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  • Viola, Herman J. [et al, eds]

    Published by Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, 1985

    Seller: William Reese Company - Americana, New Haven, CT, U.S.A.
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    303pp. Illus. Quarto. Original pictorial wrappers. Light wear at extremities. Very good. A well illustrated work on the U.S. Exploring Expedition of 1838-42, led by Lieut. Charles Wilkes.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM38047

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    xv,[1],232pp. plus illustrations. Frontis. Original blue cloth, gilt-stamped cover, gilt-lettered spine. As new. In dust jacket. Poynter's journal is believed to be the only first-hand account of the voyage to survive.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM30632

  • Conrad, L.J.

    Published by Washougal, Wa, 1999

    Seller: William Reese Company - Americana, New Haven, CT, U.S.A.
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    xv,424,[1]pp. Quarto. Blue cloth. New. From an edition of 1000 copies. An excellent new Antarctic bibliography, with useful references to recent scholarly material and some good annotations.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM25865

  • lvi,431,[3]pp. plus five plates (one colored, one folding), and one folding map. 12mo. Original green boards, with printed paper label. Spine lightly soiled, some wear to hinges. Some light foxing, first signature loose. Very good. An illustrated geographical work covering parts of South America, Russia, and Asia. The author, born Johann Gottfried Volte, was a writer and teacher whose main interest was geography. Accordingly, he published a "pocketbook for the dissemination of geographical knowledge," which began publication in 1823 and continued until his death in 1848. This volume includes a section on Peru, Valparaiso, Chile, as well as a chapter on Weddell's voyage to the South Pole. Illustrations include views of Lima and Valparaiso, and a map of the South Shetland Islands.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM40895

  • Markham, Clements R.

    Published by At the University Press, Cambridge, 1921

    Seller: William Reese Company - Americana, New Haven, CT, U.S.A.
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    xii,539pp. plus plates and maps, some folding. Quarto. Blue publisher's cloth, stamped in silver. Boards rubbed, with small ink stains, moderate shelf wear. Spine ends worn, with foot repaired, front hinge cracked but holding. Bookplate on front pastedown. Text tanned, frontis lightly foxed. Good plus. The final book by geographer and explorer Clements Robert Markham, completed and published five years after his death. A comprehensive account of Arctic and Antarctic expeditions through Danish explorations of Greenland in 1908 and Scott's final journey to the South Pole in 1912. "Markham's active involvement in Polar exploration spanned 60 years (ranging from participant to masterminding Scott's first expedition). Highly acclaimed upon publication, it remains one of the most important contributions on the subject" - Conrad. ARCTIC BIBLIOGRAPHY 10939. CONRAD, pp.117,182. SPENCE 755. RENARD 990, 991.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM51959

  • 56pp. Gathered signatures, stitched. Last leaf detached, first four leaves slighty soiled, uniform browning. Good. Charles Wilkes' defense against charges of insubordination, disrespect, disobedience, and behavior unbecoming an officer stemming from his short temper and repeated personal conflicts with the Naval Department. While serving as acting rear admiral in the West Indies during the Civil War, Wilkes proved ineffective in capturing rebel ships harassing northern traders, though he became adept at offending foreign ministers who claimed he repeatedly violated neutrality laws. This behavior led to his being recalled to Washington. Shortly thereafter it was discovered that Wilkes was actually three years older than his official records stated, and he was subsequently demoted from commodore to captain. This demotion, combined with an already strained relationship with Secretary of the Navy Welles, led to repeated conflicts of the sort that yielded the present court-martial. Wilkes defends his actions on the grounds that at no point did the Secretary ever communicate his displeasure with Wilkes directly, and that Wilkes' communications with Welles were firm and direct, but not disrespectful. An eloquent explanation in Wilkes' own words of an important chapter in the famous explorer's post-expedition career. EBERSTADT 155:207. DAB XX, p.217.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM29595

  • Seller image for FOUR YEARS IN THE GOVERNMENT EXPEDITION; COMMANDED BY CAPTAIN CHARLES WILKES, TO THE ISLAND OF MADEIRA - CAPE VERD ISLANDS - BRAZIL - COAST OF PATAGONIA - CHILI - PERU - PAUMATO GROUP - SOCIETY ISLANDS - NAVIGATOR GROUP - AUSTRALIA - ANTARCTIC CONTINENT - NEW ZEALAND - FRIENDLY ISLANDS - FEJEE GROUP - SANDWICH ISLANDS - NORTHWEST COAST OF AMERICA - OREGON - CALIFORNIA. for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

