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    Hardcover. Condition: Good. First Greenwood Reprinting [stated]. viii, 244, [4] pages. Footnotes. Index. Ex-U.S. Atomic Energy Commission library. Usual library markings. James Robinson Shepley (August 16, 1917 - November 2, 1988) was an American journalist and businessman who was president of Time Inc. from 1969 to 1980 and was CEO of The Washington Star from 1978 until the paper was shut down in 1981. Shepley was given credit for having expanded Time Inc. into different areas of publishing and into television and video. In 1942 he began working for Time magazine's Washington bureau. He then became a war correspondent for Time and Life magazine. In 1948 he became chief of the Washington bureau, a position he continued to hold into the 1950s. The prominence of his position, his wartime reporting combined to give Shepley unusual access to the U.S. defense and diplomatic establishments. By 1953, American physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer had taken stances related to the development of the hydrogen bomb and the value and morality of strategic bombardment that led to a concerted effort against Oppenheimer undertaken by the United States Air Force and other elements of the defense and atomic energy establishments. The Shepley and Blair work, The Hydrogen Bomb: The Men, The Menace, The Mechanism (1954), provoked considerable controversy at the time with its charges that the U.S. development of the hydrogen bomb had been intentionally delayed by some scientists led by Oppenheimer. The book was positively reviewed across a large number of newspapers and magazines at the time of publication. The behind-the-scenes story of the controversies and disagreements surrounding the development and construction of the hydrogen bomb in the United States. Clay Drewry Blair Jr. (May 1, 1925 - December 16, 1998) was an American journalist and author, best known for his books on military history. Blair wrote some two dozen history books and hundreds of magazine articles. Blair wrote for Time and Life magazines. At Time-Life during the 1950s he covered the Pentagon ,focusing on issues of national security and nuclear weapons policy. Over the years, Blair worked for the Curtis Publishing Company as both a correspondent and an editor. In particular he became editor-in-chief of The Saturday Evening Post during the early 1960s. During his stint there, he made an emphasis of publishing exclusive reports but also faced a series of libel suits. Beginning in 1962, Blair was also in editorial charge of all of Curtis Publishing's other magazines in addition to the Post, and held the titles of executive vice president and directory. Blair earned trust as a collaborator when he assisted General Omar Bradley in the writing of his autobiography, A General's Life (1983), published after the general's death. Blair's history of the Korean War The Forgotten War: America in Korea, 1950-1953 (1987) is considered one of the definitive historical works on the war. Blair also wrote extensively on the submarine war of World War II, notably in the bestselling Silent Victory: The U.S. Submarine War Against Japan (1975), considered the definitive work on the Pacific submarine war.

    Seller Inventory # 84135

  • Pederson, Jeffrey L. (Editor)

    Published by Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, 1978

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    Wraps. Condition: Very good. Bill Jack Rodgers (Photography) and LeRoy N. Sanch (illustrator). 24 pages, plus covers. Illustrations. Cover has some wear and soiling. Mailing label on back cover. The Atom was published between 1964 and 1980. This issue is focused on The Amazing Pion". It has articles entitled Japanese visitor are part of a new cooperative program; A Nobel Prize for predicting the pion's existence 40 years ago;' Pion treatment in its infancy, with guarded optimism for future, and Meet PIGMI: small brother to the meson facility. PIGMI stands for Pion Generator for Medical Irradiations. In the section on 10 years ago there was mention of a special citation from the American Ceramic Society to Maria Martinez, "The Potter of San Ildefonso". This was only the third time in the group's 69 year history that such an award had been made. Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos or LANL for short) is a United States Department of Energy national laboratory initially organized during World War II for the design of nuclear weapons as part of the Manhattan Project. It is located a short distance northwest of Santa Fe, New Mexico in the southwestern United States. Los Alamos was selected as the top secret location for bomb design in late 1942, and officially commissioned the next year. At the time it was known as Project Y, one of a series of laboratories located across the United States given letter names to maintain their secrecy. Los Alamos was the center for design and overall coordination, while the other labs, today known as Oak Ridge and Hanford, concentrated on the production of uranium and plutonium bomb fuels. Los Alamos was the heart of the project, collecting together some of the world's most famous scientists, among them numerous Nobel Prize winners. The site was known variously as Project Y, Los Alamos Laboratory, and Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory through this period. Presumed First Edition, First printing thus this issue.

    Seller Inventory # 84131

  • Armistead, John (Editor)

    Published by Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, 1978

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    Wraps. Condition: Good. Bill Jack Rodgers (Photography) and Johnnie Martin (illustrator). 24 pages, plus covers. Illustrations. Cover has some wear and soiling. Mailing label on back cover. The Atom was published between 1964 and 1980. This issue has articles entitled Thermal Infrared Scanning; DOE Officials Here For Review; Science Youth Days; UC Regents Visit; Geothermal Conference; and Accelerator People Gather. This issue also includes the following regular features: Short Subjects, Among Our Guests and 10 Years Ago. From the 10 years ago section, in 1968 LASL J-11 radiochemists discovered two new isotopes, AM 247 and AM 246. The rear cover has a picture of Dixy Lee Ray with her hand in a glovebox. Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos or LANL for short) is a United States Department of Energy national laboratory initially organized during World War II for the design of nuclear weapons as part of the Manhattan Project. It is located a short distance northwest of Santa Fe, New Mexico in the southwestern United States. Los Alamos was selected as the top secret location for bomb design in late 1942, and officially commissioned the next year. At the time it was known as Project Y, one of a series of laboratories located across the United States given letter names to maintain their secrecy. Los Alamos was the center for design and overall coordination, while the other labs, today known as Oak Ridge and Hanford, concentrated on the production of uranium and plutonium bomb fuels. Los Alamos was the heart of the project, collecting together some of the world's most famous scientists, among them numerous Nobel Prize winners. The site was known variously as Project Y, Los Alamos Laboratory, and Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory through this period. Presumed First Edition, First printing thus this issue.

    Seller Inventory # 84127

  • Armistead, John (Editor)

    Published by Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, 1978

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    Wraps. Condition: Good. Bill Jack Rodgers (Photography) and Johnnie Martin (illustrator). 24 pages, plus covers. Illustrations. Map. Cover has some wear and soiling. Mailing label on back cover. The Atom was published between 1964 and 1980. This issue has articles entitled How's the Weather?; Solar Design Workshop; A Place in History; Plateau Structures Studied; and Cosmos: Picking Up the Pieces. This issue also includes the following regular features: Short Subjects, Among Our Guests, Photo Short, and 10 Years Ago. From the 10 years ago section, in 1968 a new technical division at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory had been formed--called the Computer Science and Services Division. The purpose in establishing C-Division was to increase the long term efficiency and capability of LASL's computing facilities in support of all Laboratory programs. Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos or LANL for short) is a United States Department of Energy national laboratory initially organized during World War II for the design of nuclear weapons as part of the Manhattan Project. It is located a short distance northwest of Santa Fe, New Mexico in the southwestern United States. Los Alamos was selected as the top secret location for bomb design in late 1942, and officially commissioned the next year. At the time it was known as Project Y, one of a series of laboratories located across the United States given letter names to maintain their secrecy. Los Alamos was the center for design and overall coordination, while the other labs, today known as Oak Ridge and Hanford, concentrated on the production of uranium and plutonium bomb fuels. Los Alamos was the heart of the project, collecting together some of the world's most famous scientists, among them numerous Nobel Prize winners. The site was known variously as Project Y, Los Alamos Laboratory, and Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory through this period. Presumed First Edition, First printing thus this issue.

    Seller Inventory # 84126

  • Storms, Edmund K.

