196 results

Product Type

Condition

Binding

Collectible Attributes

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  • Miller, Edna

    Published by Utah State Agricultural College Extension Service, Logan, Utah, 1932

    Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. 8 page brochure with black and white cover illustration, notes on vitamin content, recipes for tomato cocktail, omelet, sauce, soup, scalloped egg plant with tomatoes, jelly, aspic salad, rarebit, Spanish rice, etc., 9x6". (College series no. 344). Light stain in lower corner, else very good, owner name on cover.

    Seller Inventory # 5999

  • Seller image for Original Trade Card - "Arbuckle Bros. Coffee Company, New York" for sale by Barry Cassidy Rare Books

    Arbuckle Bros. Coffee Company

    Published by Knapp & Co., New York, 1889

    Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of a young girl feeding and petting a calf. Copyright information printed below the illustration. 5" x 3." Trade card is very clean and intact. Slightly bumped corners and age toning on back. A Very Good copy. Trade card for the Arbuckle Brothers Coffee Company in New York. The back had the number ?"18" at the bottom and reads, "This is one of a Series of 50 different Subjects on Cooking." The right half on back includes four recipes for preparing veal. The left half of the back promotes the Arbackle Bros.' Ariosa coffee. Printer's information: "Knapp & Co. Lith. N.Y." Arbuckle Bros. was a coffee company founded by brothers John Arbuckle (1839-1912) and Charles Arbuckle in the 1860s. Sadly, Charles passed away at an early age. John continued to build the business and the Brooklyn factory opened in 1871. Arbuckle Bros. was once the largest coffee company in the United States. Their most famous coffee blend was Ariosa, which was the first national brand of coffee. Following the passing of John in 1912, Arbuckle family members continued to operate the business. Arbuckle Bros. stayed in the Arbuckle family until the 1930s when the company was acquired by General Foods. A separate coffee company in Arizona called Arbuckles' revived the Arbuckle name and still operates to this day. Notably, Arbuckles' still sells the Arbuckle Brothers' signature brand, Ariosa. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023171

  • Seller image for Original Trade Card - "Arbuckle Bros." for sale by Barry Cassidy Rare Books

    Arbuckle Bros.

    Publication Date: 1883

    Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a color illustration on front, titled, "Australia." The illustration shows two composite scenes. One scene depicts an Indigenous man in Australia aiming to strike a fleeing rabbit with a boomerang with four boys enjoying a local pastime of swinging from tree in a circle. The other scene is contained within a frame on which a cockatoo is perched and shows two Indigenous men on horseback with kangaroos in the foreground. Illustration is copyrighted 1883. 5" x 3." Trade card is very clean and intact on front. Back also intact but stained. A Very Good copy. Trade card for the Arbuckle Brothers Coffee Company in New York City. The back reads, "No. 32" (this card could be part of a collectable series), and includes promotional information about the Arbuckle Bros. as well as Australia. The text references how the Indigenous people of Australia were driven inland and how Australia was colonized by England. Most of the text is about the boomerang, Australian animals, and the potential for successful sports hunting in Australia. Arbuckle Bros. was a coffee company founded by brothers John Arbuckle (1839-1912) and Charles Arbuckle in the 1860s. Sadly, Charles passed away at an early age. John continued to build the business and the Brooklyn factory opened in 1871. Arbuckle Bros. was once the largest coffee company in the United States. Their most famous coffee blend was Ariosa, which was the first national brand of coffee. Following the passing of John in 1912, Arbuckle family members continued to operate the business. Arbuckle Bros. stayed in the Arbuckle family until the 1930s when the company was acquired by General Foods. A separate coffee company in Arizona called Arbuckles' revived the Arbuckle name and still operates to this day. Notably, Arbuckles' still sells the Arbuckle Brothers' signature brand, Ariosa. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023170

