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  • Publication Date: 1867

    Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Dimensions 9 1/2 x 4 1/2 inches. Black ink, decoration on left side. Not issued, no stamps or signatures. The Gold Valley Main Tunnel and Mining Company was incorporated in 1867 to perform hydraulic mining in the Poverty Hill Mining District, California. Poverty Hill is in Sierra County, though the certificate says Plumas County.

    Seller Inventory # 016020

  • Published by A. Carlisle & Co., San Francisco, 1925

    Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Dimensions 9 3/4 x 5 3/4 inches. Black ink, vignette of eagle with wings spread upper left, decorative border. Fold lines, embossed stamp. No. 50, this certificate was originally issued to the Mrs. L. Hindringer on May 18, 1925. Signed by secretary Russell Fotara (?) and president C. W. Greene. No signs of transfer or cancellation. According to the certificate, the Golden West Lumber Company was incorporated in California on April 12, 1924.

    Seller Inventory # 016027

  • Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
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    Manuscript / Paper Collectible

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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Fine. Original black and white photo postcard. No date, circa 1920s-1930s. 3 1/2" x 5 1/2." Postcard is used. Postcard is virtually pristine and intact except for slight wear at the top edge. A Fine copy. This postcard shows the Wells, Fargo & Co. Express building at the west corner of Washington and Main Streets in Columbia, California. In 1852, Wells, Fargo & Company was organized by Henry Wells and William Fargo in California. They had originally co-founded the American Express Company (now American Express) with John Warren Butterfield and had plans to expand their operations in the west. However, Butterfield and many of the American Express directors did not want to expand in California, so while simultaneously retaining their positions as directors at American Express, Wells and Fargo formed Wells, Fargo & Company in California. The Wells Fargo building on the postcard was built in 1858 and features its original brick facade and iron balcony. The town of Columbia is unique in that it is part of Columbia State Historic Park and a functioning town. Many of the buildings in the town are from the Gold Rush era during the 1850s.

    Seller Inventory # 022488

  • Eastman's Studio

    Published by Eastman's Studio

    Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Fine. Original black and white photo postcard. No date, circa 1930s-1940s. 5 1/2" x 3 1/2." Title printed at the bottom of the image. Imprint of "Eastman's Studio" in the lower-right corner of the image. "Kodak Paper" printed on the back. Postcard is unused. Postcard is virtually pristine and intact. A Fine copy. This postcard shows the former Wells Fargo office and Stewart Brothers store in Timbuctoo, California. Timbuctoo was established in 1855 amid the heyday of the California Gold Rush. Back then, Timbuctoo was the largest town in eastern Yuba County. Hydraulic mining helped bring economic prosperity to the region. However, the tailings, sediment, and pollution from the mining caused devastating economic and environmental repercussions downstream, so hydraulic mining was eventually banned in its entirety. Without the revenue generated from hydraulic mining, Timbuctoo went from a boomtown to a ghost town during the 1890s. Over the years, there have been efforts to preserve Timbuctoo and its buildings. While the Wells Fargo office depicted on the postcard had closed in 1883, it was actually restored in 1925 or 1928. However, preservation efforts fell through and the Wells Fargo office and the town as a whole have been left to the elements. Eastman's Studio was founded in 1921 by Jervie Henry Eastman (1880-1969) as Eastman & Company when he moved to Susanville, California. Eastman & Company specialized in commercial photography and postcards. In 1898, Eastman had begun his career as a professional photographer in Sisson (now Mt. Shasta), California. He later joined the Shasta View Company in 1907 before he founded his studio. In 1936, Eastman hired fellow photographer Mirl Simmons. Eastman and Simmons became business partners in 1947. Eastman retired from the business in 1959 and sold it to Simmons, who then operated the studio until his own retirement in 1980.