    Published by Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory of the University of California, Los Alamos, NM, 1964

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    Wraps. Condition: Good. x, 245, [1] pages. Printed on both sides. Figures. Tables. Formulae. Bibliography. Stapled on left side. Number on front cover. Name and organizational code in ink on front cover. Title on spine. This report is a revision of LAMS-2674, Parts I and II, to which a discussion of the nitrides and carbides of U, Th, and Pu has been added. State of the art as of mid-1960s. In general the literature covered extends from about 1930, depending on the system and the quality of the work, to March 1964. Although an effort has been made to present as complete a description of each system as possible, only that work which, in the author's opinion, would led to a clearer understanding has been discussed in any detail. Most early work and some recent measurements have been largely ignored except to show the effect of oxygen content or to give an approximate measured value when no other exists. Many of the references cited, as well as several books, contain complete bibliographies of the early literature and may be consulted when necessary. The carbides and nitrides discussed in this report suffer from two properties that have led to a considerable accumulation of questionable data. First, they are commonly single phase over a wide range of composition, and, second, they will form a solid solution with each other and with their respective oxide. Both of these factors will affect the properties of these materials, sometimes in a very striking manner. Without the use of care in preparing the compounds and the application of proper analytical techniques, an investigation may offer little meaningful information. Edmund K. Storms was a distinguished nuclear chemist who served the Los Alamos National Laboratory for more than 30 years. A refractory material or refractory is a material that is resistant to decomposition by heat, pressure, or chemical attack, and retains strength and form at high temperatures. Refractories are polycrystalline, polyphase, inorganic, non-metallic, porous, and heterogeneous. They are typically composed of oxides or carbides, nitrides etc. of the following materials: silicon, aluminum, magnesium, calcium, boron, chromium and zirconium. ASTM C71 defines refractories as ".non-metallic materials having those chemical and physic300.00al properties that make them applicable for structures, or as components of systems, that are exposed to environments above 1,000 °F (811 K; 538 °C)." Refractory materials are used in furnaces, kilns, incinerators, and reactors. Refractories are also used to make crucibles and moulds for casting glass and metals and for surfacing flame deflector systems for rocket launch structures. Today, the iron- and steel-industry and metal casting sectors use approximately 70% of all refractories produced. First Edition, First Printing thus, This Report supersedes LANL-2674, Parts I and II., Stated as 31st Edition.

    Seller Inventory # 84116

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    Trade paperback. Condition: Good. Presumed First Edition, First printing. Various paginations (640 pages per bibliographic reference). Footnotes. Figures. Tables. References. Ex-Los Alamos National Laboratory with usual library markings. Back cover tear. This collection of W. F. Libby's papers contains all those on Radiocarbon and Tritium Dating and Tracing. The papers are introduced briefly by either a collaborator or the editors. After the war, Libby accepted an offer from the University of Chicago of a professorship in the Chemistry Department at the new Institute for Nuclear Studies. He returned to his studies of radioactivity. In 1939, Serge Korff had discovered that cosmic rays generated neutrons in the upper atmosphere. These interact with nitrogen-14 in the air to produce carbon-14: 1n + 14N 14C + 1p. The half-life of carbon-14 is 5,730±40 years. Libby realized that when plants and animals die they cease to ingest fresh carbon-14, thereby giving any organic compound a built-in nuclear clock. He published his theory in 1946 and expanded on it in his monograph Radiocarbon Dating in 1955. He also developed sensitive radiation detectors that could use the technique. Tests against sequoia with known dates from their tree rings showed radiocarbon dating to be reliable and accurate. The technique revolutionized archaeology, paleontology and other disciplines that dealt with ancient artifacts. In 1960, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry "for his method to use carbon-14 for age determination in archaeology, geology, geophysics, and other branches of science". He also discovered that tritium similarly could be used for dating water, and therefore wine. Willard Frank Libby (December 17, 1908 - September 8, 1980) was an American physical chemist noted for his role in the 1949 development of radiocarbon dating, a process which revolutionized archaeology and paleontology. For his contributions to the team that developed this process, Libby was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1960. A 1931 chemistry graduate of the University of California, Berkeley, from which he received his doctorate in 1933, he studied radioactive elements and developed sensitive Geiger counters to measure weak natural and artificial radioactivity. During World War II he worked in the Manhattan Project's Substitute Alloy Materials (SAM) Laboratories at Columbia University, developing the gaseous diffusion process for uranium enrichment. After the war, Libby accepted professorship at the University of Chicago's Institute for Nuclear Studies, where he developed the technique for dating organic compounds using carbon-14. He also discovered that tritium similarly could be used for dating water, and therefore wine. In 1950, he became a member of the General Advisory Committee (GAC) of the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). He was appointed a commissioner in 1954, becoming its sole scientist. He sided with Edward Teller on pursuing a crash program to develop the hydrogen bomb, participated in the Atoms for Peace program, and defended the administration's atmospheric nuclear testing. Libby resigned from the AEC in 1959 to become Professor of Chemistry at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), a position he held until his retirement in 1976. In 1962, he became the Director of the University of California statewide Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP).

    Seller Inventory # 84110

  • Comb binding. Condition: Fair. 137 pages (per DD Form 1473, Jun 86). Figures, Tables. This may be a copy from a copy. Some writing on the front cover. Authors Perkins and Chiang were with Lockheed. Authors Meier and Miller were with the University of Pittsburgh. This work was prepared for the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. Roger Perkins graduated with his Bachelor's Degree in Metallurgical Engineering from Purdue University, and enjoyed a long career with Lockheed-Martin Aerospace Company after his time with the United States Navy. Gerald Meier served 49 years at Pitt, plus one year as an emeritus professor. He published two successful books, Introduction to the High-Temperature Oxidation of Metals in 2006 and Thermodynamics of Surfaces and Interfaces: Concepts in Inorganic Materials in 2014. From the Abstract: Factors affecting the formation of protective alumina scaled on Nb-base alloys by selective oxidation have been investigated. Alumina cannot be formed in air at latm. on binary Nb-A1 alloys at any NAl. Theoretical knowledge of selective oxidation has been applied to Nb-A1 alloys to alter behavior. The effects of Al-content, temperature, atmosphere, third element additions, and microstructure on the transition from internal to external oxidation of aluminum has been evaluated and conditions under which protective alumina scales can form on Nb-A1 alloys have been defined. Third element additions are required to form protective alumina. The most effective additions are those which can reduce the solubility and diffusivity of oxygen, enhance diffusion of A1, and limit transient oxidation. Additions of Ti, Cr, V and Si were identified as most promising for providing oxidation resistance in Nb-A1 alloys. The feasibility of forming compact, adherent alumina scales on Nb alloys at a minimum NA10.32 in air at 1100-1600 C has been demonstrated. Alumina scale could not be formed below 1100 C. Preoxidation above 1100 C can be used to perform alumina scales that will protect at lower temperatures but is effective only if the alloy is not cooled to room temperature prior to exposure at lower temperatures. Rapid solidification processing does not appear to offer any significant benefit. Presumed First Edition, First printing thus. Xerox style production with degraded photographic images.

    Seller Inventory # 84106

  • Comb binding. Condition: Very good. Presumed First Edition, First printing. i, 108 pages (printed single-sided only). Figures. Tables. This work had three main thrust areas: Solidification Studies and Single Crystal Growth; Mechanical Behavior of NiAl Single Crystals, and Other Characterization Studies. During the second year of this program, the efforts shifted from specimen preparation and characterization to property measurements and interpretation. Specifically, the authors continued to refine the processing strategies with the goal of producing high quality materials with controlled compositions and impurity levels and to then correlate the properties measured with the impurity and solute levels present. Among the accomplishment was the demonstrated ability to produce single crystals of NiAl with minimal contamination. They also had observations that suggested that NiAl superheats above its melting temperature and felt this merited further consideration. A major focus of this work was the area of mechanical property measurements. Significantly, the authors have shown that both static and dynamic strain aging (SSA and DSA, respectively) occur in NiAl, as originally hypothesized in their initial proposal. This was part of the University Research Initiative of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. Dr. Michael Kaufman is currently the Director of Materials and Energy Initiatives at the Colorado School of Mines. Prior to taking this position, he served in various capacities at Mines starting in 2007. He became the Dean of Energy and Materials Programs and Vice Provost for Graduate and Research Initiatives where he served from 2018-2021. In 2021, he joined the Office of Research and Technology Transfer in his current role. Prior to his time at Mines, Dr. Kaufman served on the faculty at the University of North Texas, the University of Florida, and the University of Washington and as a staff member at the National Institute of Science and Technology. His research focus has been in using advanced characterization techniques to study materials with a focus on alloys for structural applications. Reza Abbaschian is an Iranian/American engineer, currently the William R. Johnson, Jr. Family Professor, Distinguished Professor of Mechanical Engineering and the former Dean of the Bourns College of Engineering and, also formerly the Vladimir Grodsky Professor of Materials Science at University of Florida. The Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) provides basic research funding to further progress towards Air Force mission needs. AFOSR has a staff of 200 scientists, engineers and administrators headquartered in Arlington, Va., and has foreign technology offices in Santiago, London and Tokyo. The focus of AFOSR is on research areas that offer significant and comprehensive benefits to national warfighting and peacekeeping capabilities, organized by five scientific departments: Dynamical Systems and Control Division; Quantum and Non-Equilibrium Processes Division; Information, Decision and Complex Networks Division; Complex Materials and Devices Division; and Energy, Power and Propulsion Division. AFOSR has formed a strong, productive alliance with other government agencies, industry and the academic community. About 70 percent of the research is conducted in academia and industry and the remaining 30 percent is conducted within AFRL.