    371,[2]pp. Seventeen plates (fourteen of them within the pagination). Frontis. Original publisher's cloth, stamped in blind and gilt. Light soiling to boards, minor wear at extremities. Contemporary owner's inscription on fly leaf. Text lightly foxed. Very good. Second edition, after the first of the previous year. "Colvocoresses, a naval officer, saw extensive service throughout the world, including taking part in the overland expedition of the Wilkes expedition in 1841 from Vancouver Island to San Francisco. He was mysteriously murdered in Bridgeport, Connecticut, thirty years later" - Hill. His account, based on a journal he kept during his travels, is a most readable overview of the people, scenery, and events encountered by the Wilkes expedition. Illustrated with many nice engravings of west coast scenes, whales, icebergs, the Hawaiian palm tree, the "Puebla of Los Angeles," and many natural history subjects. This second edition contains only seventeen plates, whereas the very rare first edition contains nineteen. One of the plates that has been excluded from this edition would comprise pages 319 and 320, which accounts for the lack of those page numbers in this edition (the text is complete). Several of the plates in this edition are also printed on "brownish parchment-like paper" as noted by Rosove. This is one of the rarest Wilkes expedition narratives. HASKELL 115. HOWES C635. HILL 347 (another ed). SABIN 14907. COWAN, p.138. SPENCE 310. RADER 878. BORBA DE MORAES, p.194. FORBES 1854 (another ed). ROSOVE ANTARCTIC 74.B1.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM40036

  • Seller image for VOYAGE AU CAP DE BONNE-ESPERANCE, ET AUTOUR DU MONDE AVEC LE CAPITAINE COOK, ET PRINCIPALEMENT DANS LE PAY DES HOTTENTOTS ET DES CAFFRES for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

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    Three volumes. xxxii,388; [4],366; [4],363pp., plus sixteen engraved plates (some folding) and large engraved folding map. Uniform contemporary calf, spines gilt, leather labels. Some very minor rubbing at extremities. A fresh and especially handsome set. With the bookplate of Nils Rosen in each volume, as well as New York Horticultural Society bookplate on front fly leaf of each volume, noting Kenneth K. Mackenzie's bequest of the book. The first French edition, translated from the original Swedish. Sparrman, a zoologist from the University of Uppsala, was at the Cape when Cook's second expedition arrived, and from 1772 to 1775 he accompanied that party on its famous reconnaissance of the South Pacific. He gives an account of this in the present work. Most of the book is devoted to his experiences in Africa in 1772, 1775, and 1776. An important work of natural history and South Africa material, as well as an interesting account of the Cook expedition. This edition contains a beautiful engraved map of the Cape of Good Hope and sixteen engraved plates of natural history subjects. HILL 1615 (ref).

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM22848

  • Seller image for TYPED LETTER, SIGNED ("DICK"), FROM RICHARD BYRD TO POLAN BANKS, DISCUSSING BYRD'S EXPERIENCES IN THE WAR, THE POSSIBLITY OF A FILM BEING MADE OF HIS LIFE, AND HIS DESIRE TO RETURN TO ANTARCTICA] for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

    [2]pp. on letterhead of "Naval Department / Office of the Chief of Naval Operations." Accompanied by the mailing envelope. Quarto. Fine. In a half morocco and cloth folding box, leather labels. An engaging and informative letter, in which Richard Byrd describes some of his World War II experiences with the Navy, discusses the possibility of a motion picture being made about his life and adventures, and mentions his plans for a return to the South Pole. It is clear from the tone of the letter that Byrd and Polan Banks shared a warm friendship. Byrd's letter is on Navy Department stationery, but he wrote it while he was in Boston. During World War II, Captain Polan Banks served as chief of the War Department's stage and screen section. After the war Banks completed a novel, entitled CARRIAGE ENTRANCE, a melodrama set among the Creole aristocracy of New Orleans. The book was published by Putnam in 1947 and made into the film, MY FORBIDDEN PAST, in 1951. In this letter Byrd compliments Banks on the completion of the novel, asks about its forthcoming publication, and requests that Banks send him a copy. Byrd moves on to discuss his aversion to public acclaim, despite his fame as a polar explorer: "As you have noted, I am still keeping out of the limelight. Perhaps I am making a mistake. My friends tell me so. I have refused publicity on the medal recently awarded me for my work at the front. The Department set three dates for the presentation to me but I postponed it. Perhaps I will reconsider, since apparently a number of people think that I have departed the earth to explore another world. Congress voted a medal for our last expedition, and on account of my men I may allow some publicity when it is presented." Byrd then brings up the subject of a biographical movie based on his life, which Banks had proposed before, and discusses his experiences in the Pacific at the close of the war, including "the Okinawa campaign (it was the hottest of the war), the Kamakazes [sic], the daily attacks on the Japanese mainland from the carriers, the signing of the Peace Terms on the Missouri, getting ashore with the first amphibious forces, inspecting the atomic bomb damage, strategic bombing, etc., etc." Byrd closes by stating that "I am still determined to go back to the South Pole next November and will get working on that proposition as soon as I get a few weeks letup." Richard Byrd would indeed soon return to the Antarctic, in command of the Navy's "Operation Highjump" in late 1946 and into 1947.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM42205

  • Seller image for VOYAGES OF DISCOVERY IN THE ARCTIC AND ANTARCTIC SEAS, AND ROUND THE WORLD: BEING PERSONAL NARRATIVES OF ATTEMPTS TO REACH THE NORTH AND SOUTH POLES; AND OF AN OPEN-BOAT EXPEDITION UP THE WELLINGTON CHANNEL IN SEARCH OF SIR JOHN FRANKLIN. for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