    Seller Inventory # 022511

  • Seller image for Original Trade Card - "Arbuckle Bros. Coffee Company, New York" for sale by Barry Cassidy Rare Books

    Arbuckle Bros. Coffee Company

    Published by Knapp & Co., New York, 1889

    Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of a young girl feeding and petting a calf. Copyright information printed below the illustration. 5" x 3." Trade card is very clean and intact. Slightly bumped corners and age toning on back. A Very Good copy. Trade card for the Arbuckle Brothers Coffee Company in New York. The back had the number ?"18" at the bottom and reads, "This is one of a Series of 50 different Subjects on Cooking." The right half on back includes four recipes for preparing veal. The left half of the back promotes the Arbackle Bros.' Ariosa coffee. Printer's information: "Knapp & Co. Lith. N.Y." Arbuckle Bros. was a coffee company founded by brothers John Arbuckle (1839-1912) and Charles Arbuckle in the 1860s. Sadly, Charles passed away at an early age. John continued to build the business and the Brooklyn factory opened in 1871. Arbuckle Bros. was once the largest coffee company in the United States. Their most famous coffee blend was Ariosa, which was the first national brand of coffee. Following the passing of John in 1912, Arbuckle family members continued to operate the business. Arbuckle Bros. stayed in the Arbuckle family until the 1930s when the company was acquired by General Foods. A separate coffee company in Arizona called Arbuckles' revived the Arbuckle name and still operates to this day. Notably, Arbuckles' still sells the Arbuckle Brothers' signature brand, Ariosa. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023171

  • Seller image for Original Trade Card - "N. H. Shepherd, Druggist and Apothecary." for sale by Barry Cassidy Rare Books
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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a black-and-white illustrated portrait of N. H .Shepherd. Circa 1882. 2 1/2" x 3 3/4." Trade card is very clean and intact. Slightly bumped corners. A Very Good copy. Title printed on front. Printed on the back are two testimonials that promote Hood's Sarsaparilla claiming that it cures catarrh and purifies the blood. Trade card for N. H. Shepherd, Druggist and Apothecary. The back advertises Dr. C. McLane's Liver Pills, likely one of the products Shepherd carried, and includes a testimonial dated September 20, 1882 in Myers, Florida from E. H. Giles. Giles claims that the liver pills work successfully as a "liver corrector" and vermifuge. Like many medicinal products of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the medicinal properties of these livers were questionable at best. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023169

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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with an illustrated color portrait of a young girl wearing a crisp-looking dress. No date, circa 1900s-1910s. 3 1/2" x 4 3/4." Trade card is very clean and intact. A few wrinkles on front and back. Back has a few small surface chips or tears that do not affect the front. A Very Good copy. Trade card for an unnamed company, likely the Niagara Starch Company in Buffalo, New York. Printer's information in the bottom margin: "Gies & Co., Buffalo, N.Y." Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023172

  • Seller image for Original Trade Card - "C. I. Hood & Co." for sale by Barry Cassidy Rare Books
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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of dogs on the front. Titled, "First Lesson," the illustration shows a mother or father dog instructing its three puppies how to catch a rat. The puppies look with attentive gazes at the rat trapped under their parent's paw. Circa 1890s. 4 3/4" x 3." Trade card is very clean and intact overall but there are pencil inscriptions on front and back and additions to the original illustration done in pencil (the parent dog is shown with an added smoking pipe in its mouth). A Good copy. Text on front: "Take Hood's Sarsaparilla; One Hundred Doses One Dollar." Printed on the back are two testimonials that promote Hood's Sarsaparilla claiming that it cures catarrh and purifies the blood. Trade card for C. I. Hood & Company based in Lowell, Massachusetts. C. I. Hood & Co. was founded in 1875 by Charles Ira Hood in Lowell. Hood offered a number of medicinal products that became popular during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Hood's products were eventually sold nationwide. His most famous product came to be Hood's Sarsaparilla. Despite their popularity, all of the company's products and their purported medicinal properties were questionable at best. In 1922, the business was sold by Hood's wife, Sarah, to William R. Warner & Co. following Hood's passing. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023168

  • Seller image for Original Trade Card - "Arbuckle Bros." for sale by Barry Cassidy Rare Books

    Arbuckle Bros.