    Seller Inventory # 84105

  • DePoorter, Gerald L.

    Published by Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory of the University of California, Los Alamos, NM, 1966

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    Wraps. Condition: Good. Presumed First Edition, First printing. 23, [1] pages plus covers. Figures. Formulae. Tables. Name in ink on front cover. Number stamped on front cover. This report was written January 20, 1966 and distributed April 26, 1966. The Abstract states: Known thermodynamic properties are used to determine the validity of theoretical models for calculating thermodynamic properties of interstitial solid solutions and defect compounds. The model for interstitial solid solutions is shown to be unacceptable for several reasons, and the model for defect compounds does not satisfy the assumptions on which it is based. All LA.MS reports are informal documents, usually prepared for a special purpose and primarily prepared for use with the Laboratory rather than for general distribution. This report has not been edited, reviewed or verified for accuracy. All LA.MS reports express the views of the authors as of the time they were written and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory or the final opinion of the authors on the subject. Dr. DePoorter apparently began working at Los Alamos in 1971 and spent a significant amount of his career there. The terms "interstitial compound" and "interstitial phase" are commonly applied to the compounds of the transition metals with the light nonmetals hydrogen, boron, carbon, nitrogen, and, sometimes, oxygen, silicon, phosphorus, and sulfur. The alternate term "hard metals" has been used for the compounds with boron, carbon, nitrogen, and silicon. The latter description refers to the properties of metallic luster and conductivity, coupled with high hardness, while the "interstitial" descriptions are derived from a consideration of the crystal structures of these compounds. Both types of definition refer to compounds that may be considered as intermediate between intermetallic compounds, or alloys, and inorganic (nonmetallic) compounds, with some of the properties of each class. Interstitial solid solutions are solid state solutions that form when solute atoms enter into the holes between solvent atoms of the lattice. There, the solute atoms are small enough to enter into these holes. We call these holes, interstitial sites. This process weakens the bonds between solvent atoms.

    Seller Inventory # 84109

  • Pederson, Jeffrey L. (Editor)

    Published by Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, 1978

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    Wraps. Condition: Very good. Bill Jack Rodgers (Photography) and LeRoy N. Sanch (illustrator). 24 pages, plus covers. Illustrations. Cover has some wear and soiling. Mailing label on back cover. The Atom was published between 1964 and 1980. This issue has articles entitled Tracking the elk, magnificent neighbors; Twelfth annual meeting, LAMPF Users Group; Agnew announces resignation; A visit to the National Atomic Museum; and Reach for Antares. There is also a section on Ten years ago, which mentioned that Norris Bradbury had been named to the University of New Mexico Board of Regents. Also mentioned was the Sigvard Eklund, Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency visited the Laboratory. Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos or LANL for short) is a United States Department of Energy national laboratory initially organized during World War II for the design of nuclear weapons as part of the Manhattan Project. It is located a short distance northwest of Santa Fe, New Mexico in the southwestern United States. Los Alamos was selected as the top secret location for bomb design in late 1942, and officially commissioned the next year. At the time it was known as Project Y, one of a series of laboratories located across the United States given letter names to maintain their secrecy. Los Alamos was the center for design and overall coordination, while the other labs, today known as Oak Ridge and Hanford, concentrated on the production of uranium and plutonium bomb fuels. Los Alamos was the heart of the project, collecting together some of the world's most famous scientists, among them numerous Nobel Prize winners. The site was known variously as Project Y, Los Alamos Laboratory, and Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory through this period. Presumed First Edition, First printing thus this issue.

    Seller Inventory # 84133

  • Storms, Edmund K.

    Published by Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, 1962

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    Cloth tape spine binding. Condition: Good. This report was written on February 1, 1962 and distributed on March 15, 1962. It is copy number 53 (per stamp on front cover). Edmund K. Storms obtained a Ph.D. in radiochemistry from Washington University (St. Louis) and retired from the Los Alamos National Laboratory after thirty-four years of service. His work there involved research in the field of high temperature chemistry as applied to materials used in nuclear power and propulsion reactors. Over seventy publications and monographs resulted as well as several books and two patents. All LAMS reports are informal documents, usually prepared for a special purpose and primarily prepared for use within the Laboratory rather than for general distribution. All LAMS reports express the views of the authors as of the time they were written and to not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory or the final opinion of the authors on the subject. Label on front of the report indicated that this was Superseded by LA-2942. Name and organizational code in ink on front cover. The Abstract states: The literature concerning the Group 4a, -5a, and -6a carbides has been reviewed critically. The following properties have been discussed: preparation, phase relationship, lattice parameter and structure, appearance. chemical stability, hardness, resistivity, superconductivity, thermodynamic properties, and vaporization. When possible, each property has been considered in light of the wide homogeneity exhibited by these carbides. Particular attention has been paid to methods by which the carbides can be made oxygen and nitrogen free. This copy at one time belonged to Darryl Butt, NMT-1. This is possibly the Dr. Darryl P. Butt who became a professor and chair of Materials Science and Engineering at Boise State University, and an associate director of the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls. Dr. Butt held several positions at Los Alamos National Laboratory between 1991 and 1999. As a postdoctoral fellow he studied very high temperature hydrogen-solid reactions and thermodynamics of transition metal and actinide carbides. This work included developing planar laser induced fluorescence methods for characterizing and directly imaging plasmas produced during laser ablation processes, modeling gas-solid reactions, and modeling of binary, ternary and quaternary phase diagrams. In 1994 he established the Materials Corrosion and Environmental Effects Laboratory within the Materials Science and Technology Division, where as a team leader, he lead efforts in a variety of areas including aqueous and high-temperature oxidation of ceramics, alloys and protective coatings, radiation effects on materials corrosion, gallium vaporization, sequestration of carbon dioxide and development of high-temperature materials and seals, and carbon dioxide sequestration. In 1998, Butt became the project leader for Weapons Dismantlement and Fissile Materials Transparency where he managed and oversaw technical efforts and policy development related to a possible START III treaty and Russian-U.S. lab-to-lab technical interactions in nuclear nonproliferation. 17th edition [stated]. Presumed first printing thus.

    Seller Inventory # 84103

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    Trade paperback. Condition: Good. xii, 323, [1] pages. Footnotes. Boxes. Figures. Tables. For Further Reading. Glossary. Index. Stamps, ink marking, and sticker residue on half-title page. Some highlighting noted. Cover has some wear and soiling. Richard Smoke (October 21, 1944, Huntingdon, Pennsylvania - May 1995, Sarasota, California) was an American historian and political scientist. He graduated from Harvard University magna cum laude in 1965, and from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology with a Ph.D. in political science in 1972. His doctoral thesis was entitled Toward the control of escalation: a historical analysis and his advisor was William W. Kaufmann. A professor of political science, he became the Research Director of the Watson Institute's Center For Foreign Policy Development at Brown University in 1985. He was the co-founder of the Center for Peace and Common Security. An internship at Brown University's Watson Institute for International Studies has been named in his honor. One of the best general books on the postwar history of American security policy that we have now available. Written in clear prose, unencumbered by technical jargon . . . the book provides an analytic historical overview. This text examines the impact of nuclear weaponry on national security issues in the United States. Beginning with the development of the nuclear dilemma in the larger context of the politico-technological developments of recent centuries, this work finishes by covering events that took place from 1985 to 1991, including a detailed discussion of the bilateral reductions in tactical nuclear weapons by the USA and the former USSR, making the material relevant to the post Cold War era. Second Edition (stated). First printing (stated).