    Two volumes. xx,432; xii,412pp., plus sixty- six plates and maps (six folding). Half-title in second volume. 20th-century three-quarter speckled calf and cloth, spines gilt, gilt leather labels, all edges marbled, marbled endpapers. Minimal wear to boards. Bookplate of Alfred Edward Moxon (possibly a member of the English Moxon publishing family) on front pastedown of first volume. Text somewhat toned, as usual, minor foxing. Splits along folds of map in second volume expertly repaired. Very good. An important work by McCormick, the surgeon during Ross' 1839-43 Antarctic expedition, taken from his own diaries written during the expedition, and published at his own expense at age eighty-four. The work also includes McCormick's experiences with John Franklin, first as surgeon on Peary's 1827 attempt to reach the North Pole and during his own voyage to Wellington Channel in search of Franklin in 1852-53, which includes McCormick's boat expedition. "In addition, he includes some plans for reaching the poles and preservation of health in the polar regions, an autobiography, plus correspondence and miscellany. Included are numerous outstanding illustrations based on McCormick's own pencil sketches, including five panoramas from the Ross expedition.Very scarce" - Rosove. "McCormick served under Parry and Ross, and took a prominent part in the Franklin search expedition of 1852-3. This personal narrative covers all these as well as his other voyages" - Scribner. A rare work, as McCormick financed the publishing himself, resulting in an initial print run of only 750 copies. This is an early issue, without the 16pp. "Memorandums" that was added later. ARCTIC BIBLIOGRAPHY 10582. ROSOVE 221. TPL 3093. SPENCE 747. TAURUS 10. SCRIBNER 101:1288.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM55324

  • Seller image for A VOYAGE ROUND THE WORLD, IN HIS BRITANNIC MAJESTY'S SLOOP, RESOLUTION, COMMANDED BY CAPT. JAMES COOK DURING THE YEARS 1772, 3, 4, AND 5 for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

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    Two volumes. xviii,[2],602,[1]; [4],607pp., including errata leaf, plus large folding map. Quarto. Contemporary speckled calf, rebacked with original gilt leather labels preserved, raised bands, corners renewed. Minor shelf wear, one contemporary and one modern bookplate on pastedowns, institutional bookplates on verso of titlepages. Minor occasional foxing, some penciled marginalia and underlining to text. Very good. Forster's important account of Cook's second voyage, and an essential component of the record of that great expedition. Forster and his father, John Reinhold, served as official botanists during the expedition. When the Admiralty decided to prevent the elder Forster from contributing to the official report, George produced his own publication, preceding the official account by several weeks. The Admiralty commissioned Cook to undertake his second voyage in the wake of the great success of the first expedition. The purpose of the second voyage was to circumnavigate the globe as far to the south as possible, searching for any southern land masses previously unknown. Cook proved that "Terra Australis," which was supposed to lie between South America and New Zealand, was nonexistent; but the party became the first to traverse the Antarctic Circle, and discovered and rediscovered islands in the Pacific. "For all the controversy A VOYAGE ROUND THE WORLD is an interesting and important account that complements the official one with facts and astute observations on the human side of the voyage" - Rosove. Davidson describes this account as "an important work and a necessary supplement to the official account." HILL 625. BEDDIE 1247. HOLMES 23. SABIN 25130. SPENCE 464. DAVIDSON, pp.61-62. ROSOVE ANTARCTIC 132.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM54751

  • Seller image for A NARRATIVE OF THE LIFE, TRAVELS AND SUFFERINGS OF THOMAS W. SMITH: COMPRISING AN ACCOUNT OF HIS EARLY LIFE, ADOPTION BY THE GIPSYS [sic]; HIS TRAVELS DURING EIGHTEEN VOYAGES TO VARIOUS PARTS OF THE WORLD, DURING WHICH HE WAS FIVE TIMES SHIPWRECKED; THRICE ON A DESOLATE ISLAND NEAR THE SOUTH POLE, ONCE ON THE COAST OF ENGLAND, AND ONCE ON THE COAST OF AFRICA for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