    Publication Date: 1883

    Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a color illustration on front, titled, "Australia." The illustration shows two composite scenes. One scene depicts an Indigenous man in Australia aiming to strike a fleeing rabbit with a boomerang with four boys enjoying a local pastime of swinging from tree in a circle. The other scene is contained within a frame on which a cockatoo is perched and shows two Indigenous men on horseback with kangaroos in the foreground. Illustration is copyrighted 1883. 5" x 3." Trade card is very clean and intact on front. Back also intact but stained. A Very Good copy. Trade card for the Arbuckle Brothers Coffee Company in New York City. The back reads, "No. 32" (this card could be part of a collectable series), and includes promotional information about the Arbuckle Bros. as well as Australia. The text references how the Indigenous people of Australia were driven inland and how Australia was colonized by England. Most of the text is about the boomerang, Australian animals, and the potential for successful sports hunting in Australia. Arbuckle Bros. was a coffee company founded by brothers John Arbuckle (1839-1912) and Charles Arbuckle in the 1860s. Sadly, Charles passed away at an early age. John continued to build the business and the Brooklyn factory opened in 1871. Arbuckle Bros. was once the largest coffee company in the United States. Their most famous coffee blend was Ariosa, which was the first national brand of coffee. Following the passing of John in 1912, Arbuckle family members continued to operate the business. Arbuckle Bros. stayed in the Arbuckle family until the 1930s when the company was acquired by General Foods. A separate coffee company in Arizona called Arbuckles' revived the Arbuckle name and still operates to this day. Notably, Arbuckles' still sells the Arbuckle Brothers' signature brand, Ariosa. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023170

  • Seller image for Original Trade Card - "Lion Coffee . Manufactured by Woolson Spice Co, Toledo, Ohio" for sale by Barry Cassidy Rare Books
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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of an open box with flowers loosely propped against it. A picture of a landscape is shown on the underside of the lid. Gilt border on front. No date, circa 1890s-1910s. 4 1/2" x 3." Trade card is very clean and intact. One wrinkle at the bottom. Slight edge wear and a few small surface chips on the gilt border. A Very Good copy. Trade card for the Woolson Spice Company in Toledo, Ohio that promotes its Lion Coffee brand. Text on back: "If you want a picture card like this buy a package of Lion Coffee. It is composed of a successful combination of Mocha, Java and Rio, And is roasted with the greatest care, but is not ground. Is never sold in bulk. Beautiful picture in every package; Lion Is The King of Coffees; Manufactured by Woolson Spice Co, Toledo, Ohio." Woolson Spice Co. was founded by Alvin and William Woolson in 1882. Lion Coffee actually originated in 1864 with a separate Toledo company, C. C. Warren & Company. In 1882, Woolson Spice Co. acquired the Lion Coffee brand. The company remained in business until 1920. However, the story of Woolson Spice Co. continued when Delano West Ltd. of Hawai'i acquired the company's assets, including the Lion Coffee brand, in 1979. Lion Coffee is still sold to this day. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023173

  • Seller image for Original Trade Card - "Western Perfumery Co., San Francisco." for sale by Barry Cassidy Rare Books
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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card in the shape of a paper fan. Gilt decorations and multicolored illustration of flowers on front. Circa 1883. 5" x 3 3/4." Trade card is very clean and intact. The tip of the fan's base is chipped and missing. A Very Good copy. Trade card for the Western Perfumery Company in San Francisco, California. Text on front: "Elite Bouquet, Our Specialty; Industrial Exhibition Awarded to Western Perfumery Co., San Francisco, 1883." Text on back: "Peck's Premium Perfumes in All Odors; Compliments of: Western Perfumery Co., San Francisco. P. Peck. Perfumer-Chemist. L. Greenbaum. Proprietor." Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023167

