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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Circa 1900. Scene shows planted areas amid walkways with larger plants and a statue as the focal point. Some visitors strolling on walkways. No name of publisher, studio or date.

    Seller Inventory # 3912

  • Thompson, H. C.

    Published by United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C., 1918

    Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
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    Illustrated Wrappers. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Farmers' Bulletin 934, United States Department of Agriculture. Illustrations. Contents include: Importance of the home garden, Location of the garden, Plan and arrangement of the garden, Importance of sunlight, Tools and Seeds, Preparation of the soil, Manures and fertilizers, Cultivation, Irrigation, etc.

    Seller Inventory # 3930

  • Mulford, F. L.

    Published by U. S. Department of Agriculture, (Washington, D. C.), 1922

    Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
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    Illustrated Wrappers. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. 39-page pamphlet. Illustrations. Contents include: Roses for the lawn and border; Roses for the arbor and trellis; Roses for cutting; Roses for other ornamental purposes; Soil and fertilizer; Planting; Pruning; Protection; Insect Remedies; etc.

    Seller Inventory # 4039

  • Morse, W. J.

    Published by U. S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C., 1917

    Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
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    Illustrated Wrappers. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Farmers' Bulletin 886. September, 1917. Illustrations. Contents include: The soybean as a seed crop; Time of harvesting; Methods of harvesting; Methods of curing and handling; Thrashing; Special bean harvesters; Soy-bean straw; and Storage of seed.

    Seller Inventory # 4047

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    Illustrated Wrappers. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Reprinted from Proceedings of the American Society for Horticultural Science, Vol. 38, 1940. Contents include: Varieties and Location of Plots; Method of Leaf Sampling; Tree Variability; The Effect of Crop on Leaf K; Effect of Soil Moisture on Leaf K; Effect of Potassium in the Soil on Potassium in the Leaf; etc. Includes tables showing study results.

    Seller Inventory # 4163

  • Halsted, Byron D.

    Publication Date: 1892

    Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
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    Illustrated Wrappers. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. From Botanical Gazette, Vol. XVII, pages 113-118. From the opening paragraph: "Reference is here made to the relation of the fungous parasites of wild plants, including weeds, to our crops whether of fruit, grains, or vegetables. This deleterious influence can best be brought out by taking up some of the worst fungous enemies to crops and showing the range of these parasites upon the surrounding wild plants.".

    Seller Inventory # 4272

  • Hibbard, P.L.

    Published by College of Agriculture, University of California, Berekely, California, 1917

    Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
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    Soft cover. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. College of Agriculture, Agricultural Experiment Station. Bulletin No. 288. Pages 187-192; tables; paper wrapper with title on the cover. Intro - "Study indicates that 100 to 200 pounds of potash to the acre, worth at present prices, $15.00 to $30.00, map be obtained from a heavy growth of tule, at a cost of perhaps $5.00 to $10.00 per acre.".

    Seller Inventory # 10626

  • Meier, F.C.

    Published by U.S. Dept of Agriculture, Washington, D. C., 1920

    Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
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    Soft cover. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Department Circular 90. 11 pages; illustrations; paper wrapper with title on the cover. Study of the use of Bordeaux mixture spray to control Anthracnose in the fields. Experiment lasted for four years and includes added information. Small amount of chewing to the lower right bottom.

    Seller Inventory # 10642

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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Fine. Circa 1880. View of beech trees in a park in Burnham. Photograph (6 3/4 x 4 1/4 inch) mounted on white cardstock (8 x 6 inch). Title in white at the base of the photo.

    Seller Inventory # 10126

  • Marsh, Warner Lincoln

    Published by (Warner Lincoln Marsh and Associates), (Los Angeles)

    Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
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    Illustrated Wrappers. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Circa 1920. 8-page pamphlet, 3 1/2" x 6". Illustrations. From page 3: "Modern garden design is founded upon two basic principles. The principle of Utility. The principle of Unity. Utility requires that each garden and all of its contributing parts must have a definite use and a reason for its existence. Unity demands that each garden and all of its contributing parts must exist in harmonious relationship with its surroundings". Pamphlet points out the importance of planning, design, and the economic side.