    240pp. Contemporary calf, spine gilt. Boards somewhat scuffed, light wear to edges and corners. Front hinge repaired, front free endpaper refreshed. Occasional light foxing and dampstaining. About very good. Smith was born of respectable British parents, but after his father died he was sent to work as an errand boy at age seven, and not unlike other young men in his situation, he soon found himself at sea. He participated in seven whaling voyages to the Pacific from 1816 to 1832, as well as numerous other sea adventures all over the world, including the South Pacific, the Atlantic coast of South America, Africa, and the Antarctic regions. Rosove notes that the work has been missed by many bibliographers because it is "so rare and little known." Besides whaling, Smith took part in hunting elephant seals on South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands in 1816-18, and whaling and sealing on the South Shetland Islands in 1820. This visit, only a year after the discovery of the islands, is the earliest account of sealing there, and an important early Antarctic narrative, with harrowing tales of surviving on penguin hearts and livers and contesting territory with other sealers. Smith also describes a voyage from London to Cape Horn, then to Juan Fernandez and the Galapagos, Easter Island, and points in South America including Colombia and Panama. Later, in New Zealand, he describes scrapes with natives, witnessing battles between the Whorowrarians and Kivakivians. He also visited Japan, Guam, and other Pacific islands. He gives details of whaling activities, including advice on "the most expeditious way of killing a whale" (pp.228- 229). Smith made further whaling voyages to the Pacific Ocean in the 1820s aboard the British whalers Spring, Grove, and Hibernia. He ended up trying to do good in New Bedford, but debt and a lung ailment prevented him from achieving his dream of becoming a minister. A rare book, not in the Hill Collection. The Brooke-Hitching copy realized approximately $21,000 at his sale in September 2015. HUNTRESS 331C. FORSTER 86. SPENCE 1139 (listing an 1840 ed., an error in dating). ROSOVE 312. HOWES S679.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM52318A

  • Seller image for NARRATIVE OF THE UNITED STATES EXPLORING EXPEDITION. DURING THE YEARS 1838, 1839, 1840, 1841, 1842 for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

    Wilkes, Charles

    Published by Lea and Blanchard, Philadelphia, 1845

    Seller: William Reese Company - Americana, New Haven, CT, U.S.A.
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    Five text volumes plus atlas volume. lx,434; xv,476; xv,438; xvi,539; xv,558pp., plus sixty-four engraved plates, nine double-page maps, numerous vignette illustrations. Atlas: five folding maps (one handcolored). Half title in each text volume. Imperial octavo. Original gilt cloth. Cloth worn at corners, spine ends, and along hinges. Early ownership signature on titlepage of each volume. Scattered foxing, occasional offsetting. Minor splits at cross-folds of maps in atlas volume, but with no loss. A very good set. This is the first regularly available trade edition of the narrative of the Wilkes expedition, preceded only by the extremely rare official edition and the further printing of 150 copies made for gifts. The Wilkes Expedition was the first United States scientific expedition by sea, working mainly in the Pacific Ocean. Wilkes sailed along the Antarctic continent and throughout the islands of the South Pacific, visited the Hawaiian Islands in 1840, and explored the northwest coast of America in 1841. The expedition was made up of a number of notable American scientists, and their botanical, natural history, and geological findings are included. The United States Exploring Expedition "was the first American scientific expedition of any size, charged to 'extend the bounds of Science and promote the acquisition of knowledge,' and was one of the most ambitious Pacific expeditions ever attempted" (Forbes). "The chief fields of exploration in this expedition were the coast of the Antarctic continent, the islands of the Pacific Ocean, and the American northwest coast. In total some 280 islands in the Pacific and adjacent waters and 800 miles of streams and coasts in the Oregon country were surveyed, and 1,600 miles of the coast of Antarctica were charted. After leaving Hampton Roads in 1838, the expedition visited Madeira, the Cape Verde Islands, Brazil, Patagonia, the South Shetland Islands, Peter Island, Chile, and Peru, before proceeding to the Tuamotu or the low Archipelago, the Samoa Islands, and New South Wales. From Sydney, Wilkes sailed into the region now known as Wilkesland. He visited Tonga, the Fiji group, and the Hawaiian Islands in 1840, and in 1841 explored the west coast of North America. Much valuable information is given on the Columbia River, the Willamette Valley, Puget Sound, the Strait of Juan de Fuca, and the Sacramento Valley, and the findings on the northwest coast of America proved timely in light of the dispute with Great Britain over the Oregon Territory. The Wilkes expedition also visited San Francisco bay and the Sacramento River. Crossing the Pacific, Wilkes called at the Philippine Islands, the Sulu Archipelago, Borneo, Singapore, and, rounding the Cape of Good Hope, finally reached New York in 1842, having sailed round the world" - Hill. HOWES W414, "aa." STREETER SALE 3324. TWENEY 89, 83. HILL 1867. TAXONOMIC LITERATURE 17646. HASKELL 2B. SABIN 103994. FORBES 1574. ROSOVE ANTARCTIC 353. FERGUSON 4209. COWAN, p.683. REESE, BEST OF THE WEST 85.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM38365

  • Seller image for CHARACTERES GENERUM PLANTARUM, QUAS IN ITINERE AD INSULAS MARIS AUSTRALIS, COLLEGERUNT, DESCRIPSERUNT, DELINEARUNT, ANNIS 1772 - 1775 for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