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of bucolic landscape in a floral vignette. No date, circa 1890s-1910s. 4 1/4" x 3." Trade card is very clean and intact overall. Age toning and surface wear on back. Lower-right corner has a small chip. A Very Good copy. Trade card for a store specializing in furniture and sewing and laundry supplies, possibly by the name of Strub, located in Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023178

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Fine. Original product label with a color illustration and gilt decorative border and accents. Card has a unique, curved shape. No date, 1920s. 1 1/2" x 4." Trade card is virtually pristine and intact except for slight edge wear and light age toning on back. A Fine copy. Trade card for Dr. J. B. Lynas & Son in Logansport, Indiana that features one of their signature products, San Remo Toilet Water. J. B. Lynas & Son specialized in a number of toiletries, perfumes, and beauty products. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023179

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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of flowers growing on a wall. No date, circa 1890s-1910s. 4 1/2" x 3." Trade card is very clean and intact except for slightly bumped corners, slight edge wear, and age toning. A Very Good copy. Trade card for the Woolson Spice Company in Toledo, Ohio that promotes its Lion Coffee brand. Text on back: "If you want a picture card like this buy a package of Lion Coffee. It is composed of a successful combination of Mocha, Java and Rio, And is roasted with the greatest care, but is not ground. Is never sold in bulk. Beautiful picture in every package. Lion Is The King of Coffees. Manufactured by Woolson Spice Co., - - Toledo, Ohio." Woolson Spice Co. was founded by Alvin and William Woolson in 1882. Lion Coffee actually originated in 1864 with a separate Toledo company, C. C. Warren & Company. In 1882, Woolson Spice Co. acquired the Lion Coffee brand. The company remained in business until 1920. However, the story of Woolson Spice Co. continued when Delano West Ltd. of Hawai'i acquired the company's assets, including the Lion Coffee brand, in 1979. Lion Coffee is still sold to this day. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023175

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Fine. Original product label with a color illustration of a soap bar and gilt decorative border and accents. Card has a unique, curved shape. No date, 1910s-1920s. 1 1/2" x 4." Trade card is virtually pristine and intact except for slight age toning and offsetting on back. A Fine copy. Trade card for Dr. J. B. Lynas & Son in Logansport, Indiana that features one of their signature products, Witch Hazel Glycerine Soap. J. B. Lynas & Son specialized in a number of toiletries, perfumes, and beauty products. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023182

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of four children wearing period swimwear and playing in the water on the beach. No date, 1890s-1910s. 4 1/4" x 3." Trade card is very clean and intact overall except for age toning, slight wrinkling, and a few small pieces of paper stuck to the back. A Very Good copy. Trade card for the Scott Brothers in Allegheny, Pennsylvania. The proprietors are listed as Chas. B. Scott and Wilf. F. Scott. The title lists several of their wares for sale which are mostly toys and entertainment items. Among them, a velocipede, the early bicycle. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023186

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Fine. Original product label with a color illustration and gilt decorative border and accents. Card has a unique, curved shape. No date, 1910s-1920s. 2" x 3 1/4." Trade card is virtually pristine and intact except for age toning on back. A Fine copy. Trade card for Dr. J. B. Lynas & Son in Logansport, Indiana that features one of their signature products, Langtry Balm. The card includes instructions on how to use the ointment which they claim is higher in quality than dry face powders. J. B. Lynas & Son specialized in a number of toiletries, perfumes, and beauty products. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023180

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of a girl or young lady holding a pot of flowers in what may be a courtyard. No date, 1890s-1910s. 3 1/4" x 6." Trade card is clean and intact overall but has slight rippling throughout and has parts of another publication that got stuck to it. Illustration is mostly intact. A Good copy. Trade card for the Fleishman Brothers and their "City of Paris" store in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Additional text on back includes their two other locations in New York and Paris and denotes their specialty as "Millinery, Trimmings and Fancy Goods." Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023183