    Seller Inventory # 84098

  • Pederson, Jeffrey L. (Editor)

    Published by Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, 1978

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    Wraps. Condition: Very good. Bill Jack Rodgers (Photography) and LeRoy N. Sanch (illustrator). 20 pages, plus covers. Illustrations. Cover has some wear and soiling. Mailing label on front cover. The Atom was published between 1964 and 1980. This issue has articles entitled Dividing fact and the fanciful: rugs, artifacts, and nondestructive testing; Glittering facts: Einsteinian magic: The 1978 Oppenheimer Memorial Lecture; Hoisting a 30-ton Crane: Constructional at Meson Physics Facility; Tests link cancer to body's natural defense system; Super-storage for West Coast power lines: helping the Bonneville Power Administration. This issue also includes the regular features of short subjects and 10 years ago. In 1968 Lt.-Gen. Harold C. Donnelly (USAF retired) assumed the duties of manager of the AEC's Albuquerque Operations Office. He had been the Commander of Field Command, Defense Atomic Support Agency at Sandia Base and director of the Defense Atomic Support Agency in Washington. There is a typographic error in the listing of the articles inside the front cover. What is stated as a 3-ton crane should be, per the actual article, a 30-ton crane. Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos or LANL for short) is a United States Department of Energy national laboratory initially organized during World War II for the design of nuclear weapons as part of the Manhattan Project. It is located a short distance northwest of Santa Fe, New Mexico in the southwestern United States. Los Alamos was selected as the top secret location for bomb design in late 1942, and officially commissioned the next year. At the time it was known as Project Y, one of a series of laboratories located across the United States given letter names to maintain their secrecy. Los Alamos was the center for design and overall coordination, while the other labs, today known as Oak Ridge and Hanford, concentrated on the production of uranium and plutonium bomb fuels. Los Alamos was the heart of the project, collecting together some of the world's most famous scientists, among them numerous Nobel Prize winners. The site was known variously as Project Y, Los Alamos Laboratory, and Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory through this period. Presumed First Edition, First printing thus this issue.

    Seller Inventory # 84130

  • Storeplay, Inc

    Published by Storeplay, Inc, 1987

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    Boxed board game. Condition: Good. MELTDOWN is the nuclear energy conflict game designed to be played by 2-6 players or teams ages teen to adult. The game involves elements of both chance and strategy. The strategy level ranges from simple to complex depending on the level of sophistication of the players. The two elements are heightened and interrelated as events in the game impact players both by the chance roll of the dice, and by strategic design of the other players. Each player is assigned 6 zones on which there is a clean reactor printed. The object of the game is to be the first player to make all six zones "Nuclear Free" or :Nuclear Safe" Working against you is the fact that both the game board and your opponents will be trying to force you to experience nuclear incidents at the reactors in your zones. These incidents will progress from the Alarm Stage (a level 1 incident) to the Radiation Warning Stage (a level 2 incident) to the Reactor Fault State (a level 3 incident) and finally to the MELTDOWN stage. Naturally, each stage is progressively more difficult to correct; and moreover a MELTDOWN requires a serious cleanup operations. Appears complete. Box top torn at one corner and shows wear and soiling. Copyright is held by Spohis, Incorporated. The game consists of the following parts: 1 set of instructions, 1 game board, 1 deck of Nuclear credit cards, 1 deck of cleanup credit card, 1 deck of event cards, 1 pair of dice, 6 zone cards, 6 colored tokens, for moving around the board, 2 Impact value sheets/incident flow charts, 108 Incident indicator cards, 36 Level 1/Level 2, 36 Level 3/Waste Site, 36 Nuclear Free/Nuclear Safe, and 12 Meltdown Indicator Towers. Presumed First Edition, First issuance thus.

    Seller Inventory # 84100

  • Armistead, John (Editor)

    Published by Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, 1978

    Seller: Ground Zero Books, Ltd., Silver Spring, MD, U.S.A.
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    Wraps. Condition: Good. Bill Jack Rodgers (Photography) and Johnnie Martin (illustrator). 24 pages, plus covers. Illustrations. Map. Cover has some wear and soiling. Mailing label on front cover. The Atom was published between 1964 and 1980. This issue has articles entitled Solar Energy: Abundant But Not Free; The Atom Has a New Printer; LAMPF Building New Remote Manipulators, and Prehistoric Settlements On the Pajarito Plateau. This issue also includes the following regular features: Short Subjects, Among Our Guests, Photo Short, and 10 Years Ago. The front cover shows Carl Newton adjusting the "Skylid" roof in the central greenhouse of his White Rock home. Each metal panel has a black canister, facing the sky, and a light canister, facing inside. Freon flows through tubing from the black canister, when the sun's heat forces the liquid to the inside canister, where it condenses. The shift in weight causes the Skylids, which are mounted on ball-bearing pivots, to open. At night, the black canisters radiate much of their heat outward and cool down. the Freon medium shifts again and the Skylids close, preventing a great deal of heat loss. Adobe walls and window openings transfer the sun's stored heat to other living quarters throughout the evening. the photo is by Johnnie Martinez. The new printer was the Panorama Press of Albuquerque. From the 10 years ago section, in 1968 Regular gas at the Los Alamos service station was 27.9 cents a gallon. Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos or LANL for short) is a United States Department of Energy national laboratory initially organized during World War II for the design of nuclear weapons as part of the Manhattan Project. It is located a short distance northwest of Santa Fe, New Mexico in the southwestern United States. Los Alamos was selected as the top secret location for bomb design in late 1942, and officially commissioned the next year. At the time it was known as Project Y, one of a series of laboratories located across the United States given letter names to maintain their secrecy. Los Alamos was the center for design and overall coordination, while the other labs, today known as Oak Ridge and Hanford, concentrated on the production of uranium and plutonium bomb fuels. Los Alamos was the heart of the project, collecting together some of the world's most famous scientists, among them numerous Nobel Prize winners. The site was known variously as Project Y, Los Alamos Laboratory, and Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory through this period. Presumed First Edition, First printing thus this issue.

    Seller Inventory # 84124

  • Drell, Sidney D. (Editor) and Shultz, George P. (Editor)

    Published by Hoover Institution Press, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 2015

    ISBN 10: 0817918957ISBN 13: 9780817918958

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    Trade paperback. Condition: Very good. First Printing [Stated]. xxiii, [1], 164, [4] pages. Illustrated front cover. Notes. Conference Agenda. Index. Among the contributors are: Serge Schmemann, Bryan Hebir, Willing Swing, Raymond Jeanloz, Lucy Shapiro, Elizabeth Holmes, Christopher Stubbs, James Ellis, James Mattis, David Holloway, and James Goodby. Among the issues raised were: Environmental Effects, Nuclear War, Infectious Disease, Disruptive Technologies, Ethics, and Moral Reasoning. Sidney David Drell (September 13, 1926 - December 21, 2016) was an American theoretical physicist and arms control expert. He was professor emeritus at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) and senior fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution. Drell was a noted contributor in the fields of quantum electrodynamics and high-energy particle physics. The Drell-Yan process is partially named for him. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois in 1949. He co-authored the textbooks Relativistic Quantum Mechanics and Relativistic Quantum Fields with James Bjorken. Drell was active as a scientific advisor to the U.S. government, and was a founding member of the JASON Defense Advisory Group. He was an expert in nuclear arms control and cofounder of the Center for International Security and Arms Control, now the Center for International Security and Cooperation. George Pratt Shultz (December 13, 1920 - February 6, 2021) was an American economist, diplomat, and businessman. He is one of only two people to have held four different Cabinet-level posts. He played a major role in shaping the Reagan Administration's foreign policy. Andrei Sakharov holds an honored place in the pantheon of the world's greatest scientists, reformers, and champions of human rights. But his embrace of human rights did not come through a sudden conversion; he came to it in stages. Drawing from a 2014 Hoover Institution conference focused on Sakharov's life and principles, this book tells the compelling story of his metamorphosis from a distinguished physical scientist into a courageous, outspoken dissident humanitarian voice. His extraordinary life saw him go from playing the leading role in designing and building the most powerful thermonuclear weapon (the so-called hydrogen bomb) ever exploded to demanding an end to the testing of such weapons and their eventual elimination. The essays detail his transformation, as he appealed first to his scientific colleagues abroad and then to mankind at large, for solidarity in resolving the growing threats to human survival, many of which stemmed from science and technology. Ultimately, the distinguished contributors show how the work and thinking of this eminent Russian nuclear physicist and courageous human rights campaigner can help find solutions to the nuclear threats of today.

