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  • Seller image for THE HISTORY OF NEW-ENGLAND CONTAINING AN IMPARTIAL ACCOUNT OF THE CIVIL AND ECCLESIASTICAL AFFAIRS OF THE COUNTRY TO.1700. TO WHICH IS ADDED THE PRESENT STATE OF NEW-ENGLAND. WITH A NEW AND ACCURATE MAP OF THE COUNTRY. AND AN APPENDIX CONTAINING THEIR PRESENT CHARTER, THEIR ECCLESIASTICAL DISCIPLINE, AND THEIR MUNICIPAL-LAWS for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

    Two volumes. [1],vi,x,[2],330; [4],331- 712,xv,[1]pp., plus folding map and including publisher's advertisements on final printed page. Contemporary paneled calf. Boards rubbed, neatly rebacked in matching calf, leather labels. 18th-century ownership marks on front pastedown and front free endpaper of first volume. Map backed on Japan tissue. A good set. Larned has high praise for this book: "[Neal's] work was superior to anything of the kind that preceded it.his attitude is that of one who wishes to remain impartial. He deals chiefly with political, religious, and military questions, but has an interesting chapter, largely condensed from Josselyn, describing the state of New England; and he has paid some attention to legislative history.His style is often sprightly and he displays a sense of humor. For some aspects of the revolution of 1688- 1689 his work is still useful." Contains a few Indian words and sentences, with English translations. The map is an excellent depiction of New England from Long Island north. HOWES N26, "aa." PILLING, PROOF-SHEETS 2726. LARNED 992. SABIN 52140. EUROPEAN AMERICANA 720/178.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM35995

  • Townsend, David

    Published by Isaiah Thomas & Ebenezer T. Andrews, Boston, 1793

    Seller: William Reese Company - Americana, New Haven, CT, U.S.A.
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    48pp. Stitched self-wrappers. Chips to titlepage without loss of text, small clipped portions at head of terminal two leaves without loss to text, else very good. Partially unopened. [with:] [SMALL ARCHIVE OF MANUSCRIPT MATERIAL RELATING TO DAVID TOWNSEND'S SERVICE AS AN INSPECTOR OF POTASH, INCLUDING A DOCUMENT SIGNED BY JOHN HANCOCK]. See below for details. In the mid-18th century the manufacture of potash became a burgeoning cottage industry. Potash, a mineral rich substance derived from leeching, boiling, and distilling burned out ashes from wood and plants, was used extensively in the colonies to make soap, glass, and gunpowder. It was also an important fertilizer. In 1790 the very first U.S. patent was issued to Samuel Hopkins for an improved furnace in manufacturing potash, attesting to its importance. The United States would be the world's leading producer of potash into the mid-19th century. This rare pamphlet by Townsend, the Inspector of Pot and Pearl Ashes for Massachusetts, reviews the various manufacturing processes in the early period. Townsend graduated from Harvard College in 1770 and studied medicine under General Joseph Warren. At the Battle of Bunker Hill he accompanied Warren as surgeon in Bunner's regiment. During the war he was commissioned surgeon to the sixth regiment of foot, commanded by Colonel Asa Whitcomb, and later was senior surgeon to the General Hospital, Northern department. He served with the Continental army under Washington during the harsh winter at Valley Forge. On October 9, 1781 he was made surgeon-general of the hospital department. For many years and up to the time of his death he was physician in charge of the U.S. Marine Hospital in Chelsea, Massachusetts. Dr. Townsend was an active member of the Massachusetts Medical Society from 1785 to 1824, when he retired. Following the Revolution, Townsend was one of the charter members of the Society of the Cincinnati, being secretary of the Massachusetts chapter from 1817 to 1821, vice- president from 1821 to 1825, and president from 1825 to 1829. The accompanying manuscript archive is comprised of: 1) Autograph document signed by Samuel Danforth, attesting that he is personally acquainted with Dr. David Townsend and that Townsend "is well acquainted with the principles of Chemistry in general and that from his particular application, he is well qualified to execute the business of a Assay of Pot & Pearl Ashes." Boston. June 16, 1791. [1]p. 2) Manuscript document signed by Justice of the Peace Samuel Bennett, attesting that Dr. David Townsend has "made oath that he would faithfully perform the duties of the Office of Inspector of Pot Ashes & Pearl Ashes to which he is appointed." July 16, 1791. [1]p. Lower blank portion of sheet clipped. 3) Manuscript document signed by John Hancock as governor of Massachusetts, an act concerning the fees for inspecting pot and pearl ashes. Boston. March 26, 1793. [1 1/4]pp. 4) Manuscript contemporary true copy of the above by John Avery Jr. 5) Manuscript document signed by N. Goodale, Clerk of the District of Massachusetts, acknowledging that David Townsend has registered the title of his "Principles and observations applied to the manufacture and inspection of pot and pearl ashes." November 10, [1793]. [1]p. Paper covered wax seal. 6) Autograph letter, signed, from Samuel Eliot to David Townsend, thanking him for sending a copy of his pamphlet, "which as far as I can judge must be greatly serviceable to the manufacturing & commercial interests of the State." May 29, 1796. [1]p. EVANS 26270. RINK 3169. SABIN 96377.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM46707