  • Seller image for Original Trade Card - "Lion Coffee . Manufactured by Woolson Spice Co, Toledo, Ohio" for sale by Barry Cassidy Rare Books
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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of an open box with flowers loosely propped against it. A picture of a landscape is shown on the underside of the lid. Gilt border on front. No date, circa 1890s-1910s. 4 1/2" x 3." Trade card is very clean and intact. One wrinkle at the bottom. Slight edge wear and a few small surface chips on the gilt border. A Very Good copy. Trade card for the Woolson Spice Company in Toledo, Ohio that promotes its Lion Coffee brand. Text on back: "If you want a picture card like this buy a package of Lion Coffee. It is composed of a successful combination of Mocha, Java and Rio, And is roasted with the greatest care, but is not ground. Is never sold in bulk. Beautiful picture in every package; Lion Is The King of Coffees; Manufactured by Woolson Spice Co, Toledo, Ohio." Woolson Spice Co. was founded by Alvin and William Woolson in 1882. Lion Coffee actually originated in 1864 with a separate Toledo company, C. C. Warren & Company. In 1882, Woolson Spice Co. acquired the Lion Coffee brand. The company remained in business until 1920. However, the story of Woolson Spice Co. continued when Delano West Ltd. of Hawai'i acquired the company's assets, including the Lion Coffee brand, in 1979. Lion Coffee is still sold to this day. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023173

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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of flowers growing on a wall. No date, circa 1890s-1910s. 4 1/2" x 3." Trade card is very clean and intact except for slightly bumped corners, slight edge wear, and age toning. A Very Good copy. Trade card for the Woolson Spice Company in Toledo, Ohio that promotes its Lion Coffee brand. Text on back: "If you want a picture card like this buy a package of Lion Coffee. It is composed of a successful combination of Mocha, Java and Rio, And is roasted with the greatest care, but is not ground. Is never sold in bulk. Beautiful picture in every package. Lion Is The King of Coffees. Manufactured by Woolson Spice Co., - - Toledo, Ohio." Woolson Spice Co. was founded by Alvin and William Woolson in 1882. Lion Coffee actually originated in 1864 with a separate Toledo company, C. C. Warren & Company. In 1882, Woolson Spice Co. acquired the Lion Coffee brand. The company remained in business until 1920. However, the story of Woolson Spice Co. continued when Delano West Ltd. of Hawai'i acquired the company's assets, including the Lion Coffee brand, in 1979. Lion Coffee is still sold to this day. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023175

  • Merten Moffitt & Co.

    Published by Schmidt Label & Lith. Co., San Francisco, CA

    Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of a girl holding a parasol surrounded by different fruits on the right and flowers on the left. No date, circa 1890s. 4 1/2" x 3 1/4." Printer's information in bottom margin on front: "Schmidt Label & Lith. Co. S.F." Trade card is very clean and intact overall. Age toning to front and back. Bumped corners. A few small surface tears on back not affecting the front. A Very Good copy. Trade card for Merten Moffit & Company in San Francisco, California. The company's speciality is printed on the girl's parasol, "Flavoring Extracts." Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated businesses. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023174

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Fine. Text is in German. Original trade card with a color illustration a scene from Homer's Odyssey. Odysseus is shown tied to the mast of his ship to protect himself as it rides past the rocks inhabited by sirens, who are depicted in the foreground seeking to bring the crew to their watery graves. An explanation of the myth is on the back. No date, circa 1910s-1930s. 2 3/4" x 4 1/2." Trade card is virtually pristine and intact. A Fine copy. Trade card for Liebig's Extract of Meat Company that promotes its meat (beef) extract. The number "3" of this card suggests it may be part of a collectable series. The story of Liebig's began when German chemist Justus von Liebig (1803-1873) made a concentrated beef extract in 1847. Liebig promoted the extract as an economical way to consume beef. In 1865, Liebig's Extract of Meat Company was officially established in London. The beef extract became the company's signature product and achieved much popularity in middle-class European households by the 1860s. However, the extract's selling point as a beef substitute shifted to a flavoring ingredient when scientists proved the extract had little to no nutritive value. The company released more products over the years including the OXO brand bouillon cube in 1911. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023192