    Seller Inventory # 84099

  • Jackson, Ross J. (Technical Editor)

    Published by The Dow Chemical Company, Rocky Flats Division, Golden, CO, 1972

    Seller: Ground Zero Books, Ltd., Silver Spring, MD, U.S.A.
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    Multi-Ring Binder. Condition: Good. Distribution letter laid in. Information on previous owner inside the front cover. Cover has some wear and soiling. The contents include Uranium-4% Niobium (27 pages); Uranium-6% Niobium (19 pages), and Wrought Ingot-Source Beryllium (8 pages). This is the first printed collection of the Rocky Flats Materials Datasheets. It was hoped that the Datasheets will provide an effective means of transmitting materials data to interested parties at Rocky Flats and at other U.S.A.E.C. facilities. The Data Organization addresses: General, Applications, Composition Limits, Structure, Fabrication, Heat Treating, Mechanical Properties, Elastic Properties, Plastic Properties, Thermal Properties, Electrical, Optical and Magnetic Properties, Corrosion, and Testing. The present incomplete collection of datasheets is the start of an effort to summarize in one place, pertinent information concerning materials of interest at the Rocky Flats Plant. Data have been gathered from published and unpublished Rocky Fats work, other AEC sponsored research, and from the open literature. When appropriate, reference are provided to the original source. Additional datasheets were intended to be included as they were completed, and data sheets already issued would be revised periodically to keep their information current. The organization of data is a compromise between that suggested by the Aerospace Structural Metals Handbook and the ASM Metals Handbook. The data for each alloy of family of alloys are presented in the order designated by the data organization listing. When specific data are unavailable, the corresponding section is often omitted with no further explanation. The datasheets are published to provide engineers with a compilation of data on materials of interest at the Rocky Flats Plant. Some of the values presented are preliminary and are given to provide currently available data for immediate use even though their accuracy may not be well established. First Edition [Stated], First Printing [Stated] [Per transmittal letter].

    Seller Inventory # 84123

  • Black, Richard M. (Consulting Engineer)

    Published by Richard M. Black, Reno, NV, 1962

    Seller: Ground Zero Books, Ltd., Silver Spring, MD, U.S.A.
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    Comb binding. Condition: Very good. Unpaginated (32 pages, printed on single side of the sheet, plus covers). Rear cover creased. Maps. Fold-outs. Illustrated front cover. RARE surviving copy. This report is a comparison of merits of Crystal Springs town site and Aurora town site (located in Southern Nevada, adjoining the Nevada Atomic Test Site) to serve the people employed at Mercury Test Site and Test Site Area #3. The plan consists of construction of a lake, newly created community, encompassing complete services for residential and commercial, recreational, hospital, schools, electricity, water, gas, sewer systems to serve the needs of the people employed at Mercury Test Site and Test Site Area #3. The report concludes that "It is obvious that Crystal Springs Town Site, being approximately one-half the distance between Mercury and Test Site Area #3, will better serve the employees rather than the Aurora Town Site. Among the factors considered were location, water analysis, recreation, irrigation, Soil's report, time element, financing, and comparison of merits. Information in this document indicates it was prepared circa 1962. Crystal Springs is a ghost town in the Pahranagat Valley region of Lincoln County, Nevada in the United States. The ghost town is located at the junction of State Route 318 and State Route 375 (Extraterrestrial Highway), just northwest of U.S. Route 93. It is a popular destination for passersby who want to visit the towns of Hiko and Rachel. The namesake of the ghost town, the Crystal Springs, lies nearby; it is a large group of marshes and springs along the White River. Crystal Springs provides irrigation for multiple nearby ranches and farms, some of which lie over 5 miles away from the springs. The ghost town is marked as Nevada Historical Marker 205 (Crystal Springs). It is located not far from the Nevada Test Site. Aurora is a ghost town in Mineral County in the west central part of the US state of Nevada, approximately 22 miles southwest of the town of Hawthorne, three miles from the California border. The town was dominated by a harsh climate with violent and unpredictable weather, which made a permanent settlement increasingly difficult without outside support. There were a few attempts to revive the city, but those were not successful with the last attempt ending in 1918. Presumed First Edition, First printing of a limited number of copies.

    Seller Inventory # 84112

  • Day, Charles (Editor-in-Chief)

    Published by American Institute of Physics, Melville, NY, 2016

    Seller: Ground Zero Books, Ltd., Silver Spring, MD, U.S.A.
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    Wraps. Condition: Good. 76 pages, plus covers. Illustrations (many with color). Corner of front cover creased. The featured articles are: Do quantum spin liquids Exist? by Takashi Imai and Young S. Lee; Meghnad Saha: Physicist and nationalist by Somaditya Banerjee; and The Big Science of stockpile stewardship by Victor H. Reis, Robert J. Hanrahan, and W. Kirk Levedahl. Victor Herbert Reis (born 11 February 1935) is a technologist and former U.S. government official, best known as the architect and original sponsor of the U.S. nuclear Stockpile Stewardship Program and its associated Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI), which resulted in the creation of several new generations of government-sponsored supercomputers. This Reis et al article addresses that In the quarter century since the US last exploded a nuclear weapon, an extensive research enterprise has maintained the resources and know-how needed to preserve confidence in the country's stockpile. Meghnad Saha FRS (6 October 1893 - 16 February 1956) was an Indian astrophysicist who developed the Saha ionization equation, used to describe chemical and physical conditions in stars. His work allowed astronomers to accurately relate the spectral classes of stars to their actual temperatures. He was elected to the Parliament of India in 1952 from Kolkata. Banerjee is the History of Science Section Chair at the Tennessee Academy of Science. Physics Today is the membership magazine of the American Institute of Physics. First published in May 1948, it is issued on a monthly schedule, and is provided to the members of ten physics societies, including the American Physical Society. It is also available to non-members as a paid annual subscription. The magazine informs readers about important developments in overview articles written by experts, shorter review articles written internally by staff, and also discusses issues and events of importance to the science community in politics, education, and other fields. The magazine provides a historical resource of events associated with physics. For example it discussed debunking the physics of the Star Wars program of the 1980s, and the state of physics in China and the Soviet Union during the 1950s and 1970s. Presumed First Edition, First printing of this issue.

    Seller Inventory # 84101

  • Armistead, John (Editor)

    Published by Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, 1978

    Seller: Ground Zero Books, Ltd., Silver Spring, MD, U.S.A.
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    Wraps. Condition: Good. Bill Jack Rodgers (Photography) and Johnnie Martin (illustrator). 24 pages, plus covers. Illustrations. Cover has some wear and soiling. Mailing label on back cover. The Atom was published between 1964 and 1980. This issue has articles entitled Radioactive Waste, Soil Interaction; LASL Has a New Logo; Nuclear Safeguards Pioneering; In Recognition, and New Facility Gets Plutonium. This issue also includes the following regular features: Short Subjects, Among Our Guests, Photo Short, and 10 Years Ago. The front cover shows the new LASL logo. From the 10 years ago section, in 1968 the old log cabin on Pajarito Road, less than 60 years old but probably the oldest building in Los Alamos County, had been restored to like-new condition by Boy Scout Troop 229. Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos or LANL for short) is a United States Department of Energy national laboratory initially organized during World War II for the design of nuclear weapons as part of the Manhattan Project. It is located a short distance northwest of Santa Fe, New Mexico in the southwestern United States. Los Alamos was selected as the top secret location for bomb design in late 1942, and officially commissioned the next year. At the time it was known as Project Y, one of a series of laboratories located across the United States given letter names to maintain their secrecy. Los Alamos was the center for design and overall coordination, while the other labs, today known as Oak Ridge and Hanford, concentrated on the production of uranium and plutonium bomb fuels. Los Alamos was the heart of the project, collecting together some of the world's most famous scientists, among them numerous Nobel Prize winners. The site was known variously as Project Y, Los Alamos Laboratory, and Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory through this period. Presumed First Edition, First printing thus this issue.