    Forster, Joannes Reinoldus and Georgius

    Published by B. White, T. Cadell, & P. Elmsly, London, 1776

    Seller: William Reese Company - Americana, New Haven, CT, U.S.A.
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    x,[2],viii,150,[3]pp. plus seventy-eight engraved plates. Quarto. Antique-style three-quarter calf and contemporary marbled boards, spine gilt, leather label. Titlepage slightly soiled and cleaned, some scattered stains, else a nice copy. First edition, first issue of this important botanical work on Australia and New Zealand, also published in a folio edition of eight copies the same year. This was the first scientific work, in fact one of the earliest publications of any kind, published as a result of Cook's second voyage. It lists the botanical discoveries made during the voyage, following a Linnaean classification system. The descriptions are by Anders Sparrman, and the engravings are after drawings by the younger Forster. The Forsters, father and son, travelled as scientists on the second voyage. CHARACTERES. was one of the earliest publications resulting from that journey. Marra's surreptitious narrative had been published the previous year, and in 1776 only this and the anonymously written SECOND VOYAGE ROUND THE WORLD appeared. In 1777 both the Forsters' narrative and the official account by Cook were published, along with Wales and Bayly's ASTRONOMICAL OBSERVATIONS, followed a year later by the Forsters' OBSERVATIONS. The rush to get CHARACTERES in print should probably be seen in the light of the quarrel with the Admiralty over the Forsters' claims to publishing rights for their official account of the voyage. This preemptive scientific publication may well have been intended to show the strength of the Forster claim. The Forsters' intellectual arrogance has earned them considerable ridicule, including some criticism of the present work "owing to the minute scale on which the plants were drawn as compared with the size of the paper" (Holmes). The Hill catalogue notes, "it has been said to be the foundation of our knowledge of New Zealand, Antarctic and Polynesian vegetation.," but scientifically it is now seen as rather slight. Nevertheless, the book is one of the earliest sources of our knowledge of the plants of Australia and Polynesia, it has considerable significance for the history of Cook's second voyage, and it is one of a perhaps surprisingly small number of monuments to the major scientific achievements of the three voyages. BEDDIE 1385. HILL 627. HOLMES 17. NISSEN BBI 644. PRITZEL 2981. SABIN 25134. ROSOVE ANTARCTIC 139.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM30043

  • Seller image for JOURNAL OF THE RESOLUTION'S VOYAGE, IN 1772, 1773, 1774, AND 1775. ON DISCOVERY TO THE SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE, BY WHICH THE NON EXISTENCE OF AN UNDISCOVERED CONTINENT.IS DEMONSTRATIVELY PROVED. ALSO A JOURNAL OF THE ADVENTURE'S VOYAGE, IN THE YEARS 1772, 1773, AND 1774. WITH AN ACCOUNT OF THE SEPARATION OF THE TWO SHIPS. for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

    xiii,[1],328pp. plus folding map and five plates. Modern paneled calf, gilt leather label. Light dampstaining to a few leaves, some minor foxing. Offsetting from plates. Very good. The earliest published complete account of Cook's second voyage, issued at least eighteen months prior to the official version. The second voyage included the first crossing of the Antarctic Circle, making Marra's narrative the earliest firsthand account of the Antarctic, and the engraved plates are the first depictions of that region. Due to the strict regulations against private publications, the work was published anonymously, but the identity of the author did not remain a mystery for long. "Correspondence between Cook and the Admiralty shows that the author was John Marra, one of the gunners' mates in the Resolution. He was an Irishman whom Cook had picked up at Batavia during the first voyage. He made an abortive attempt to desert at Tahiti on 14 May 1774, an escapade of which Cook took so lenient a view that he says - 'I know not if he might have obtained my consent, if he had applied for it in proper time.' This did not, however, as Marra states at p.241, prevent his being put in irons." - Holmes. This copy contains the extremely rare extra folding map, "Part of the Tropical Discoveries of the Resolution Sloop Captain J. Cook in 1774," which is noted by Beddie and Rosove but not called for in most of the references. This map has, however, been present in three of the twenty-five copies of the first edition sold at auction in the last thirty or so years. The chart appears opposite the first page of text and shows New Caledonia and the Great Cyclades islands to the north and Norfolk Island to the south. It is a most interesting production and is to be found in two states: first, as here with the engraver's name and with the position of Norfolk Island incorrectly placed 4° too far south; and second, with the engraver's name erased (but just visible), with the Norfolk Island's latitude corrected. The chart follows two of the Gilbert manuscript charts in spelling Ballabeah Isle with a final "h," unlike all the other manuscript charts. We have a definite date for the corrected issue of this chart, as it accompanied the article, "Late Voyages of the Resolution and Adventure," published in the GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE, Vol. XLVI, 1776 (edited by David Henry), opposite page 120 in the March issue. Therefore, it seems probable that the uncorrected chart found its way into copies of Marra issued during the last two or three months of 1775. "A rare work.contain[ing] details of many events not recorded in the official account, and a preface recording the causes which led Banks and his staff to withdraw from the expedition at the last moment. Accordingly it is a vital second voyage item." - Davidson. BAGNALL 630. ROSOVE 214.A1.b. KROEPELIEN 809. BEAGLEHOLE II, pp.cliii-clv. BEDDIE 1270. SPENCE 758. DAVIDSON, p.60. HOLMES 16. O'REILLY & REITMAN 379. KAEPPLER 29. HOCKEN, p.14. HILL 1087. CONRAD, p.13. STREETER SALE 2408. SABIN 16247.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM38463A

