping

    Within U.S.A.

    Quantity: 1

    Add to Basket

    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. # 11163. Stereography tan card (7 x 3 1/2 inch) with commentary on the back side of the card. Nice view of the remains of the temple in Athens. Clean copy with slight bump to the upper left corner.

    Seller Inventory # 9064

  • Anonymous

    Published by Keystone View Company, Meadville, PA

    Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
    Contact seller

    Seller Rating: 5-star rating

    Book

    US$ 5.00 Shipping

    Within U.S.A.

    Quantity: 1

    Add to Basket

    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Good. # 21786 (255). Stereograph on gray board (7 x 3 1/2 inch) with commentary on the backside about the hospital and the American battle with disease and the mosquito. A view of the hospital grounds and Ancon Hill behind it. Clean copy save a brown spot on the left photo (1/8 inch across).

    Seller Inventory # 9313

  • Anonymous

    Published by Miles Laboratories, Inc., Elkhart, Indiana

    Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
    Contact seller

    Seller Rating: 5-star rating

    Book

    US$ 5.00 Shipping

    Within U.S.A.

    Quantity: 1

    Add to Basket

    Soft cover. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. 32 pages; illustrations; paper wrapper (6 x 4 3/4 inch). A joke book with ads for Dr. Miles Nervine and Alka-Seltzer.

    Seller Inventory # 10267