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Fine. Text is in Dutch. Original trade card with a color illustration of an Indigenous woman in Papua New Guinea holding her child on her back. Homes in the background. No date, circa 1910s-1930s. 2 3/4" x 4 1/2." Trade card is virtually pristine and intact. A Fine copy. Trade card for Liebig's Extract of Meat Company that promotes its bouillon cubes. This card also describes the people and country of Papua New Guinea from a Western perspective. The number "5" of this card suggests it may be part of a collectable series. The story of Liebig's began when German chemist Justus von Liebig (1803-1873) made a concentrated beef extract in 1847. Liebig promoted the extract as an economical way to consume beef. In 1865, Liebig's Extract of Meat Company was officially established in London. The beef extract became the company's signature product and achieved much popularity in middle-class European households by the 1860s. However, the extract's selling point as a beef substitute shifted to a flavoring ingredient when scientists proved the extract had little to no nutritive value. The company released more products over the years including the OXO brand bouillon cube in 1911. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023191

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Fine. Text is in German. Original trade card with a color illustration of a scene from Homer's Odyssey. Odysseus is shown chopping at a tree with an axe so he can build a raft and leave the island of Ogygia and return home. An explanation of the myth is on the back. No date, circa 1910s-1930s. 2 3/4" x 4 1/2." Trade card is virtually pristine and intact. A Fine copy. Trade card for Liebig's Extract of Meat Company that promotes its meat (beef) extract. The number "4" of this card suggests it may be part of a collectable series. The story of Liebig's began when German chemist Justus von Liebig (1803-1873) made a concentrated beef extract in 1847. Liebig promoted the extract as an economical way to consume beef. In 1865, Liebig's Extract of Meat Company was officially established in London. The beef extract became the company's signature product and achieved much popularity in middle-class European households by the 1860s. However, the extract's selling point as a beef substitute shifted to a flavoring ingredient when scientists proved the extract had little to no nutritive value. The company released more products over the years including the OXO brand bouillon cube in 1911. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, some trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023193

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Fine. Text is in German. Original trade card with a color illustration of a scene from Homer's Odyssey. Odysseus is shown clinging to a part of his shipwreck while Leukothea comes to his rescue. She gives him an enchanted veil that allows him to reach the shore so he can continue on his journey home to the island of Ithaca. An explanation of the myth is on the back. No date, circa 1910s-1930s. 4 1/2" x 2 3/4." Trade card is virtually pristine and intact. A Fine copy. Trade card for Liebig's Extract of Meat Company that promotes its meat (beef) extract. The number "5" of this card suggests it may be part of a collectable series. The story of Liebig's began when German chemist Justus von Liebig (1803-1873) made a concentrated beef extract in 1847. Liebig promoted the extract as an economical way to consume beef. In 1865, Liebig's Extract of Meat Company was officially established in London. The beef extract became the company's signature product and achieved much popularity in middle-class European households by the 1860s. However, the extract's selling point as a beef substitute shifted to a flavoring ingredient when scientists proved the extract had little to no nutritive value. The company released more products over the years including the OXO brand bouillon cube in 1911. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, some trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023204

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Fine. Text is in German. Original trade card with a color illustration of a scene from Homer's Odyssey. Polyphemus is shown about to throw a boulder at Odysseus's ship after Odysseus gouged his eye and flees the island. An explanation of the myth is on the back. No date, circa 1910s-1930s. 4 1/2" x 2 3/4." Trade card is virtually pristine and intact. A Fine copy. Trade card for Liebig's Extract of Meat Company that promotes its meat (beef) extract. The number "1" of this card suggests it may be part of a collectable series. The story of Liebig's began when German chemist Justus von Liebig (1803-1873) made a concentrated beef extract in 1847. Liebig promoted the extract as an economical way to consume beef. In 1865, Liebig's Extract of Meat Company was officially established in London. The beef extract became the company's signature product and achieved much popularity in middle-class European households by the 1860s. However, the extract's selling point as a beef substitute shifted to a flavoring ingredient when scientists proved the extract had little to no nutritive value. The company released more products over the years including the OXO brand bouillon cube in 1911. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, some trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023206