  • Seller image for JOURNAL OF THE RESOLUTION'S VOYAGE, IN 1772, 1773, 1774, AND 1775. ON DISCOVERY TO THE SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE, BY WHICH THE NON EXISTENCE OF AN UNDISCOVERED CONTINENT.IS DEMONSTRATIVELY PROVED. ALSO A JOURNAL OF THE ADVENTURE'S VOYAGE, IN THE YEARS 1772, 1773, AND 1774. WITH AN ACCOUNT OF THE SEPARATION OF THE TWO SHIPS. for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

    xiii,[1],328pp. plus folding map and five plates. With an additional folding map, "Part of the Tropical Discoveries of the Resolution Sloop Captain J. Cook in 1774." Contemporary calf, spine richly gilt, gilt morocco label. Front hinge weakening, light shelf wear. Bookplate on front free endpaper. Small worm holes in lower margin of second half of leaves, not affecting text. Very good. The earliest published complete account of Cook's second voyage, issued at least eighteen months prior to the official version. The second voyage included the first crossing of the Antarctic circle, making Marra's narrative the earliest firsthand account of the Antarctic, and the engraved plates are the first depictions of that region. Due to the strict regulations against private publications, the work was published anonymously, but the identity of the author did not remain a mystery for long. "Correspondence between Cook and the Admiralty shows that the author was John Marra, one of the gunners' mates in the Resolution. He was an Irishman whom Cook had picked up at Batavia during the first voyage. He made an abortive attempt to desert at Tahiti on 14 May 1774, an escapade of which Cook took so lenient a view that he says - 'I know not if he might have obtained my consent, if he had applied for it in proper time.' This did not, however, as Marra states at p. 241, prevent his being put in irons." - Holmes. This copy contains the extremely rare extra folding map, "Part of the Tropical Discoveries of the Resolution Sloop Captain J. Cook in 1774," which is noted by Beddie and Rosove but is not called for in most of the references. This map has, however, been present in three of the twenty-five copies of the first edition sold at auction in the last thirty or so years. The chart appears opposite the first page of text and shows New Caledonia and the Great Cyclades islands to the north and Norfolk island to the south. It is a most interesting production and is to be found in two states: first, as here with the engraver's name and with the position of Norfolk Island incorrectly placed 4° too far south; and second, with the engraver's name erased (but just visible), with the Norfolk Island's latitude corrected. The chart follows two of the Gilbert manuscript charts in spelling Ballabeah Isle with a final "h," unlike all the other manuscript charts. We have a definite date for the corrected issue of this chart, as it accompanied the article, "Late Voyages of the Resolution and Adventure," published in the GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE, Vol. XLVI, 1776 (edited by David Henry), opposite page 120 in the March issue. Therefore, it seems probable that the uncorrected chart found its way into copies of Marra issued during the last two or three months of 1775. "A rare work.contain[ing] details of many events not recorded in the official account, and a preface recording the causes which led Banks and his staff to withdraw from the expedition at the last moment. Accordingly it is a vital second voyage item." - Davidson. BAGNALL 630. ROSOVE 214.A1.b. KROEPELIEN 809. BEAGLEHOLE II, pp.cliii-clv. BEDDIE 1270. SPENCE 758. DAVIDSON, p.60. HOLMES 16. O'REILLY & REITMAN 379. KAEPPLER 29. HOCKEN, p.14. HILL 1087. CONRAD, p.13. STREETER SALE 2408. SABIN 16247.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM38463

  • Seller image for NARRATIVE OF THE UNITED STATES EXPLORING EXPEDITION. DURING THE YEARS 1838, 1839, 1840, 1841, 1842 for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

    Wilkes, Charles

    Published by Printed by C. Sherman, Philadelphia, 1845

    Seller: William Reese Company - Americana, New Haven, CT, U.S.A.
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    Seller Rating: 5-star rating