    Seller Inventory # 84125

  • Emin, I. (Editor)

    Published by Consultants Bureau, Inc, New York, 1957

    Seller: Ground Zero Books, Ltd., Silver Spring, MD, U.S.A.
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    Wraps. Condition: Fair. [2], 195, [1] pages. Text is in Russian and English. Cover worn and soiled with corner of back cover torn off. Ex-library with usual library markings. This glossary incorporates all terms of the Russian - English Dictionary of Nuclear Physics and Engineering by N. N. Ershov, Y. V. Semenov, and A. I. Cherny (Ed. -- D. I. Voskoboinik, D. Sc.) published by the Institute of Scientific Information of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR. More than 2,000 additional terms have been added. This first glossary is a compilation of Russian terms and expressions used in nuclear physics, atomic energy, and related fields. It includes expressions fond in several thousand pages of the most recent issues of Soviet journals, especially the JOURNAL of EXPERIMENTAL and THEORETICAL PHYSICS, the Physics Section of the PROCEEDINGS (DOKLADY)OF THE USSR ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, the JOURNAL OF TECHNICAL PHYSICS and the JOURNAL OF ATOMIC ENERGY. With the vocabulary thus obtained we have combined existing bilingual dictionaries published in the USSR but not generally available in the United States. The Academy of Sciences of the USSR made such dictionaries available to this project. The Editor was associated with a number of Russian-English technical dictionaries published by the Consultants Bureau and later by Wiley. This is an early post World War II/Cold War era Russian English technical glossary. It is not a dictionary because it does not provide definitions, just the word or phrase in the other language. Nevertheless, this is an important data point that can be used to help determine how specific technical terms might have been used and understood in the initial Atoms for Peace Eisenhower program era. Presumed First Edition, First printing thus.

    Seller Inventory # 84120

  • Hunner, Jon

    Published by University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, OK, 2004

    ISBN 10: 0806136340ISBN 13: 9780806136349

    Seller: Ground Zero Books, Ltd., Silver Spring, MD, U.S.A.
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    Hardcover. Condition: Very good. Dust Jacket Condition: Very good. First Printing [Stated]. x, [2], 288, [4] pages. List of Illustrations. Maps. Notes. Bibliography. Index. Contents include Introduction; Rendezvous at Site Y: The Instant City; Fishing in the Desert with Fat Man: Civic Tension, Atomic Explosion; Postwar Los Alamos: Exodus, New Growth, and Invisible Danger; Los Alamos Transformed: Federal Largesse and Red Challenge; A Cold War Community Up in Arms: Competition and Conformity; Toward Normalizing Los Alamos: Cracking the Gates; and Atomic City on a Hill: Legacy and Continuing Research. A narrative history focuses on how the inhabitants of Los Alamos, New Mexico, confronted both the rush to create an atomic bomb and the intensity of the subsequent Cold War era, in a study of a community's first fifteen years as home to a national laboratory. It explores the momentous events that created the town, the lives of the families who lived there, and the impact this small community had on the creation and development of the Atomic Age. Jon Hunner was a Professor of History at New Mexico State University. Dr. Hunner taught at New Mexico State University from 1995 to 2018. He specialized in 20th century U.S. history and Public History. He received his Ph.D. from the University of New Mexico, and is the author of Inventing Los Alamos, J. Robert Oppenheimer, the Cold War and the Atomic West, and other works. He previously served as director of the New Mexico History Museum. Extracts from a published review by John Norris of the National Resources Defense Council: The opening chapter recounts the story of how Los Alamos became the central scientific laboratory of the Manhattan Project. Hunner sets the scene describing the evolving community amidst the spectacular landscape of northern New Mexico. Hunner's contribution to the extensive literature about this unique place is to examine Los Alamos in broader terms than just the scientific ones that are at the center of most accounts. During the war years life was difficult. With the end of the war Los Alamos changed dramatically. While staff felt jubilation and pride that the bomb had helped end a horrible war, their feelings were mixed with concern about what sort of world the country was about to enter. Hunner describes a tension that serves as his main theme. On the one hand is Los Alamos's struggle to become a normal community occupied by American families who, like their counterparts elsewhere, were searching for security and normalcy in an uncertain world. He describes how a school system was established, how they entertained themselves, practiced their religions, built suitable housing, and pursued the many other activities that constitute normal town life. Juxtaposed against this was the reality that Los Alamos was a unique and privileged enclave, funded by the federal government to fight the Cold War and build bombs that could, if ever used, end civilization, a haunting psychological weight for its inhabitants. Hunner argues that somewhat unavoidably Los Alamos became the model community for the new atomic age. In the aftermath of the first Soviet atomic explosion in August 1949 and the outbreak of the Korean War the following year, Los Alamos's funding and population grew significantly as Washington decided to develop the hydrogen bomb and mass-produce nuclear weapons of every sort. Not everything was rosy on the mesa though. Hunner describes some of the dysfunctional elements that affected Los Alamos, such as extramarital affairs and alcoholism, the latter a commonplace among the bored housewives living in an isolated community in the early 1950s. Hunner also discusses topics such as class differences and ethnic diversity and the tensions they elicited. When the idea of opening the town was raised, an overwhelming majority wanted to keep the fences up in order to preserve the sense of safety and security. But the fences could not keep the world out. Hunner treats the impact the 1954 J. Robert Oppenheimer security affair had on Los Alamos as a case in point. Finally in 1957 the fences and guardhouses surrounding the residential areas did come down. Hunner includes three dozen photographs, two maps, 40 pages of notes, and a bibliography that testify to a solidly researched book. Hunner has chosen an interesting angle to view Los Alamos and has brought into focus some of the complexities and consequences of living with the bomb at the place where it was born.

    Seller Inventory # 84134

  • Rapoport, Roger

    Published by E. P. Dutton & Co, New York, 1972

    ISBN 10: 0525116109ISBN 13: 9780525116103

    Seller: Ground Zero Books, Ltd., Silver Spring, MD, U.S.A.
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    Hardcover. Condition: Very good. Dust Jacket Condition: Very good. Second printing [stated]. 160 pages. Index. The contents include: Fun with Fatman; The Manufacturers; Production, Testing, Defense, Offense, Postattack, Occupational Health, Promotion, Conclusion, and Epilogue. Roger Rapoport is a journalist, author, and feature film producer/screenwriter. His articles appear in such publications as Stat News, the Los Angeles Times, San Francisco Chronicle, Detroit Free Press and the Miami Herald. He has also published in many national magazines. Roger Rapoport has written a book that bides to be a classic of the muckraker's art. This work is both a chronicle of how are nuclear war machine, in the opinion of the author, does not work and a citizen's call for unilateral withdrawal by the United States from the building and testing of nuclear weapons. An intriguing articulation of this perspective. Major nuclear threat to America emanates from Washington, not Moscow or Peking. Mindless design, production, testing and transport of nuclear weapons may be a greater threat to national security and all our enemies, real or imaginary. Roger Rapport his written a book that bids to be a classic of the muckraker's art. His research has taking him to the super secret H-bomb assembly plant in Texas, to Nevada test site, to Pentagon friends like NORAD which coordinates our nuclear defense with a radar system that once detected an incoming ballistic missile that turned out to be the moon. A searing and searching indictment of both the Pentagon in the Atomic Energy Commission, the Great American Bomb Machine is both a chronicle of how are nuclear war machine doesn't work and a citizen's call for unilateral withdrawal by the United States from the building and testing of nuclear weapons. Nuclear weapons makers have spent over 30 billion dollars to supposedly make America safe for democracy. Their network extends from Florida to Alaska, and comprises a greater threat to our national security than all our enemies real or imaginary. The quality of the average nuclear bomb is controlled little better than the quality of the average mass-produced automobile. The defects in production have resulted in accidental detonations. The nuclear weapons makers have raised our nations infant mortality rate, permanently contaminated 250 square miles in Nevada, hiked the cancer rate in Denver, triggered small earthquakes in Las Vegas, contaminated Alaskan caribou and committed countless thousands of other atrocities in the name of safety and peace.