    Seller Inventory # 4266

  • Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Fine. Original black and white photo postcard. No date, circa 1925-1942. 5 1/2" x 3 1/2." Title printed at the bottom of the image. "DOPS" stamp box printed on the back was used from 1925-1942. Postcard is unused. Postcard is virtually pristine and intact except for slight corner and edge wear. A Fine copy. This postcard shows the "Sunken Garden" in Laredo, Texas. There are chairs placed on a neatly manicured lawn with surrounding trees and plants. A building is visible in the background. The location is possibly a botanical garden.

    Seller Inventory # 022620

  • Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Fine. Original black and white photo postcard. No date, circa 1924-1949. 5 1/2" x 3 1/2." Title printed at the bottom of the image. The style of "AZO" stamp box on the back was used from 1924-1949. Postcard is unused. Postcard is virtually pristine and intact except for a few light smudges on the back. A Fine copy. This postcard shows a desert landscape with different plants including the saguaro cactus.

    Seller Inventory # 022599

  • Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Fine. Original black and white photo postcard. No date, circa 1925-1942. 5 1/2" x 3 1/2." Title printed at the bottom of the image. "DOPS" stamp box printed on the back was used from 1925-1942. Postcard is unused. Postcard is virtually pristine and intact except for slight corner and edge wear. A Fine copy. This postcard shows several saguaro cactuses in a desert landscape in Arizona.

    Seller Inventory # 022602

  • Publication Date: 1914

    Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original black and white photo postcard. Postmarked April 14, 1914 at the junction of "La Junta & Albuquerque, R.P.O. [Railway Post Office]." 4 3/4" x 3 1/2." There is a green, one-cent George Washington stamp tipped in on the back. The stamp is part of a series issued from 1908-1922. Postcard is used. Postcard is very clean and intact except for slight corner wear and a small smudge on the image. A Very Good copy. This postcard shows a garden outside of a building. Mrs. Simpson in Las Vegas, Nevada is addressed from possibly her parents. They write about having fun walking in a garden and how it was a "fine day.".

    Seller Inventory # 022668

  • Published by Great Britain

    Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Fine. Original black-and-white photo postcard. No date, circa 1928-1951. 5 1/2" x 3 1/2." Title printed at the bottom of the image. "Valentine's Post Card" and "This Is a Real Photograph" printed on the back. The style of stamp box on the back with "39-1" and "Printed in Great Britain" is similar to that of a Valentine & Sons stamp box used from 1928-1951. Postcard is unused. Postcard is virtually pristine and intact except for a few light marks on the back. A Fine copy. This postcard shows Kimberley Park in Falmouth, Cornwall, England. The park first opened to the public during the nineteenth century when the Earl of Kimberley leased it to the Borough of Falmouth. Kimberley Park is still open to this day. Valentine & Sons was founded in 1825 as a lithographic company by John Valentine in Dundee, Scotland. John's son, James Valentine (1815-1879), joined as a business partner just five years later. James eventually took over the business and restructured the company in 1851. Valentine & Sons became a leading manufacturer of postcards in both Scotland and abroad when it ventured into the industry during the 1890s. After James's passing, the company was run by his two sons, William Dobson Valentine (1844-1907) and George Valentine (1852-1890). The company continued to operate until 1963 when it was sold to John Waddington, Limited. John Waddington then sold the business to Hallmark Cards in 1980. Valentine & Sons formally ceased operations in 1994 when their factory in Dundee closed.

    Seller Inventory # 022771

  • Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original black-and-white photo postcard. No date, circa 1907-1920s. 5 1/2" x 3 1/2." The style of "NOKO" stamp box on back was used from 1907 to the 1920s. Postcard is used but was never formally sent with postage. The correspondence is similar to a letter. Postcard is very clean and intact except for slight corner and edge wear, a few small wrinkles, and age toning on back. A Very Good copy. This postcard shows what appears to be a family portrait in front of a house. There is handwriting in red-brown ink that fills the entire back. The writer addresses their friend and talks about the house in the photo as well as the surrounding foliage. They write about their roses; how they have red, white, and yellow roses; and that the rose bush behind the people in the photo is as tall as the house. To the left of the group is a palm tree. The writer also mentions they have another palm tree nearby.