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    Philadelphia: Lea & Blanchard, 1845 (last two volumes). Five text volumes, with the five folding maps (two colored) called for in the atlas volume bound into the fourth text volume. Engraved portraits, plates, and maps, with original tissue guards intact. Thick quarto. Contemporary green morocco stamped in gilt, expertly rebacked with original backstrips preserved (except second volume, which is rebacked in matching style), spines richly gilt, gilt inner dentelles, a.e.g. Slight offsetting on the large folding maps, several neatly repaired along folds. Very good set. One of the great rarities of Pacific voyages, here in a mixed set of the true first edition and the first quarto edition of the narrative of the first great scientific expedition sponsored by the government of the United States. The first three volumes of the present set consist of the special Sherman edition of 100 copies, which is the true first edition and was issued for private distribution. The final two volumes are of the Lea and Blanchard printing, which was limited to 150 copies and was preceded only by the Sherman edition. The Lea and Blanchard edition is on the same format as the Sherman edition, and differs only in the preliminary material. The United States Exploring Expedition circumnavigated the globe under the command of Charles Wilkes between the summer of 1838 and the summer of 1842 (for a detailed account of the voyage, see the sources cited below). In July 1842, almost immediately upon his return, Wilkes began work on the narrative, drawing on all of the data and logs assembled by the members of the expedition. This took two years, but by August 1844 the first volume was in the press, and the whole set was ready for binding by the end of the year. The first "Sherman edition," in large quarto format, consisted of only 100 copies for the use of the government, and is easily distinguished by the Sherman imprint of 1844. The "Lea and Blanchard" quarto edition soon followed, and was probably off the presses before the end of 1844 (even though the volumes carry an imprint dated 1845). In fact, the verso of the titlepage of the two Lea and Blanchard volumes notes that the text was in fact printed by Sherman. Both the Sherman and the Lea and Blanchard editions present the text in five volumes, accompanied by an atlas volume of five maps. Those maps are here bound into the front of the fourth text volume. Of the 100 copies printed of the Sherman edition, twenty-five were later destroyed in the Lea and Blanchard fire, sixty-three copies were distributed to foreign governments and federal or state libraries in the United States, and only three were distributed to private individuals. Haskell, in preparing his bibliography of the publications of the expedition, was able to locate over thirty sets in libraries in the United States, but the Sherman edition virtually never appears on the market. The only sets we know of on the market since the 1980s are one from the Carlsmith collection, acquired from Howell, sold in 1985, and now in an Australian library, and two other sets sold by our firm. Of the 150 copies printed of the Lea and Blanchard edition, twenty-five were reserved for private distribution by Wilkes, and the remaining copies were offered for sale to individuals at sixty dollars per set. Haskell was able to locate only seven sets in libraries in the United States. A prime opportunity to obtain a set consisting of the two rarest printings of the most important American naval expedition of the 19th century. HASKELL, UNITED STATES EXPLORING EXPEDITION 1, 2A, 17A. HOWES W414, "c." David B. Tyler, THE WILKES EXPEDITION (Philadelphia, 1968). Herman J. Viola, ed., MAGNIFICENT VOYAGERS, THE U.S. EXPLORING EXPEDITION, 1838-1842 (Washington, 1985). HILL 1866. SABIN 103994. TWENEY, WASHINGTON 83. FORBES 1517. REESE, BEST OF THE WEST 85.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM33634

  • Seller image for AN ACCOUNT OF THE VOYAGES UNDERTAKEN BY THE ORDER OF HIS PRESENT MAJESTY.PERFORMED BY COMMODORE BYRON, CAPTAIN WALLIS, CAPTAIN CARTERET AND CAPTAIN COOK. for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

    US$ 33,500.00

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    [with:] Cook, James: A VOYAGE TOWARDS THE SOUTH POLE, AND ROUND THE WORLD.IN THE YEARS 1772, 1773, 1774, AND 1775. London. 1784. [with:] Cook, James: A VOYAGE TO THE PACIFIC OCEAN. London. 1784-85. [with:] Kippis, Andrew: THE LIFE OF CAPTAIN JAMES COOK. London. 1788. Ten volumes all together, including atlas volume. Text volumes: Large quarto. Contemporary calf, expertly rebacked. Atlas: Large folio. Modern three-quarter calf and contemporary boards, expertly rebacked in a complementary manner. Boards slightly worn, particularly at edges. Upper right corner of upper board of second volume of third voyage chipped. Light foxing and dampstaining in some volumes, particularly in margins. Some paper restoration on some plates in the atlas, particularly in corners. Armorial bookplates. Overall very good. A complete set of Cook's three voyages, being the second (and best) edition of the first voyage, the first edition of the second voyage, and a mixed set of the third voyage (volumes one and two are from the second edition, volume three from the first edition), with the plates of the third voyage bound in an atlas (lacks the rare "Death of Cook" plate, as usual), and with Kippis' biography of Cook. The first voyage describes Cook's explorations of New Zealand, Australia, Tahiti, and other islands. The second voyage describes his southern voyages in search of a southern continent. The third is his north Pacific explorations of Alaska, the Northwest Coast, and Hawaii, where the great navigator met his death. Of equal importance as a text of exploration, a cartographic source for the numerous maps and charts included in the work, and a visual source of the engravings of fauna, flora, and inhabitants of the Pacific. In all, the entire set contains more than 200 maps and plates. HILL 782, 783. HOWES C729a (3rd voyage). HOLMES 5, 24, 47. BEDDIE 650, 1216, 1552. LADA-MOCARSKI 37 (3rd voyage). MITCHELL LIBRARY, COOK BIBLIOGRAPHY, passim. FORBES 62 (3rd voyage). ROSOVE ANTARCTIC 77 (2nd voyage).