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Fine. Text is in German. Original trade card with a color illustration of a scene from Homer's Odyssey. Hermes is shown giving Odysseus a magic herb that will cure his men of a spell that has turned them into pigs. An explanation of the myth is on the back. No date, circa 1910s-1930s. 4 1/2" x 2 3/4." Trade card is virtually pristine and intact. A Fine copy. Trade card for Liebig's Extract of Meat Company that promotes its meat (beef) extract. The number "2" of this card suggests it may be part of a collectable series. The story of Liebig's began when German chemist Justus von Liebig (1803-1873) made a concentrated beef extract in 1847. Liebig promoted the extract as an economical way to consume beef. In 1865, Liebig's Extract of Meat Company was officially established in London. The beef extract became the company's signature product and achieved much popularity in middle-class European households by the 1860s. However, the extract's selling point as a beef substitute shifted to a flavoring ingredient when scientists proved the extract had little to no nutritive value. The company released more products over the years including the OXO brand bouillon cube in 1911. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, some trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023205

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Fine. Text is in German. Original trade card with a color illustration of a scene from Homer's Odyssey. Odysseus is shown in his disguise as a beggar with a drawn bow, about to successfully shoot an arrow through the holes of twelve upturned axes to prove to his wife Penelope that it is indeed he who has returned. An explanation of the myth is on the back. No date, circa 1910s-1930s. 4 1/2" x 2 3/4." Purple "96" stamp to the side on back. Trade card is virtually pristine and intact. A Fine copy. Trade card for Liebig's Extract of Meat Company that promotes its meat (beef) extract. The number "6" of this card suggests it may be part of a collectable series. The story of Liebig's began when German chemist Justus von Liebig (1803-1873) made a concentrated beef extract in 1847. Liebig promoted the extract as an economical way to consume beef. In 1865, Liebig's Extract of Meat Company was officially established in London. The beef extract became the company's signature product and achieved much popularity in middle-class European households by the 1860s. However, the extract's selling point as a beef substitute shifted to a flavoring ingredient when scientists proved the extract had little to no nutritive value. The company released more products over the years including the OXO brand bouillon cube in 1911. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, some trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023203

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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Fine. Text is in Italian. Original trade card with a color illustration of a Boer farm in Transvaal, South Africa. Promotional text for Liebig's Peptone of Beef on back. No date, circa 1885-1910s. 4 1/2" x 2 3/4." Trade card is virtually pristine and intact. A Fine copy. Trade card for Liebig's Extract of Meat Company that promotes its meat (beef) extract. The story of Liebig's began when German chemist Justus von Liebig (1803-1873) made a concentrated beef extract in 1847. Liebig promoted the extract as an economical way to consume beef. In 1865, Liebig's Extract of Meat Company was officially established in London. The beef extract became the company's signature product and achieved much popularity in middle-class European households by the 1860s. However, the extract's selling point as a beef substitute shifted to a flavoring ingredient when scientists proved the extract had little to no nutritive value. The company released more products over the years including the OXO brand bouillon cube in 1911. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, some trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023207

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Fine. Text is in French. Original trade card with a composite color illustration depicting examples of the Gothic style including the fountain, Schoner Brunnen, and cathedral, Eglise Notre-Dame, in Nuremberg, Germany. Promotional text for Liebig's Meat Extract and a summary of the Gothic style on back. No date, circa 1885-1910s. 2 3/4" x 4 1/2." Trade card is virtually pristine and intact. A Fine copy. Trade card for Liebig's Extract of Meat Company that promotes its meat (beef) extract. The story of Liebig's began when German chemist Justus von Liebig (1803-1873) made a concentrated beef extract in 1847. Liebig promoted the extract as an economical way to consume beef. In 1865, Liebig's Extract of Meat Company was officially established in London. The beef extract became the company's signature product and achieved much popularity in middle-class European households by the 1860s. However, the extract's selling point as a beef substitute shifted to a flavoring ingredient when scientists proved the extract had little to no nutritive value. The company released more products over the years including the OXO brand bouillon cube in 1911. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, some trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023210

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Fine. Text is in French. Original trade card with a composite color illustration depicting examples of the Renaissance style including Hotel Peller (now known as Pellerhaus), a residence commissioned by Martin Peller in Nuremberg, Germany. Promotional text for Liebig's Meat Extract and a summary of the Renaissance style on back. No date, circa 1885-1910s. 2 3/4" x 4 1/2." Trade card is virtually pristine and intact. A Fine copy. Trade card for Liebig's Extract of Meat Company that promotes its meat (beef) extract. The story of Liebig's began when German chemist Justus von Liebig (1803-1873) made a concentrated beef extract in 1847. Liebig promoted the extract as an economical way to consume beef. In 1865, Liebig's Extract of Meat Company was officially established in London. The beef extract became the company's signature product and achieved much popularity in middle-class European households by the 1860s. However, the extract's selling point as a beef substitute shifted to a flavoring ingredient when scientists proved the extract had little to no nutritive value. The company released more products over the years including the OXO brand bouillon cube in 1911. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, some trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023209