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of a comedic scene titled, "The Firecrackers Explode--A Soul Stirring Climax." The scene involves two men, a boy, and a dog and shows their thwarted plan after firecrackers went off. One of the men is doubled over and has face-planted in a box of Fairbank's "Lakeside" Soap. The top of the illustration reads, "Buy Fairbank's 'Lakeside' Soap and Use No Other." No date, 1890s-1910s. 3" x 4 1/2." Trade card is very clean and intact overall except for age toning, slight wrinkling, and a few marks on front and back. A Very Good copy. Trade card for H. J. Speyerers in Rochester, Pennsylvania. The card promotes some of the items this dealer carried, namely, Fairbank's Lakeside Soap and Fairbank's Fine Family Soaps. Fairbank's Soaps originated with N. K. Fairbank Company, a business that specialized in food, soap, and animal products. The company was founded by Chicago businessman Nathaniel Kellogg Fairbank (1829-1903). Among Fairbank's line of soaps was his famous "Fairy Soap." The text on back reads, "Fairbank's Fine Family Soaps; None Better or Purer Made, Try Them; For Sale by H. J. Speyerers, Dealer in Staple and Fancy Groceries, Rochester, PA." Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023185

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of a domestic scene showing two women, two children, and a dog at leisure in a bucolic setting. No date, 1890s. 5 1/2" x 2 3/4." Trade card is very clean and intact overall except for slight edge wear and a few small bits of paper from another material that got stuck (mostly limited to the back). A Very Good copy. Trade card for E. P. Brobeck, a druggist in Rochester, Pennsylvania. The card has two purple stamps from Brobeck on front and back. This card promotes one of the items Brobeck carried, Ayer's Sarsaparilla, as manufactured by J. C. Ayer & Company. J. C. Ayer & Co. was founded by James Cook Ayer (1818-1878) in Lowell, Massachusetts. Ayer opened his own apothecary in 1841. Based on online resources, it is estimated that Ayer's Sarsaparilla was first released between c. 1840 and c. 1855. The text on back lauds the sarsaparilla's purported medicinal properties including being a blood purifier. Like many medicines during this time, Ayer's Sarsaparilla's effectiveness as a medicine was questionable at best. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023184

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Near Fine (Near Fi. Original trade card with a color illustration of a flower bouquet set against a gilt background. Title printed on an illustration of a card placed among the flowers. No date, circa 1890s-1910s. 4" x 2 1/2." Trade card is very clean and intact except for age toning on front and back and bumped corners. A Near Fine copy. Trade card for George S. Haines, a trunk maker in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023177

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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Fine. Original product label with a black-and-white illustration and gilt decorative border and accents. Card has a unique, curved shape. No date, 1910s-1920s. 2" x 4." Trade card is virtually pristine and intact except for age toning on front and back. A Fine copy. Trade card for the Parisian perfume company, J. Locard. The card promotes one of their products, "A La Reine Des Pres" Eau de Toilette. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023181

  • Merten Moffitt & Co.

    Published by Schmidt Label & Lith. Co., San Francisco, CA

    Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of a girl holding a parasol surrounded by different fruits on the right and flowers on the left. No date, circa 1890s. 4 1/2" x 3 1/4." Printer's information in bottom margin on front: "Schmidt Label & Lith. Co. S.F." Trade card is very clean and intact overall. Age toning to front and back. Bumped corners. A few small surface tears on back not affecting the front. A Very Good copy. Trade card for Merten Moffit & Company in San Francisco, California. The company's speciality is printed on the girl's parasol, "Flavoring Extracts." Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated businesses. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023174