    Seller Inventory # 022798

  • Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original black-and-white photo postcard. No date, circa 1907-1917. 5 1/2" x 3 1/2." The style of "Velox" stamp box on back was used from 1907-1917. Postcard is unused but has handwriting in black ink on front and back. It appears to have never been formally sent with postage. Postcard is very clean and intact except for slight age toning on front and back, a small bump in the upper-left corner mostly limited to the margin, and a piece of gray paper stuck on the back. A Very Good copy. This postcard shows an expansive, tropical-looking garden with a house in the background. Inscription on front reads, "Find two little girls in picture." The postcard is addressed to Mrs. Alia Sheridan in Sumner, Illinois. "G." writes to Alia, "There are two little girls in this picture, can you find them? The fence is made of split bamboo. The house is also of bamboo with grass roof. G." "Laurina [?] Co." also written to the side on the back.

    Seller Inventory # 022844

  • Yanez, Mauricio

    Published by Mauricio Yanez, Mexico

    Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Good. Text is in Spanish. Original black-and-white photo postcard. No date, circa 1934. 5 1/2" x 3 1/2." Title and imprint of "Yanez Fot." printed at the bottom of the image. A red, 4-cent stamp with the years "1910" and "1934" and an illustration of a building is tipped in on the back. Stamp is torn in the lower-right corner. Postcard is used. Postcard is clean and intact overall but has slight age wear on the image and about six pinholes that affect the image. A Good copy. This postcard shows the Botanical Garden in Chapultepec, one of the largest city parks in the entire Western Hemisphere that resides in Mexico City. A man is shown standing next to numerous cactuses beyond which are more plants and trees. There is handwriting in English on the back in red pencil. Delaphine (?) writes to Miss Evelyn Bannister in Fargo, North Dakota, "Christmas greetings from Mexico City. It is a beautifully sunny, warm day--just like summer. And yet it is Christmas day. We are seeing beautiful scenery and interesting evidences of early Indian culture." Mauricio Yanez (1882-1939) was a Mexican photographer who was born in Yahualica, Jalisco. He built his own camera and began taking photographs early in his life. He worked with fellow photographer Ignacio Gomez Gallardo in Guadalajara and later worked with David Alberto Cossio in Monterrey to co-found the literary magazine, Azteca. Yanez began selling photographic postcards in December 1928 in which he depicted local scenes in Mexico. Yanez printed about five million photo postcards in his career.

    Seller Inventory # 022938

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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of a white rose sitting on pine bough. A bay or lake is visible in the background. Gilt decorative border around the illustration. No text on back. No date, circa 1880s-1910s. 4 3/4" x 3." Trade card is very clean and intact except for slight edge wear and some pink residual marks from perhaps another illustration. A Very Good copy. Trade card for an unknown company and product. It is likely that the "white" refers to the advertised product. Trade cards are antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, some trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023518

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of a woman wearing fine clothes as she poses by a garden with what appears to be a red book in her hands. A bucolic landscape and country home are visible in the background. An example of the New Home Sewing Machine is pictured in the lower-right corner. No date, circa 1880s-1910s. 2 3/4" x 4 1/2." Trade card is very clean and intact except for age toning and a dog-eared fold in both of the top corners. A Very Good copy. Trade card for the New Home Sewing Machine Company in Orange, Massachusetts. The history of the New Home Sewing Machine first began in1860 when William Barker and Andrew J. Clark produced the New England Single Thread and Hand Sewing Machine in Orange, MA. Barker and Clark also released the Home Shuttle sewing machine. In 1882, the names of these two highly successful products were combined into the New Home Sewing Machine. The company also changed its name to match its new central product. The New Home Sewing Machine Company enjoyed many decades of success until1960 when the company and the "New Home" brand name were purchased by the Janome Sewing Machine Company of Tokyo, Japan. Trade cards are antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, some trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023523