  • Seller image for THE PACIFIC COAST AUTOMOBILE 1915 1916 BLUE BOOK CALIFORNIA WASHINGTON OREGON BRITISH COLUMBIA for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

    Automobile Travel]

    Published by Pacific Coast Blue Book Publishing Co., San Francisco, 1915

    Seller: William Reese Company - Americana, New Haven, CT, U.S.A.
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    [2],908 [i.e. 898]pp., (page 438 misnumbered as 448 and continued to end), including numerous road maps, advertisements, and illustrations. Printed on blue-tinted paper. Recent black leather with original gilt- stamped leather covers attached to boards. Light shelf wear. Some staining to foredge, else internally quite clean. Very good plus. An early automobile road guide for the West coast, featuring hundreds of itineraries, route maps, and advertisements to facilitate travel. The AUTOMOBILE BLUE BOOK series was started by Hartford businessman and automobile enthusiast Charles Howard Gillette in 1901 and continued through 1929. Designed to present routes between major cities by way of turn-by-turn directions (the first numbered highways didn't appear until 1918, making long distance road maps unhelpful for navigation), by 1907 the company was employing countless cars and professional "pathfinders" to create and update its routes. While generally inadequate to navigation on their own, the guide also prints numerous simplified city and regional road maps, called "index maps," to help users orient themselves to the step-by-step directions. Blue Books are perhaps best known for their profuse advertisements - every single one of the 900 pages in this volume contains at least one advertisement, and sometimes as many as five or six. The publishers took their relationship with their advertisers seriously: the introduction to this edition states that "It is suggested that.the tourist will best protect his own interests by following the listings at the conclusions of tours in his selection of accommodations for both his party and his machine. Any mistreatment of the public by our advertisers should be promptly reported to the publishers, that we may protect users of the Blue Book through excluding offenders from future editions." While the vast majority of these advertisements are for mechanics, and automobile products, and accommodations, there are a handful of outliers, including an advertisement for Bower Cave and one for the newly established town of Westwood, California, "a little city of 3000 people" (which boasted fewer than 1500 in 2011), built in the shadow of an active volcano in Lassen County. In addition to advertisements and itineraries, the BLUE BOOK also prints digests of driving regulations for the cities and states covered, including local speed limits, rules for emergency vehicles, and the minimum legal age to operate a motor vehicle. Some towns include more particular rules as well, such as in Salem, Oregon, where drivers are implored to "use due care in endeavoring not to frighten restive horses and if requested by driver of same stop until animal is under control." OCLC records only two copies of this particular edition, at UCLA and the University of Washington. A scarce, informative, and thoroughly detailed look into the early days of automobile travel. OCLC 10212098.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM57240