    Seller Inventory # 84136

  • Armistead, John (Editor)

    Published by Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, 1978

    Seller: Ground Zero Books, Ltd., Silver Spring, MD, U.S.A.
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    Wraps. Condition: Good. Jeffrey Pederson (Photography) (illustrator). 20 pages, plus covers. Illustrations. Cover has some wear and soiling. Mailing label on front cover. The Atom was published between 1964 and 1980. This issue celebrates LASL in its 35th year. It has articles entitled After 35 Years, Harold Agnew Talks, Charles Browne Comments; LASL and Robert Thorn; Richard Taschek Speaks Out; The Push to Build A Bomb; and Faces and Places. This issue also announced Jeffrey Pederson as the new Editor of The Atom. Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos or LANL for short) is a United States Department of Energy national laboratory initially organized during World War II for the design of nuclear weapons as part of the Manhattan Project. It is located a short distance northwest of Santa Fe, New Mexico in the southwestern United States. Los Alamos was selected as the top secret location for bomb design in late 1942, and officially commissioned the next year. At the time it was known as Project Y, one of a series of laboratories located across the United States given letter names to maintain their secrecy. Los Alamos was the center for design and overall coordination, while the other labs, today known as Oak Ridge and Hanford, concentrated on the production of uranium and plutonium bomb fuels. Los Alamos was the heart of the project, collecting together some of the world's most famous scientists, among them numerous Nobel Prize winners. The site was known variously as Project Y, Los Alamos Laboratory, and Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory through this period. Presumed First Edition, First printing thus this issue.

    Seller Inventory # 84129

  • Fraser, Antonia

    Published by Doubleday [Nana A. Talese], New York, 2010

    ISBN 10: 0385532504ISBN 13: 9780385532501

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    Hardcover. Condition: Very good. Dust Jacket Condition: Very good. vii, [1], 328 pages. Part One: First Night; Pleasure and a Good Deal of Pain; Reader, We Lived Together.; Theatre of the World; Our Newfoundland; Open--Boating; A Super Study; It Is Here; Part Two: Writing Images Unreasonable but Right?; Moon over Prague; Stage Wife; Marriage--Again; Moonlight and Ashes; France: Celebration; Part Three: The Steps Downward; The New Dead; Worst of Times, Best of Times; Fortitude; and I'll Miss You So Much. Lady Antonia Margaret Caroline Fraser, CH, DBE, FRSL (née Pakenham; born 27 August 1932) is a British author of history, novels, biographies and detective fiction. Antonia Fraser recounts the life she shared with the internationally renowned dramatist. In essence, it is a love story and a marvelously insightful account of their years together, beginning with their initial meeting when Fraser was the wife of a member of parliament ad the mother of six and Pinter was married to a distinguished actress. Over the years they experienced much joy, a shared devotion to their work, crises and laughter, and, in the end, great courage and love as Pinter battled the illness as Pinter battled the illness to which he eventually succumbed on Christmas Eve 2008. Must You Go? is based on fraser's recollections and on the diaries she has kept since October 1968.Must You Go; is based on Fraser's recollections and on the diaries she has kept since October 1968. She shares Pinter's own revelations about his past, as well as observations by his friends. Harold Pinter and Antonia lived together from August 1975 until his death 33 years later. Harold Pinter CH CBE (10 October 1930 - 24 December 2008) was a British playwright, screenwriter, director and actor. A Nobel Prize winner, Pinter was one of the most influential modern British dramatists with a writing career that spanned more than 50 years. His best-known plays include The Birthday Party (1957), The Homecoming (1964), and Betrayal (1978), each of which he adapted for the screen. His screenplay adaptations of others' works include The Servant (1963), The Go-Between (1971), The French Lieutenant's Woman (1981), The Trial (1993), and Sleuth (2007). He also directed or acted in radio, stage, television, and film productions of his own and others' works. A moving testament to one of the literary world's most celebrated marriages: that of the greatest playwright of our age, Harold Pinter, and the beautiful and famous prize-winning biographer Antonia Fraser. Fraser's diaries, written by a biographer living with a creative artist and observing the process firsthand, also provide a unique insight into his writing. Harold Pinter and Antonia Fraser lived together from August 1975 until his death thirty-three years later. O! call back yesterday, bid time return, cries one of the courtiers to Richard II. This is Antonia Fraser's uniquely compelling way of doing so. First United States Edition [stated]. First printing [stated].

    Seller Inventory # 84095

  • Libby, Willard Frank, and Libby, Leona Marshall (Editor)

    Published by Geo Science Analytical, Inc. and University of California at Los Angeles, Santa Monica, CA and Los Angeles, CA, 1981

    ISBN 10: 0941054020ISBN 13: 9780941054027

    Seller: Ground Zero Books, Ltd., Silver Spring, MD, U.S.A.
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    Trade paperback. Condition: Good. Presumed First Edition, First printing. Various paginations (400 pages per bibliographic reference). Footnotes. Figures. Tables. References. Ex-Los Alamos National Laboratory library with usual library markings. This collection of W. F. Libby's papers contains those on Radiochemistry, Hot Atoms, namely the chemistry of atoms, ions, radicals, ligands, and chemical entities excited to energies far beyond those commonly tested at ordinary temperatures. This volume also contains important papers about synthetic metals, synthetic catalysts to replace platinum and platinum group metals, and synthetic superconductors, with the promise and possibility of new synthetic superconductors solving the hopes to discover superconductors at temperatures far above that of liquid hydrogen. This includes a two page write-up by W. G. McMillan on Willard Libby and the Manhattan Project and a five page letter from John A. McCone to Mrs. Leona Libby on Dr. Libby's service to the Atomic Energy Commission. Willard Frank Libby (December 17, 1908 - September 8, 1980) was an American physical chemist noted for his role in the 1949 development of radiocarbon dating, a process which revolutionized archaeology and paleontology. For his contributions to the team that developed this process, Libby was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1960. A 1931 chemistry graduate of the University of California, Berkeley, from which he received his doctorate in 1933, he studied radioactive elements and developed sensitive Geiger counters to measure weak natural and artificial radioactivity. During World War II he worked in the Manhattan Project's Substitute Alloy Materials (SAM) Laboratories at Columbia University, developing the gaseous diffusion process for uranium enrichment. After the war, Libby accepted professorship at the University of Chicago's Institute for Nuclear Studies, where he developed the technique for dating organic compounds using carbon-14. He also discovered that tritium similarly could be used for dating water, and therefore wine. In 1950, he became a member of the General Advisory Committee (GAC) of the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). He was appointed a commissioner in 1954, becoming its sole scientist. He sided with Edward Teller on pursuing a crash program to develop the hydrogen bomb, participated in the Atoms for Peace program, and defended the administration's atmospheric nuclear testing. Libby resigned from the AEC in 1959 to become Professor of Chemistry at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), a position he held until his retirement in 1976. In 1962, he became the Director of the University of California statewide Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP).

    Seller Inventory # 84111

  • Schelling, Thomas C.

    Published by Yale University Press, New Haven, 2008

    ISBN 10: 0300143370ISBN 13: 9780300143379

    Seller: Ground Zero Books, Ltd., Silver Spring, MD, U.S.A.
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    Trade paperback. Condition: Good. xvi, [2], 312, [6] pages. Wraps. Footnotes. Index. With a New Preface and Afterword. Cover has some wear and soiling. Topics covered include the diplomacy of violence, the art of commitment, the manipulation of risk, the idiom of military action, the diplomacy of ultimate survival, the dynamics of mutual alarm, the dialogue of competitive armament, and the legacy of Hiroshima. The Afterword is "An astonishing Sixty Years: The Legacy of Hiroshima." This was written under the auspices of the Harvard Center for International Affairs. Part comes from the Henry L. Stimson Lectures at Yale University. Thomas Crombie Schelling (April 14, 1921 - December 13, 2016) was an American economist and professor of foreign policy, national security, nuclear strategy, and arms control at the School of Public Policy at University of Maryland, College Park. He was awarded the 2005 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences (shared with Robert Aumann) for "having enhanced our understanding of conflict and cooperation through game-theory analysis." Traditionally, Americans have viewed war as an alternative to diplomacy, and military strategy as the science of victory. Today military power is not so much exercised as threatened. It is, Mr. Schelling says, bargaining power, and the exploitation of this power, for good or evil, to preserve peace or to threaten war, is diplomacy--the diplomacy of violence. The author concentrates in this book on the way in which military capabilities are used, skillfully or clumsily, as bargaining power. He sees the steps taken by the U.S. during the Berlin and Cuban crises as not merely preparations for engagement, but as signals to an enemy, with reports from the adversary's own military intelligence as our most important diplomatic communications. He carries forward the analysis so brilliantly begun in his earlier "The Strategy of Conflict" and "Strategy and Arms Control", and makes a significant contribution to the growing literature on modern war and diplomacy. An exemplary text on the interplay of national purpose and military force."--"Book Week." "One of the most frightening previews which this reviewer has ever seen of the roads that lie just ahead in warfare."--"Los Angeles Times. First Printing [Stated] of this 2008 Edition.