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of a woman wearing fine clothes as she poses by a garden holding a basket of flowers and a parasol. A bucolic landscape and country home are visible in the background. An example of the New Home Sewing Machine is pictured in the lower-right corner. No date, circa 1880s-1910s. 2 1/2" x 4 1/2." Trade card is very clean and intact except for age toning. A Very Good copy. Trade card for the New Home Sewing Machine Company in Orange, Massachusetts and dealer Gaul & Wilber in Morrisville, New York. The history of the New Home Sewing Machine first began in1860 when William Barker and Andrew J. Clark produced the New England Single Thread and Hand Sewing Machine in Orange, MA. Barker and Clark also released the Home Shuttle sewing machine. In 1882, the names of these two highly successful products were combined into the New Home Sewing Machine. The company also changed its name to match its new central product. The New Home Sewing Machine Company enjoyed many decades of success until1960 when the company and the "New Home" brand name were purchased by the Janome Sewing Machine Company of Tokyo, Japan. Trade cards are antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, some trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023524

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of a woman wearing fine clothes as she poses by a garden with what appears to be a red book in her hands. A bucolic landscape and country home are visible in the background. An example of the New Home Sewing Machine is pictured in the lower-right corner. No date, circa 1880s-1910s. 2 3/4" x 4 1/2." Trade card is very clean and intact except for age toning. A Very Good copy. Trade card for the New Home Sewing Machine Company in Orange, Massachusetts and dealer Gaul & Wilber in Morrisville, New York. The history of the New Home Sewing Machine first began in1860 when William Barker and Andrew J. Clark produced the New England Single Thread and Hand Sewing Machine in Orange, MA. Barker and Clark also released the Home Shuttle sewing machine. In 1882, the names of these two highly successful products were combined into the New Home Sewing Machine. The company also changed its name to match its new central product. The New Home Sewing Machine Company enjoyed many decades of success until1960 when the company and the "New Home" brand name were purchased by the Janome Sewing Machine Company of Tokyo, Japan. Trade cards are antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, some trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023529

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of a woman wearing fine clothes as she poses by a garden holding a basket of flowers and a parasol. A bucolic landscape and country home are visible in the background. An example of the New Home Sewing Machine is pictured in the lower-right corner. No date, circa 1880s-1910s. 2 1/2" x 4 1/2." Trade card is very clean and intact except for age toning and a small mark at bottom on front. A Very Good copy. Trade card for the New Home Sewing Machine Company in Orange, Massachusetts. The history of the New Home Sewing Machine first began in1860 when William Barker and Andrew J. Clark produced the New England Single Thread and Hand Sewing Machine in Orange, MA. Barker and Clark also released the Home Shuttle sewing machine. In 1882, the names of these two highly successful products were combined into the New Home Sewing Machine. The company also changed its name to match its new central product. The New Home Sewing Machine Company enjoyed many decades of success until1960 when the company and the "New Home" brand name were purchased by the Janome Sewing Machine Company of Tokyo, Japan. Trade cards are antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, some trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023525

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of a woman wearing fine clothes as she appears to study a plant, notepad and some type of instrument in-hand. A bucolic landscape and country home are visible in the background. An example of the New Home Sewing Machine is pictured in the lower-right corner. No date, circa 1880s-1910s. 2 3/4" x 4 1/2." Trade card is very clean and intact except for age toning. A Very Good copy. Trade card for the New Home Sewing Machine Company in Orange, Massachusetts. The history of the New Home Sewing Machine first began in1860 when William Barker and Andrew J. Clark produced the New England Single Thread and Hand Sewing Machine in Orange, MA. Barker and Clark also released the Home Shuttle sewing machine. In 1882, the names of these two highly successful products were combined into the New Home Sewing Machine. The company also changed its name to match its new central product. The New Home Sewing Machine Company enjoyed many decades of success until1960 when the company and the "New Home" brand name were purchased by the Janome Sewing Machine Company of Tokyo, Japan. Trade cards are antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, some trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023526