  • Broadside, 17 1/4 x 12 1/2 inches. Minor splitting along folds and small separations at cross-folds. A bit of edge wear and offsetting. Very good. An extremely rare and significant Texas Confederate broadside, only the second copy that we can locate. This message from Texas Governor Pendleton Murrah calls for an extraordinary session of the Texas state legislature to convene on October 17, 1864, in order to address the rampant inflation problem facing the Confederacy. Murrah describes the recent provisions made by the Confederate Congress with regard to the value of currency, and exhorts legislators to action: "Measures more efficient and better suited to the condition of the State, must be adopted, if the appropriations for the benefit of the families of soldiers, are to avail them anything, in many localities. The difference in the value of the Confederate currency, in different portions of the State, makes this subject a difficult one; but it must be met, and the difficulties solved by you." By September 1864 (when this broadside was issued), the Confederate currency was worth three cents to the dollar compared to United States tender. In response, the Confederate Congress allowed states to exchange half of their existing currency for newly issued, higher-value bills. Murrah, recognizing that the economic measures adopted by the most recent Texas congress were doomed to failure in the face of such rapid inflation and armed with new currency based on the exchange program, calls on local governments to cease all issuing of state credit and to reconvene in October. Additionally, since "vacancies exist in several of the Senatorial and Representative Districts of this State," the governor calls for immediate elections to fill the vacancies before that time. Parrish & Willingham locates only the copy at the University of Texas. The only reference we can find to this broadside in OCLC are records for a microfilm made from an original at the University of Texas's Barker Texas History Center, apparently the same copy listed in Parrish & Willingham. An exceedingly rare broadside showing the Confederacy's desperate situation toward the end of the Civil War. PARRISH & WILLINGHAM 4529. OCLC 21930077, 1013372845 (ref).

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM57291

  • Seller image for PRINTED ROSTER OF THE 52nd IOWA INFANTRY UNITED STATES VOLUNTEERS DURING THE SPANISH- AMERICAN WAR, WITH AN ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPH OF MEMBERS OF THE 52nd IOWA INFANTRY RELAXING IN CAMP] for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

    Roster: [26]pp. (including printed inner wrappers), illustrations from photographs. Photograph 4 x 5 1/2 inches, mounted on slightly larger card stock, photographer's ink stamp on verso. Roster: 24mo. Original textured purple wrappers, stapled, front wrapper gilt. Wrappers discolored with some wear to spine. Clean internally and very good overall. Photograph is very crisp and clean with some minimal wear and staining in corners of mount. Near fine. A small roster recording the names and ranks of commissioned and non-commissioned members (including those deceased) of the 52nd Iowa Infantry during the Spanish-American War. The roster includes a variety of photographic illustrations showing their activities, camps, and equipment. The 52nd Iowa was mustered in May 1898 and was preparing to enter the conflict in Puerto Rico, although the war ended before they saw active service. Despite the fact that they never saw combat, their leader (Col. William B. Humphrey) declared in his report that "Had the opportunity presented, the regiment would have acquitted itself with honor and credit to the State." The photograph depicts eight men posing in front of a tent in varying degrees of uniform. They have set up a tripod of rifles in the center of their group, and one of the seated men is holding a small dog. The reverse of the photo mount contains the stamp of the Neal Brothers, Photographers, "In all the latest styles and sizes." Edwin Neal operated a photography studio in Keota, Iowa for over half a century, where he supposedly only used one camera throughout his entire career. Only one copy of this roster is recorded on OCLC, as part of an archival collection at the U.S. Army War College. An interesting remnant of a short-lived regiment, with an original photograph of the men who were a part of it. OCLC 794007555.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM57154

  • Iturbide, Agustín de]: [Mexican Revolution]