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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of a two-faced woman with the caption, "Sweet Sixteen and Sixty." Gilt background and accents on illustration. No date, circa 1870s. 2 3/4" x 4 1/4." Text on front: "Registered by Jus. Koehler, N.Y.; W. G. Dunseath, Jeweler, 150 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA. My Specialty, Hand adjusted Watches." Trade card is very clean and intact overall. There is a hole in the top-center which affects the illustration but it may be original. A few light stains on front and back. A Very Good copy. Trade card for W. G. Dunseath, a jeweler and watchmaker at 150 Fifth Avenue in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. William G. Dunseath (c. 1841-?) was in the jewelry and watchmaking business from circa 1862-1898. According to online resources, he may have learned the trade from his father. William's store changed locations several times during his career, but he remained in Pittsburgh. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023176

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Fine. Text is in German. Original trade card with a color illustration a scene from Homer's Odyssey. Odysseus is shown tied to the mast of his ship to protect himself as it rides past the rocks inhabited by sirens, who are depicted in the foreground seeking to bring the crew to their watery graves. An explanation of the myth is on the back. No date, circa 1910s-1930s. 2 3/4" x 4 1/2." Trade card is virtually pristine and intact. A Fine copy. Trade card for Liebig's Extract of Meat Company that promotes its meat (beef) extract. The number "3" of this card suggests it may be part of a collectable series. The story of Liebig's began when German chemist Justus von Liebig (1803-1873) made a concentrated beef extract in 1847. Liebig promoted the extract as an economical way to consume beef. In 1865, Liebig's Extract of Meat Company was officially established in London. The beef extract became the company's signature product and achieved much popularity in middle-class European households by the 1860s. However, the extract's selling point as a beef substitute shifted to a flavoring ingredient when scientists proved the extract had little to no nutritive value. The company released more products over the years including the OXO brand bouillon cube in 1911. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023192

  • J. & P. Coats

    Published by Auchincloss & Bro., New York, 1881

    Seller: Barry Cassidy Rare Books, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A.
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    No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Very Good. Original trade card with a color illustration of a mother riding a swing with her daughter as her son holds the rope of the swing. The rope acts as a visual cue toward the spool of J. & P. Coats thread in the foreground, indicating the strength and durability of the company's thread. Needle and thread numbers for the company's different sewing machines on back. Copyrighted 1881 Auchincloss & Bro., New York. 3" x 4 1/4." Trade card is very clean and intact except for age toning and a few pieces of paper stuck to the front and back (mostly on the back). A Very Good copy. Trade card for J. & P. Coats. The story of J. & P. Coats begins in 1802 when James Coats, Sr. opened a weaving business in Paisley, Scotland. In 1826, James, Sr. established a cotton mill in Ferguslie to produce his own thread. His sons, James and Peter, took over the business upon his retirement in 1830 and renamed it J & P. Coats. The company had a predecessor in Paisley called the Clark Thread Company which was founded by James and Patrick Clark in 1755. Over the years, J. & P. Coats underwent a number of mergers with other companies including the Clark Thread Co. Coats & Clark Incorporated was formed in 1952. There were subsequent mergers after this, but the trade name of J. & P. Coats is still used to this day. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023187

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Fine. Text is in Dutch. Original trade card with a color illustration of an Indigenous woman in Papua New Guinea holding her child on her back. Homes in the background. No date, circa 1910s-1930s. 2 3/4" x 4 1/2." Trade card is virtually pristine and intact. A Fine copy. Trade card for Liebig's Extract of Meat Company that promotes its bouillon cubes. This card also describes the people and country of Papua New Guinea from a Western perspective. The number "5" of this card suggests it may be part of a collectable series. The story of Liebig's began when German chemist Justus von Liebig (1803-1873) made a concentrated beef extract in 1847. Liebig promoted the extract as an economical way to consume beef. In 1865, Liebig's Extract of Meat Company was officially established in London. The beef extract became the company's signature product and achieved much popularity in middle-class European households by the 1860s. However, the extract's selling point as a beef substitute shifted to a flavoring ingredient when scientists proved the extract had little to no nutritive value. The company released more products over the years including the OXO brand bouillon cube in 1911. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023191