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Fine. Text is in French. Original trade card with a composite color illustration depicting examples of the Roman style including the Worms Cathedral in Worms, Germany. Promotional text for Liebig's Meat Extract and a summary of the Roman style on back. No date, circa 1885-1910s. 2 3/4" x 4 1/2." Trade card is virtually pristine and intact. A Fine copy. Trade card for Liebig's Extract of Meat Company that promotes its meat (beef) extract. The story of Liebig's began when German chemist Justus von Liebig (1803-1873) made a concentrated beef extract in 1847. Liebig promoted the extract as an economical way to consume beef. In 1865, Liebig's Extract of Meat Company was officially established in London. The beef extract became the company's signature product and achieved much popularity in middle-class European households by the 1860s. However, the extract's selling point as a beef substitute shifted to a flavoring ingredient when scientists proved the extract had little to no nutritive value. The company released more products over the years including the OXO brand bouillon cube in 1911. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, some trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023211

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Fine. Text is in French. Original trade card with a composite color illustration depicting examples of the Rococo art movement including Zwinger Palace in Dresden, Germany. Promotional text for Liebig's Meat Extract and a summary of the Rococo style on back. No date, circa 1885-1910s. 2 3/4" x 4 1/2." Trade card is virtually pristine and intact. A Fine copy. Trade card for Liebig's Extract of Meat Company that promotes its meat (beef) extract. The story of Liebig's began when German chemist Justus von Liebig (1803-1873) made a concentrated beef extract in 1847. Liebig promoted the extract as an economical way to consume beef. In 1865, Liebig's Extract of Meat Company was officially established in London. The beef extract became the company's signature product and achieved much popularity in middle-class European households by the 1860s. However, the extract's selling point as a beef substitute shifted to a flavoring ingredient when scientists proved the extract had little to no nutritive value. The company released more products over the years including the OXO brand bouillon cube in 1911. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, some trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023208

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Text is in German. Original trade card with a color illustration of the Battle of Hagelberg on August 27, 1813. No. II of Group 532 of "Stollwerck-Album," No. 14. No date, circa 1890s-1910s. 3 3/4" x 2." Trade card is very clean and intact except for slight corner and edge wear and age toning to front and back. A Very Good copy. Trade card for the Stollwerck, a chocolate company. The back advertises on of the company's products, "Stollwerck Gold-Bitter Schokolade." Also on back is informational text about the Battle of Hagelberg, one of the battles fought during the Napoleonic Wars in Prussia. Stollwerck was founded in 1839 by Franz Stollwerck in Cologne, Germany. Franz actually started the company by selling medicinal cough drops and later expanded his product line to include chocolate and other candies after the success of the cough drops. Stollwerck is still in business to this day and has been owned by the Baronie Group of Veurne, Belgium since 2011.

    Seller Inventory # 023215

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Text is in German. Original trade card with a color illustration showing the captured Austrian General Maximilian standing in front of Napoleon amid the smoldering aftermath of a battle at night. No. III of Group 534 of "Stollwerck-Album," No. 14. No date, circa 1890s-1910s. 2" x 3 3/4." Trade card is very clean and intact except for slight corner and edge wear and age toning to front and back. A Very Good copy. Trade card for the Stollwerck, a chocolate company. The back advertises on of the company's products, "Marke Gold Marke Stollwerck Ess-Schokolade." Also on back is informational text about the Battle of Leipzig during the Napoleonic Wars and the capture of General Merveldt (Maximilian, Count of Merveldt) of the Austrian II Corps. General Merveldt was captured on October 16, 1813. Stollwerck was founded in 1839 by Franz Stollwerck in Cologne, Germany. Franz actually started the company by selling medicinal cough drops and later expanded his product line to include chocolate and other candies after the success of the cough drops. Stollwerck is still in business to this day and has been owned by the Baronie Group of Veurne, Belgium since 2011.