    Published by Oficina de D. Pedro de la Rosa, Puebla, 1821

    Seller: William Reese Company - Americana, New Haven, CT, U.S.A.
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    Broadside, 17 x 12 inches. Text in two columns. Endorsed in manuscript by Carlos Garcia. Old folds, light general wear. Very good plus. Untrimmed. A scarce broadside from Agustín de Iturbide's brief period of power in Mexico. After leading the coalition of Mexican forces which took over Mexico City in 1821, winning independence from Spain, Iturbide became president of the regency government before being made Emperor (over his own protestations) the following year. Despite his success as a military leader, Iturbide's tenure as Emperor proved less providential. A significant faction which had hoped for a republican government after independence agitated against him, particularly within Mexico's Congress. Iturbide made more enemies by dismissing the uncooperative congress a few months into his reign. He also found it difficult to gain recognition for an independent Mexico abroad and was unable to effectively pay for his army, leading to his exile in March 1823, only eight months after his coronation. This broadside, printed while Iturbide was in office as President of the Regency but before his coronation as Emperor, relays a bando from Iturbide regarding the national revenue. Among other stipulations, it notes that Mexico's indigenous populations, having lost the privileged status they held under the Spanish constitution, would now be subject to the alcabala (i.e. sales tax). The document is initialed in manuscript, likely by either D. Ramon Gutierrez himself or Carlos Garcia. Gutierrez was the first political chief of Mexico City and distributed numerous broadsides in Mexico's first year of independence, including the Mexican Declaration of Independence. Garcia was mayor of Puebla (where this broadside was distributed) in 1821, and administered the oath of office to Iturbide when he became President of the Regency. Garcia later became president of Puebla's Tribunal Supremo de Justicia, interim governor of the state, and held numerous other political posts in the First Mexican Republic. Quite a scarce document - OCLC records similar but possibly not identical copies only at Yale, University of Pennsylvania, the Biblioteca Nacional de España, and possibly the Biblioteca Nacional de México. OCLC 54269355.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM57286

  • Seller image for BLIND JOHN" IN NEW YORK IN 1861. CHARLES O'CONNOR'S ADVICE TO A YOUNG LAWYER. "THE TIGER" AND THE TOMBS for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

    Newton, John]

    Published by J.G. Ullery, Book and Job Printer, Brattleboro, Vt., 1885

    Seller: William Reese Company - Americana, New Haven, CT, U.S.A.
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    20pp. Original printed blue front wrapper (rear wrapper lacking). Front wrapper soiled, chipped around the edges and corners. Dampstain in upper margin throughout, final leaf tanned and with chips and insect damage. Good. Second edition (first published in 1883), of this brief, colorful autobiography of a lawyer and gambler. A third edition appeared in 1891, all are quite scarce. John Newton became completely blind later in life and, unable to continue practicing law, wrote about his rather checkered life to "make an honest penny." The present pamphlet is billed as an extract from a forthcoming autobiography. In it, he describes moving to New York to practice law with the express aim of making money, and his disappointment when that money was not forthcoming. In order to pay for his rather expensive lifestyle despite finding little work as a lawyer, Newton turned to gambling and almost immediately lost everything he had. He describes his feelings with a typically wry metaphor: "Although I had been beaten in my contest with the 'Tiger,' and withdrew from his lair with the subdued appearance of a man a few minutes after his mother-in-law has suddenly surprised him in the act of kissing the servant girl, yet, like him, I had got a taste, loved it, and only awaited a favorable opportunity to try it again." Other anecdotes include selling war telegrams at the outbreak of the Civil War and getting unjustly arrested and sent to the Tombs while passing by a street fight, using his lawyerly wiles to narrowly avoid a trip to Blackwell's Island. OCLC records four copies of this second edition, at the Peabody Essex Museum, the Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Center, and at Durham and Humber Colleges in Ontario. A rare, entertainingly told tale of gambling and youthful indiscretion in New York City.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM57237

  • Seller image for OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OCTOBER 15, 16, 17 1937 SECOND NATIONAL NEGRO CONGRESS [wrapper title] for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

    National Negro Congress]