    Seller Inventory # 84094

  • Rudy, E., and Windisch, St

    Published by Air Force Systems Command, Air Force Materials Laboratory, Research and Technology Division, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, 1966

    Seller: Ground Zero Books, Ltd., Silver Spring, MD, U.S.A.
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    Comb binding. Condition: Good. xix, 212, [2] pages. Printed on both sides of the sheet. Figures. Tables. References. Formulae. Ex-Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory library. Staple remains in front cover. Marked LIMITED ACCESS. This document is subject to special export controls, and each transmittal to foreign governments or foreign nationals may be made only with prior approvals of Metals and Ceramics Division, Air Force Materials Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. It is understood that given the passage of time and the general increase in scientific and technical knowledge and information now generally publicly available that this limitation is no longer applicable. The authors worked for the Aerojet-General Corporation. Abstract: The ternary alloy systems Ti-B-C, Zr-B-C, and Hf-B-C have been investigated by means of X-ray, metallographic, melting point, and differential-thermoanalytical techniques. The experimental alloy material comprised of hot-pressed and sintered, arc and electron-beam molten, as well as high temperature equilibrated and quenched, specimens; each phase of the experimental work was support by chemical analysis. the results of this investigation are discussed and possible fields of application outlined. Aerojet developed from a 1936 meeting hosted by Theodore von Kármán at his home. Joining von Kármán, who was at the time director of Guggenheim Aeronautical Laboratory at the California Institute of Technology, were a number of Caltech professors and students, including rocket scientist and astrophysicist Fritz Zwicky and explosives expert Jack Parsons, all of whom were interested in the topic of spaceflight. The group continued to occasionally meet, but its activities were limited to discussions rather than experimentation. Their first design was tested on August 16, 1941, consisting of a small cylindrical solid-fuel motor attached to the bottom of a plane. Takeoff distance was shortened by half, and the USAAF placed an order for experimental production versions. The company expanded greatly during WWII and afterwards. Presumed First Edition, First printing thus.

    Seller Inventory # 84107

  • Petty, R. L.

    Published by Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, 1988

    Seller: Ground Zero Books, Ltd., Silver Spring, MD, U.S.A.
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    Wraps. Condition: Very good. viii, 116 pages. Figures. Tables. References. Appendices. The principal objectives of the EC-Series experiment were to provide comparative irradiation data on advanced alloy claddings (D9-C1 and D21) relatives to 20% cold-worked Type 316 stainless steel (316SS) and to increase the data base for mixed-carbide fuel pins for confirmation of the bond decision and design concept selection in support of a proposed partial core loading for the Fast Test Reactor (FTR). The scope of the experiment included tests of helium-bonded fuel pins operating at peal hot-spot temperature conditions, and operating at mid-plane of the fueled region in a 91-pin FTR assembly and sodium-bonded fuel pins operating at peak hot-spot temperature conditions. The cover has this statement: Applied Technology: Any further distribution by any holder of this document or data therein to third parties representing foreign interests, foreign governments, foreign companies, and foreign subsidiaries or foreign divisions of U.S. companies shall be approved by the Associate Deputy Assistant Secretary for Reactor Systems, Development and Technology, U.S. Department of Energy. Further, foreign party release may require DOE approval pursuant to Federal Regulation 10 CFR Part 810 and/or may be subject to Section 127 of the Atomic Energy Act. Note: it is understood that based upon the passage of time, de-emphasis in the United States in Breeder Reactor technology, and the general advance of knowledge available in the private sector, that this limitation is no longer applicable. The liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) is a nuclear reactor that has been modified to increase the efficiency at which non-fissionable uranium-238 is converted to fissionable plutonium-239, which can be used as fuel in the production of nuclear power . The reactor uses "fast" rather than "slow" neutrons to strike a uranium-238 nucleus, resulting in the formation of plutonium-239. In a second modification, it uses a liquid metal, usually sodium, rather than neutron-absorbing water as a more efficient coolant. Since the reactor produces new fuel as it operates, it is called a breeder reactor. The main appeal of breeder reactors is that they provide an alternative way of obtaining fissionable materials. The supply of natural uranium in the earth's crust is fairly large, but it will not last forever. Plutonium-239 from breeder reactors might become the major fuel used in reactors built a few hundred or thousand years from now. However, the potential of LMFBRs has not as yet been realized. One serious problem involves the use of liquid sodium as coolant. Sodium is a highly corrosive metal and in an LMFBR it is converted into a radioactive form, sodium-24. Accidental release of the coolant from such a plant could, therefore, constitute a serious environmental hazard. In addition, plutonium itself is difficult to work with. It is one of the most toxic substances known to humans, and its release presents long-term environmental problems. Presumed First Edition, First printing thus.

    Seller Inventory # 84104

  • Drell, Sidney D., and Goodby, James E.

    Published by Hoover Institution Press, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 2003

    ISBN 10: 0817944729ISBN 13: 9780817944728

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    Trade paperback. Condition: Very good. First Printing [Stated]. xii, [2], 134, [4] pages. Figure. Index. Foreword by George P. Shultz. Hoover Institution Press Publication Number 524. The book is organized as follows: Introduction: The Nuclear Danger, Chapter I. From the Past to the Present; II. Looking Forward; III Denial Policies; IV. Defining Diplomacy's Task; V. Achieving Rollback: The Instruments of Diplomacy; VI. Applying Recommended Policies to Specific Cases; and VII. Conclusion. Sidney David Drell (September 13, 1926 - December 21, 2016) was an American theoretical physicist and arms control expert. He was professor emeritus at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) and senior fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution. Drell was a noted contributor in the fields of quantum electrodynamics and high-energy particle physics. The Drell-Yan process is partially named for him. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois in 1949. He co-authored the textbooks Relativistic Quantum Mechanics and Relativistic Quantum Fields with James Bjorken. Drell was active as a scientific advisor to the U.S. government, and was a founding member of the JASON Defense Advisory Group. He was an expert in the field of nuclear arms control and cofounder of the Center for International Security and Arms Control, now the Center for International Security and Cooperation. He was a Senior Fellow at Stanford's Hoover Institution. He was a trustee Emeritus at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey. James E. Goodby has served in the US Foreign Service, achieving the rank of Career Minister, and was appointed to five ambassadorial-rank positions by Presidents Carter, Reagan, and Clinton. Ambassador Goodby has worked with former Secretary of State George Shultz at Hoover since 2007. He is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution. He was a Distinguished Service Professor at Carnegie Mellon University from 1989 to 1999 and is now a professor emeritus. During his Foreign Service career he was involved as a negotiator or as a policy adviser in the creation of the International Atomic Energy Agency, the negotiation of the limited nuclear test ban treaty, START, the Conference on Disarmament in Europe, and cooperative threat reduction (the Nunn-Lugar program). Goodby is the author and editor of several books. With Sidney Drell he wrote The Gravest Danger: Nuclear Weapons and the essay A World without Nuclear Weapons: End-State Issues. Goodby coedited Reykjavik Revisited: Steps toward a World Free of Nuclear Weapons (Hoover Institution Press, 2008) and contributed essays to Reykjavik Revisited and Implications of the Reykjavik Summit on Its Twentieth Anniversary. The mortal danger of nuclear weapons is unique in its terrifying potential for devastation on an unprecedented and unimaginable scale. In this book, Sidney D. Drell and James E. Goodby, each with more than twenty years' experience in national security issues both in public and private capacities, review the main policy issues surrounding nonproliferation of nuclear weapons. They address the specific actions that the community of nations, with American leadership, should take to confront and turn back the nuclear danger that imperils humanity. The nuclear genie, say the authors, cannot be put back in the bottle. Our most urgent task as a nation today is to successfully manage, contain, and reduce the grave danger of nuclear weapons, whether in the hands of adversaries or friendly states. This book hopes to stimulate active public dialogue on this important subject.

    Seller Inventory # 84097