    Seller Inventory # 023216

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Text is in German. Original trade card with a color illustration of a lady and gentleman in a park, each with their own pet dog. No. V of Group 453 of Stollwerck's "Animal Collector's Album," No. 11. No date, circa 1890s-1910s. 3 3/4" x 2." Trade card is very clean and intact except for slight corner and edge wear and age toning to front and back. A Very Good copy. Trade card for the Stollwerck, a chocolate company. The back advertises on of the company's products, "Stollwerck's Adler-Kakao." Also on back is informational text about pet owners and their dogs in urban areas. Stollwerck was founded in 1839 by Franz Stollwerck in Cologne, Germany. Franz actually started the company by selling medicinal cough drops and later expanded his product line to include chocolate and other candies after the success of the cough drops. Stollwerck is still in business to this day and has been owned by the Baronie Group of Veurne, Belgium since 2011.

    Seller Inventory # 023213

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Text is in German. Original trade card with a color illustration of Alexander I of Russia. No. I of Group 529 of "Stollwerck-Album," No. 11. No date, circa 1890s-1910s. 3 3/4" x 2." Trade card is very clean and intact except for slight corner and edge wear and age toning to front and back. A Very Good copy. Trade card for the Stollwerck, a chocolate company. The back advertises on of the company's products, "Stollwerck Gold" Also on back is informational text about Alexander I of Russia. Stollwerck was founded in 1839 by Franz Stollwerck in Cologne, Germany. Franz actually started the company by selling medicinal cough drops and later expanded his product line to include chocolate and other candies after the success of the cough drops. Stollwerck is still in business to this day and has been owned by the Baronie Group of Veurne, Belgium since 2011.

    Seller Inventory # 023214

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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Near Fine (Near Fi. Original trade card with a color illustration of a young girl enjoying a piece of candy while carrying an armful of other candies. More candy is visible at her feet. No date, circa 1880s-1910s. 3" x 4 1/4." Trade card is virtually pristine and intact except for age toning on back. A Near Fine copy. Trade card for L. T. Yoder, a confectioner in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023232

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Text is in German. Original trade card with a color illustration of Karl Friedrich von dem Knesebeck. No. II of Group 536 of "Stollwerck-Album," No. 14. No date, circa 1890s-1910s. 2" x 3 3/4." Trade card is very clean and intact except for slight corner and edge wear and age toning to front and back. A Very Good copy. Trade card for the Stollwerck, a chocolate company. The back advertises on of the company's products, "Stollwerck 'Gold.'" Also on back is informational text about the Prussian military officer Karl Friedrich von dem Knesebeck and his roles during the Napoleonic Wars as a field marshal and military advisor. Knesebeck became well-known for successful military strategies and later became a diplomat after these wars. Stollwerck was founded in 1839 by Franz Stollwerck in Cologne, Germany. Franz actually started the company by selling medicinal cough drops and later expanded his product line to include chocolate and other candies after the success of the cough drops. Stollwerck is still in business to this day and has been owned by the Baronie Group of Veurne, Belgium since 2011.

    Seller Inventory # 023217

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Text is in German. Original trade card with a color illustration of a Chinese man with a queue or braid commonly worn during the Qing Dynasty. He is riding a water buffalo near a city gate. No. VI of Group 463 of Stollwerck's Collector's Album, No. 11. No date, circa 1890s-1910s. 3 3/4" x 2." Trade card is very clean and intact except for slight corner wear and edge wear and age toning to front and back. A Very Good copy. Trade card for the Stollwerck, a chocolate company. The back advertises one of the company's products, "Dr. Michaelis Eichel-Kakao." Also on back is informational text about one of the depicted subjects on front, the water buffalo. The text focuses on the traits of water buffalo and their use as farm animals in Asia. Stollwerck was founded in 1839 by Franz Stollwerck in Cologne, Germany. Franz actually started the company by selling medicinal cough drops and later expanded his product line to include chocolate and other candies after the success of the cough drops. Stollwerck is still in business to this day and has been owned by the Baronie Group of Veurne, Belgium since 2011.