    Published by National Negro Congress, [Washington, D.C., 1937

    Seller: William Reese Company - Americana, New Haven, CT, U.S.A.
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    [94]pp. including illustrations. Original printed beige wrappers. Wrappers slightly tanned and soiled. Very clean internally. Near fine. Official publication collecting the speeches, resolutions, and other proceedings of the National Negro Congress' second meeting, illustrated with photographs of many of its leading figures. The National Negro Congress (NNC) was co-founded out of Howard University in 1936 by journalist John P. Davis and Communist Party leader James W. Ford with an aim to fight for the advancement and liberation of African Americans. As part of this effort, the organization was fiercely supportive of labor unions and against the rising fascism of the 1930s, both of which deepened their ties to the Communist Party. While founded by Ford and Davis, the organization's first president was A. Philip Randolph, the unionist, politician, and leading civil rights activist who went on to successfully lobby for the end of segregation in the armed forces and organize the March on Washington. Davis, who travelled throughout the South in the early 1930s investigating lynchings and civil rights violations, was largely responsible for the day-to-day administration of the NNC, focused on problems at home in his introduction to this publication, particularly on strong and consistent support for a federal anti- lynching bill - something which to this day has yet to become law in the United States. Other topics at the Congress included support for unions and encouraging legislation to protect sharecroppers and agricultural workers. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the NNC's affiliations combined with recent events meant that their Congress of 1937 focused at least as much on conflicts in Europe, Africa, and Asia as on affairs in the United States, including resolutions to staunchly support Ethiopia against Italy, Spanish republicans against Franco, and China against Japan. Present at the proceedings was a delegation from the American Friends of the Chinese People, who implored attendees to boycott Fascist countries world-wide and lend aid to China in no meek terms: "The war that is going on in Ethiopia, Spain and China is directed against our common foes - the barbarous alliance of Mussolini, Hitler and the Japanese military fascists. A death-blow against Japanese militarism in the Far East, will mean a mighty blow at Mussolini and Hitler in Europe. Friends, our fight is your fight. Our victory is your victory. HELP US WIN." The Congress' ties to Communism ultimately hurt more than they helped, and for many years the organization was dismissed as a communist front or cynical attempt to attract Black voters, despite its equally strong ties to the budding civil rights movement and day- to-day support for underserved communities in the country: "From 1936 to 1940, the period of its greatest activity, the Congress succeeded both on the local and on the national level in removing some of the barriers to black advancement in America. Ironically, however, many of its achievements, particularly within organized labor, undercut the broadly-based program upon which it had been founded.By failing to see beyond the role of the Communist party in the career of the National Negro Congress, American scholars have ignored much of the meaning of the past, while contributing to the paranoias of the present" (Wittner). OCLC locates copies of these proceedings of the second NNC Congress at eight institutions. A rare and interesting record of an important and unusual gathering of African-American intellectuals, civil rights activists, and communist leaders on the precipice of World War II. Lawrence S. Wittner, "The National Negro Congress: A Reassessment" in AMERICAN QUARTERLY 22(4), pp.883-901 (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, Winter 1970). OCLC 38699746, 990709823.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM57219

  • Seller image for CUSTER, IDAHO - 1880 for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

    Idaho]: Hall, G.W.

    Published by Omaha Lithographic Co., Omaha, 1880

    Seller: William Reese Company - Americana, New Haven, CT, U.S.A.
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    Lithograph, 17 3/4 x 23 3/4 inches. Faint staining in the lower edge. Near fine. Matted. A rare and important view of the mining boomtown of Custer, Idaho, to our knowledge the only contemporary view of this significant mining settlement in Central Idaho. Now a ghost town, Custer was founded in 1879, in the wake of the 1876 discovery of the General Custer mine, and is located on the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River. This view of Custer is from the southwest corner of the town, which had a population of some 300 in 1880. The town's single street and the Yankee Fork River are shown running diagonally through the image, as well as a number of single and double story structures, many of them steep-roofed buildings constructed to deal with the heavy winter snows in the area. At the north end of town is the multi-story General Custer Mill, the only identified building in the view. The mill is flanked by smokestacks and has a long conveyor line snaking up the hills to another mining building. At the south end of town - which was the location of Custer's small Chinese settlement - we see a stagecoach pulled by a team of horses, as well as a waterwheel-driven mining operation. All told, there are some fifty buildings depicted in this very well-drawn and detailed view. The 1880s brought rapid growth to what is now Custer County, Idaho, as several mining settlements sprang up after the 1876 discovery of the General Custer mine. With a capacity to process nine hundred tons of ore a month, the General Custer mine alone produced an estimated $8,000,000 in gold between 1880 and 1888. At its peak, Custer had three general stores, a blacksmith, a shoe and harness shop, two restaurants, a butcher, three rooming houses and a large hotel, livery and feed stables, a furniture store, barber shops, a school, carpenter shops, five saloons, bordellos, a dance hall, two Chinese laundries, a Chinese-owned store, and a Wells Fargo office. Apparently, the only church ever built in the Yankee Fork district was a Chinese Joss House in Custer. The cemetery, school, and post office were shared by Custer and nearby Bonanza. By 1903 the gold boom had subsided as area mines were emptied. Custer soon became a ghost town, and is now a tourist destination, and part of Idaho's Land of the Yankee Fork state park. We are unable to find any information on the artist who drew this view, G.W. Hall, and this is the only view attributed to him listed in Reps. This view of Custer, Idaho is very rare. This is the only copy that we can find having appeared in the market. Reps locates only two copies, at the Amon Carter Museum, and the Idaho State Historical Society, and OCLC lists only one copy, at Yale. REPS, VIEWS AND VIEWMAKERS 765. OCLC 830054601.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM57305