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Fine. Text is in German. Original trade card with a color illustration of a scene from Homer's Odyssey. Odysseus is shown chopping at a tree with an axe so he can build a raft and leave the island of Ogygia and return home. An explanation of the myth is on the back. No date, circa 1910s-1930s. 2 3/4" x 4 1/2." Trade card is virtually pristine and intact. A Fine copy. Trade card for Liebig's Extract of Meat Company that promotes its meat (beef) extract. The number "4" of this card suggests it may be part of a collectable series. The story of Liebig's began when German chemist Justus von Liebig (1803-1873) made a concentrated beef extract in 1847. Liebig promoted the extract as an economical way to consume beef. In 1865, Liebig's Extract of Meat Company was officially established in London. The beef extract became the company's signature product and achieved much popularity in middle-class European households by the 1860s. However, the extract's selling point as a beef substitute shifted to a flavoring ingredient when scientists proved the extract had little to no nutritive value. The company released more products over the years including the OXO brand bouillon cube in 1911. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, some trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023193

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Fine. Text is in German. Original trade card with a color illustration of a scene from Homer's Odyssey. Odysseus is shown clinging to a part of his shipwreck while Leukothea comes to his rescue. She gives him an enchanted veil that allows him to reach the shore so he can continue on his journey home to the island of Ithaca. An explanation of the myth is on the back. No date, circa 1910s-1930s. 4 1/2" x 2 3/4." Trade card is virtually pristine and intact. A Fine copy. Trade card for Liebig's Extract of Meat Company that promotes its meat (beef) extract. The number "5" of this card suggests it may be part of a collectable series. The story of Liebig's began when German chemist Justus von Liebig (1803-1873) made a concentrated beef extract in 1847. Liebig promoted the extract as an economical way to consume beef. In 1865, Liebig's Extract of Meat Company was officially established in London. The beef extract became the company's signature product and achieved much popularity in middle-class European households by the 1860s. However, the extract's selling point as a beef substitute shifted to a flavoring ingredient when scientists proved the extract had little to no nutritive value. The company released more products over the years including the OXO brand bouillon cube in 1911. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, some trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023204

  • No Binding. Condition: Collectible-Fine. Text is in German. Original trade card with a color illustration of a scene from Homer's Odyssey. Polyphemus is shown about to throw a boulder at Odysseus's ship after Odysseus gouged his eye and flees the island. An explanation of the myth is on the back. No date, circa 1910s-1930s. 4 1/2" x 2 3/4." Trade card is virtually pristine and intact. A Fine copy. Trade card for Liebig's Extract of Meat Company that promotes its meat (beef) extract. The number "1" of this card suggests it may be part of a collectable series. The story of Liebig's began when German chemist Justus von Liebig (1803-1873) made a concentrated beef extract in 1847. Liebig promoted the extract as an economical way to consume beef. In 1865, Liebig's Extract of Meat Company was officially established in London. The beef extract became the company's signature product and achieved much popularity in middle-class European households by the 1860s. However, the extract's selling point as a beef substitute shifted to a flavoring ingredient when scientists proved the extract had little to no nutritive value. The company released more products over the years including the OXO brand bouillon cube in 1911. Trade cards were antique business cards that first became popular during the late seventeenth century in Paris and Lyon, France and London, England. Trade cards were often given by business owners and proprietors to patrons and customers as a way to promote their businesses. Prior to the use of street addresses, some trade cards had maps so clients could locate the associated business. Many of these cards also incorporated elaborate designs, illustrations, and other decorative features. Trade cards became popular in the United States during the nineteenth century in the period after the Civil War. The late nineteenth century also saw the advent of trade card collecting as a hobby. While they are no longer in use, trade cards influenced the formation of trading cards and were the predecessors of modern-day business cards.

    Seller Inventory # 023206