    Seller Inventory # 023212

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Text is in German. Original trade card with a color illustration of a man, who represents a chess piece, the pawn, which is shown next to him in the background. No. VI of Group 521 of "Stollwerck-Album," No. 13. No date, circa 1890s-1910s. 2" x 3 3/4." Trade card is very clean and intact except for slight corner and edge wear and age toning to front and back. A Very Good copy. Trade card for the Stollwerck, a chocolate company. The back advertises on of the company's products, "Marke Gold Marke Stollwerck Milch-Schokolade." Also on back is a short diddy about the importance of the overlooked pawn and informational text about the importance of the pawn during a game of chess. Stollwerck was founded in 1839 by Franz Stollwerck in Cologne, Germany. Franz actually started the company by selling medicinal cough drops and later expanded his product line to include chocolate and other candies after the success of the cough drops. Stollwerck is still in business to this day and has been owned by the Baronie Group of Veurne, Belgium since 2011.

    Seller Inventory # 023218

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a half-tone sepia illustration of a smiling baby wearing a bonnet amid floral decorations. No date, circa 1880s-1910s. 2 3/4" x 4 1/2." Trade card is clean and intact overall except for age toning and some surface tears limited to the back and bits of paper stuck on the back (may have been glued previously). A Very Good copy. Trade card for William Haslage & Son, grocers based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023241

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Fine. Original trade card with a color illustration of different fish species shown underwater, namely, the grey gurnard, turbot, and flounder. The illustration is accompanied with a caption of their names and scientific names. No date, circa 1880s-1910s. 5 1/2" x 4." Trade card is very clean and intact except for age toning, slight corner and edge wear, and a few faint marks. A Fine copy. Trade card for both Van Houten's Cocoa and the Coraopolis Pharmacy owned by Messrs. Oellig & Lecrone. Informational text on back is titled, "Flat-fishes and Grey Gurnard," and includes brief descriptions of the fish. Also on back is promotional text for Van Houten's Cocoa and a blue stamp of Coraopolis Pharmacy in Coraopolis, Pennsylvania. Coenraad Johannes van Houten (1801-1887) was a Dutch chemist and chocolatier who founded Van Houten Chocolates and invented "Dutch press chocolate," which utilizes an alkalizing agent to reduce the natural acidity of cocoa. Dutch press chocolate helped shape the way modern chocolates are made today, Although the actual Van Houten company was sold in 1962, the Van Houten brand name is still used to this day. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023258

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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of chicks and colorful Easter eggs on the grass. No date, circa 1900s-1910s. 1 1/2" x 2 3/4." Trade card is very clean and intact except for age toning and minuscule smudges on front. A Very Good copy. Trade card for the American Caramel Company. Printed text on back: "This card is one of a set of twenty beautifully colored Easter subjects, one of which is wrapped in every Easter Caramel." The history of the American Caramel Company begins in the latter half of the nineteenth century. Peter C. Weist was a candy maker who started his business by making caramels. His caramels were a success and Weist co-founded the candy company, P. C. Weist & Company, with Daniel Lafean in 1878. The American Caramel Company was then established in 1898 when P. C. Weist & Company merged with the Breisch-Hine Company. Beginning in the early twentieth century, the company became well-known for including collectable trade cards in its candy products. The American Caramel Company also acquired the Lancaster Caramel Company in 1900, after which the former produced about 90%-95% of the caramels sold in the United States according to contemporary newspaper accounts. However, business began to decline and the American Caramel Company closed its main plant in York, Pennsylvania in 1928. It is said that the company filed for bankruptcy and officially closed its doors soon after the plant's closure. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023259

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of a wintry scene in which two mischievous-looking boys prepare to throw snowballs at a girl holding a parasol. No date, circa 1880s-1910s. 3" x 5." Trade card is very clean and intact except for some small smudges on front and back and age toning. A Very Good copy. Trade card for Taylor & Dean, a subsidiary of Pittsburgh Iron and Wire Works. The following are just some of their products listed on back: "Fencing, Cresting, Iron Stairs; Iron Beds, Stable Fittings; Iron Shutters, Cellar Doors; Elevator Enclosures, Nursery Fenders; Automatic Elevator Gates." Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023267