  • Seller image for 1895 OBSEQUIO DE LA CASA. ARRUFANA GARRIDO, ORTIZ & CIA [cover title] for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

    Argentina]

    Published by Arrufana Garrido, Ortiz & Cia.], [Buenos Aires, Argentina, 1895

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    [80]pp., including photographic illustrations and printed advertisements. Oblong 12mo. Original pebbled red cloth tooled in blind and gilt. Boards somewhat rubbed and worn, corners worn, rear hinge separated but binding still sturdy. Text moderately tanned and with a persistent stain in the lower outer corner. Good plus. An interesting gift book from Arrufana, Garrido, & Ortiz, an importing company which operated in Buenos Aires during the 1890s. Each leaf contains a black and white photographic illustration of a scene from Buenos Aires or its surroundings on the recto with an advertisement (mostly in Spanish) printed in cyan on the verso. Among the photos of cities and dramatic landscapes are also more intimate images, including several of outdoor markets, one of a ranching family outside their straw-roofed home with their livestock, and a portrait of a family of Toba people, one of Argentina's largest indigenous groups. The illustrations, after photographs by Arturo W. Boote, are attributed to Gunche, Wiebeck, y Turtl, whose photoprinting and lithography office in Buenos Aires (advertised in this volume) printed photographs for a number of works, as well as maps of Argentina, Chile, and the surrounding areas of South America around the turn of the 20th century. The advertisements, some illustrated, offer a wide array of goods and services from firearms to pocket watches to steamboat travel. One advertisement, for a restaurant specializing in French and German cuisine, is printed side by side in Spanish and German; the text is generally the same, although the German side has an additional line that reads "Mit allem comfort der Neuzeit," which might suggest a certain outlook of European visitors towards other establishments in the city. More than just a souvenir, this gift book's variety of photos both posed and candid, rural and urban, along with its breadth of advertisements, make it a fascinating window into Argentina at the end of the 19th century. Not located on OCLC.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM57189

  • Seller image for THE CIVIL WAR DIARY 1862 - 1865 OF CHARLES H. LYNCH, 18th CONN. VOL'S for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

    Lynch, Charles H.

    Published by The Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co., [Hartford, 1915