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM18891

  • Seller image for THE NATIVITY AND OTHER MUSIC [manuscript title] for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

    Dana, James D.; James C. Palmer; et al]

    Published by [Various places, including Antarctica, the Northwest Coast, and shipboard, 1842

    Seller: William Reese Company - Americana, New Haven, CT, U.S.A.
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    Seller Rating: 5-star rating

    US$ 60,000.00

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    54pp. including four original color sketches. Oblong quarto. Contemporary black morocco, ornate gilt cover, stamped with the initials of James D. Dana and James C. Palmer, neatly rebacked with most of the original spine preserved. Corners slightly worn. Internally bright and clean. Later presentation inscription on front free endpaper. Overall in fine condition. A superlative album of music, lyrics, and artwork composed by officers of the United States Exploring Expedition (1838-42), originally composed during their landmark voyage. Included are several of the earliest views of Antarctica, as well as a superb watercolor of Oregon. The work is the collaboration of expedition scientist James D. Dana and expedition Acting Surgeon James C. Palmer, shipmates aboard the U.S.S. Peacock and evidently close friends. Dana, a young officer of twenty-five, was the only scientist of the expedition with previous naval experience. His work was shaped by his mentor, Prof. Benjamin Silliman of Yale, who became his father-in-law upon his return. Palmer served as a well-respected medical officer. Together the two, with artistic contributions from colleagues, recorded the events of the expedition in this album in remarkable fashion. The musical scores were Dana's forte, while the lyrics fell to Palmer. The album consists of eight selections of music, four of which are adorned by original artwork, delineated as follows: 1) "The Nativity, A Dramatic Canticle." The first and longest piece in the album, likely written and performed in the interest of buoying morale. Stage directions and music were later printed in broadside format, located in only one copy, at the John Hay Library of Brown University. 2) "Veni Parvule." Dedicated to Palmer's wife, Juliet, occasioned by the death of his son during the expedition. An unattributed color portrait of the little boy precedes the music. 3) "The Stars May Aye Their Vigils Keep. Pacific Ocean - 1841." A melancholy tune, lamenting a father's absence upon the death of his newborn child, no doubt related to the previous title. 4) "A Breeze from the Unpopular Opera of The Iceberg!!" Below the ornate manuscript title of this piece appears a detailed watercolor of the Peacock locked in Antarctic ice, labeled in large block letters: "The Icebergs!" A small party of men in the foreground are engaged in what is likely repair of the damaged vessel. The sketch is captioned: "Accurately drawn by Dr. Guillou [a quarrelsome medical officer and Palmer's subordinate], January 24, 1840. Computed area, 32 miles." At the time the Wilkes expedition had travelled closer towards the pole than any previous American venture, making this image among the earliest evidence of the United States' "farthest south." This song was later published in Palmer's ANTARCTIC MARINER'S SONG. (New York: D. Van Nostrand, 1868), pp.75-76. Historian David B. Tyler cites Passed Midshipman Henry Eld's journal description of the Peacock at this moment as a "happy" ship, continuing that the crew could be heard "stamping about the decks the whole day in the most merry mood - dancing and singing most of the time." This merriment was likely the product of Dana and Palmer's song-writing efforts, though the mood changed dramatically in a moment. Tyler writes: "On the morning of the twenty-fourth this merry mood suddenly changed into one verging on panic. It was a clear day with light winds and smooth water as the ship worked her way into a bay searching, as always, for a means of reaching land. Space for maneuvering was limited.the first crash threw those having breakfast out of their seats, making them think the whole bow must be stove in, but actually the most serious damage was at the stern where the starboard wheelrope was carried and the neck of the rudder wrenched so that it became inoperable." The next twenty-four hours saw the condition of the Peacock deteriorate substantially, and it was only through the competent labors of the ship's carpenters that catastrophic disaster was avoided. The resulting "Breeze," also titled "The Old Peacock," was written in Honolulu, to entice shipmates to re-enlist by reminding them in song of the hardships that had brought the crew so close together. A selection referring to the loss of the ship's rudder reads: "Our pluck did not fail, till we lost our tail / And then 't was high time to belay; / But we stuck here clean through, and it came out anew, / And if any man says this yarn is not true, / Let him go there himself, some day." 5) "One Gentle Word.Oregon - 1841." A romantic love song addressed to an unnamed lover, likely Palmer's wife. 6) "My Tent Beside the Oregon." A light ditty, with an introduction based on the Chinook language. Above the title of this piece is a detailed watercolor of the expedition's camp beside the Columbia River drawn by Joseph Drayton, the primary artist of the expedition. The sketch is among the first views of Army exploration in the Pacific Northwest. It shows two tents surrounded by evergreens, with an American flag mounted on a makeshift pole to the right. An officer is shown seated upon a captain's chair outside the nearest tent. A pencil note, evidently added later, reads: "Sketched with camera lucida. The flag is the one referred to by Dr. Kane, vol. I, p.298." In that narrative, Elisha Kane's ARCTIC EXPLORATIONS. (Philadelphia: Childs & Peterson, 1856), the author writes that the flag was later flown high into the Arctic near Cape Constitution. The camp, affectionately dubbed "Peacockville," was built along the Columbia following the wreck of the Peacock at the river's mouth. The ship had struck the bar upon approaching what was thought to be the channel to the Columbia River. Over the next forty-eight hours the ship was wrecked entirely as a rising sea repeatedly smashed the vessel against the shore. Through the heroics of Capt. William Hudson no lives were lost, and enough supplies were salvaged to allow for the construction of the camp a sh.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM48964