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of a floral bouquet, rose in center, with the following promotional text: "The Light Running New Home. Sewing Machine. Simplest & Best." No date, circa 1880s-1910s. 2 3/4" x 4." Trade card is very clean and intact except for age toning and a few marks on front and back. A Very Good copy. Trade card for dealer E. J. Preston in Oneida, New York. Preston sells pianos, organs, and the Light Running New Home Sewing Machine. The history of the New Home Sewing Machine first began in1860 when William Barker and Andrew J. Clark produced the New England Single Thread and Hand Sewing Machine in Orange, Massachusetts. Barker and Clark also released the Home Shuttle sewing machine. In 1882, the names of these two highly successful products were combined into the New Home Sewing Machine. The company also changed its name to match its new central product. The New Home Sewing Machine Company enjoyed many decades of success until1960 when the company and the "New Home" brand name were purchased by the Janome Sewing Machine Company of Tokyo, Japan. Trade cards are antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, some trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023522

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of a woman tending to a rose bush. A bucolic landscape and country home are visible in the background. An example of the New Home Sewing Machine is pictured in the lower-right corner. No date, circa 1880s-1910s. 2 1/2" x 4 1/2." Trade card is very clean and intact except for age toning and a small mark at bottom on front. A Very Good copy. Trade card for the New Home Sewing Machine Company in Orange, Massachusetts. The history of the New Home Sewing Machine first began in1860 when William Barker and Andrew J. Clark produced the New England Single Thread and Hand Sewing Machine in Orange, MA. Barker and Clark also released the Home Shuttle sewing machine. In 1882, the names of these two highly successful products were combined into the New Home Sewing Machine. The company also changed its name to match its new central product. The New Home Sewing Machine Company enjoyed many decades of success until1960 when the company and the "New Home" brand name were purchased by the Janome Sewing Machine Company of Tokyo, Japan. Trade cards are antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, some trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023531

  • Glen Brothers, Glenwood Nurseries

    Published by Vredenburg & Co., Rochester, NY, 1902

    Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of three roses, with each representing the three advertised varieties at top, "Jubilee," "Clio," and "Margaret Dickson." 5 1/2" x 3." Printed by Vredenburg & Company of Rochester, New York. Trade card is very clean and intact except for age toning on back and light smudges on front. A Very Good copy. Trade card for Glen Brothers, Glen Nurseries in Rochester, New York. The front promotes the following in bold lettering: "Our Gold Medal Collection of Roses, $2.00! Superbly Beautiful, Delightfully Fragrant." The text on back goes into further detail and says each of the three advertised rose varieties is $1.00 and $2.00 for all three. Brief descriptions of the three roses' appearances and other traits are also included on back. Trade cards are antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, some trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023540

  • Anonymous

    Published by Underwood & Underwood, New York, 1903

    Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Scene shows an embankment with a stairway of flowers forming designs and an entryway of flowers at the top of the stairs. A little girl is sitting on the embankment. Title is "The way to Fairyland, up stairway of flowers and through living Gates".

    Seller Inventory # 4013

  • Oliver, George W.

    Published by U. S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, 1911

    Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
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    Seller Rating: 5-star rating

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    Illustrated Wrappers. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Bureau of Plant Industry -- Bulletin No. 202. Illustrations. U.S. Department of Agriculture notice of mailing and University of California publications list laid in. The "seedling-inarch method of propagation", worked out by Mr. Oliver, is of great importance in a wide range of plant industries where early fruiting is very desirable. This method could shorten the time required for fruiting by a year or more. "The discussion embodied in this bulletin, while it indicates the present stage of our studies of certain tropical-fruit industries, must be considered as having a much more general application than to these few new-fruit possibilities which are as yet little known to the American public".

    Seller Inventory # 4042

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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Fine. circa.1890. Unmounted photograph (6 x 4 3/8 inch) b/w with title printed across the bottom. No Photographer's name given. Image of the East Terrace looking toward the castle with statues in the foreground. Fine clean copy.

    Seller Inventory # 11362