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    163pp. plus frontispiece and one plate. Original blue cloth stamped in black. Spine a bit sunned, spine ends and corners lightly worn. Light scattered foxing. Author's printed presentation note pasted to front free endpaper below contemporary ownership inscription (see below). Very good. An interesting presentation copy of this privately-printed and valuable soldier's diary. Charles H. Lynch enlisted in the 18th Connecticut Volunteers in 1862 when he was barely seventeen years old. In day-to-day fashion, Lynch outlines his observations and experiences as a soldier including his daily routines, the happy and sad moments of everyday life on the march, celebrating holidays in camp, his impressions of the people and country, and of course his experiences in battle. Lynch describes his time with Hooker's 3rd Corps on the Potomac, under General Sigel at the disastrous Battle of Newmarket (after which he was still sad to see Sigel relieved of command), being sickened by the suffering and seeing "Grumble" Jones killed at the Battle of Piedmont, and more. In 1864 his thoughts are largely concerned with Lincoln, beginning with the presidential election as it was carried out in camp ("I was not old enough to vote, though I could carry a gun and do as much duty as any man"), then describing his happiness at seeing "Old Honest Abe" reelected, and finally the shock and dismay felt by the soldiers upon the news of the President's assassination: "How sudden the change. Joy turned to sorrow.The whole camp could not do anything but talk over the sad event. We all became angry and hated the South worse than ever. Thought all the leaders should be condemned to death." Nevins describes Lynch's memoir as "An above- average diary of a soldier's experiences and observations; very good for pictures of camp life." This copy was presented with respects of the author to Joseph Twichell, a close friend of Samuel Clemens (Mark Twain). Twichell was an author and preacher from Connecticut who enlisted in the Union army at the outset of the Civil War. He was attached to the Excelsior Brigade under General Sickles and eventually joined with Hooker's division on the Potomac, where he and Lynch may well have fought together. After the Civil War, Twichell completed his religious studies and became a pastor, at which time he struck up a close, long-term friendship with Samuel Clemens, officiating Clemens's marriage and even performing the christenings of the writer's children. An eminently interesting ground-level account of the Civil War, with significant association. NEVINS I, p.123. DORNBUSCH (CONNECTICUT) 77.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM57234

  • Seller image for AUTOGRAPH LETTER, SIGNED, FROM RHODE ISLAND CONGRESSMAN DUTEE J. PEARCE TO WILLIAM A. BURGESS, DESCRIBING THE ARGUMENTS THAT LED TO THE DUEL BETWEEN JOHN RANDOLPH AND HENRY CLAY] for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

    [2]pp. autograph letter, signed, on a folded folio sheet, address and remains of wax seal on a third page. Old folds. Two tears from rough opening (no text affected), one-inch closed cut at edge of one fold (no text affected). Very good. A friendly, and rather gossipy, letter from longtime Rhode Island politician Dutee J. Pearce, replying to his friend, William A. Burgess, in Providence, Rhode Island, with news about the duel between Virginia Senator John Randolph and Secretary of State Henry Clay just the day before. Although Pearce's hand is rather rushed, one can decode his enthusiastic commentary on Randolph and Clay's absurd dispute. Pearce recounts Randolph's ad hominem attack of Clay on the Senate floor, for which Clay challenged Randolph to a duel - even though Randolph was reasonably within his rights to personally attack Clay while speaking in session. Nevertheless, Randolph accepted Clay's challenge, and they scheduled the duel for the afternoon of April 8. Randolph had let it be quietly known that he did not intend to actually shoot at Clay, thought it's not clear whether Clay knew this before the duel. Pearce writes that "they fought at ten paces." The first shot came from Randolph and was a misfire, his pistol was still pointed at the ground. Clay agreed to let him reload and they counted off again. Randolph fired again, his shot going wide as promised, and then Clay fired: "Mr Clay's ball went through Mr R's silk morning gown, grazed the skin of his belly, and would have hit his guts if he had had any." After this close call, Randolph decided to broadcast his peaceful intentions and fired his second bullet harmlessly into the air. At this, Clay called off the duel; Randolph approached Clay "and presented him his hand, and it is said they have settled all their difficulties." Supposedly (though it is not included here) Randolph told Clay, "You owe me a new coat, Mr. Clay," to which Clay reportedly responded, "I am glad the debt is no greater." Apparently, they had no further quarrel with one another. Dutee Jerauld Pearce (1789-1849) was a lawyer and politician. Initially holding local and state offices, including Attorney General of Rhode Island and as a member of the Rhode Island House of Representatives, he went on to serve as U.S. district attorney, and then from 1825-37 he was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives for Rhode Island's at-large district. Letters by Pearce are uncommon on the market and at auction, especially those dealing with such exciting episodes as found here.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM57212

  • Seller image for BENEFITS AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR COLORED CITIZENS OF MEMPHIS. CIVIC PROGRESS 1940-1944 [wrapper title] for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

    Tennessee]

    Published by [Memphis, Tn, 1944

    Seller: William Reese Company - Americana, New Haven, CT, U.S.A.
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    38pp., including illustrations, plus map on interior of rear wrapper. Pictorial wrappers, stapled. Light wear, closed tear in lower edge of front wrapper. Very good. A scarce promotional booklet produced by the Memphis Board of Commissioners for the Black population of the city during World War II. Memphis's medical services, libraries, schools, housing, and parks (all segregated) are described in glowing terms and accompanied by extensive photo illustrations. The authors claim that despite the city's high quality services for both groups, the African-American population of Memphis has been under-utilizing these resources: "There are vacant desks in many of the schools of Memphis, and a surplus of well-qualified colored teachers, yet hundreds of children are not sent to be taught.never have seen the parks and playgrounds constructed and supervised for them.[and] have never sought relief at the health centers and clinics." One section mentions the building of a memorial museum and library to "contain relics, pictures, records, works of art, magazines, books, original writings and documents, and other material illustrative of the progress of the Negro in America." Unfortunately, it does not appear that the institution, despite its "great educational and historical value to both white and colored," was ever established. The interior of the rear wrapper contains a street map titled "City of Memphis 1944" which labels the approximate locations of many of the buildings and services mentioned throughout the booklet. Quite uncommon - OCLC locates copies only at seven institutions: Stanford, Yale, Harvard, the University of Mississippi, the Memphis Public Library, University of Tennessee at Knoxville (defective), and the Wisconsin Historical Society. OCLC 6731523.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM57177

  • Seller image for THE NORMAN STUDIOS PRESENTS BLACK GOLD for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

    African-American Film]: Norman, Richard

    Published by Norman Studios, [Arlington, Fl.], 1928

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    [4]pp. Illustrated. Folio pressbook, 22 x 14 inches, printed in orange and blue. Some edge wear and edge tears. Very good. A promotional brochure aimed at cinema owners, advertising Richard Norman's final film, BLACK GOLD, a "thrilling epic of the oil fields." The film was shot with an all- Black cast on site in the "all colored city" of Tatums, Oklahoma, and is based on the true story of John Crisp and his fight to secure oil despite the efforts of a crooked drilling contractor. Tatums was historically a Freedman's town in Carter County, near Ardmore, but at the time of its founding, was located in the Chickasaw Nation. The town's namesake, first Postmaster and Marshall, L.B. Tatum, had a credited role in the film. Although the film itself is essentially "lost," a remainder of Norman film promotional paper has significantly increased the current availability of posters, pressbooks and heralds that otherwise would be presumed perishable and scarce. Richard Norman became a filmmaker in the then-hub of silent movie entertainment, Jacksonville Florida, producing eight "race" films (films with African-American casts made for African-American audiences) throughout the 1920s. Norman was a creative and aggressive advertiser (such as the time he encouraged theater owners to fill their buildings with sand to advertise his desert island adventure REGENERATION), and this promotional material for BLACK GOLD has all the hallmarks of his salesmanship. In addition to an "exact reproduction of the window card," he includes many images from the film, advertisements for his other movies, and even brief articles about the history and background of the picture, which he guarantees will "appeal to every man, woman and child in your city." Norman's studio, which closed shortly after the advent of talking films, was rediscovered in 1999 and repaired over several years. It was eventually converted into the Norman Studios Silent Film Museum, and in 2016 was designated a National Historic Landmark. OCLC records this scarce film promotional at five institutions: Yale, University of Florida, University of Virginia, Temple University, and the Autry Museum. OCLC 83264173, 39630565.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM57300

  • Seller image for OUR SCHOOLS FOR NEGROES SOMETHING OF THE HISTORY, IDEALS AND WORK OF THE AMERICAN CHURCH INSTITUTE FOR NEGROES [wrapper title] for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

    African Americana]: [American Church Institute]

    Published by New York, 1940

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    [8]pp., including photographic illustrations. 16mo. Original printed self-wrappers, stapled. Lightly creased and soiled, especially to edges and around staples, rusted paperclip mark on upper part of first two leaves. Manuscript notes in ink on final page. Very good. The American Church Institute (ACI) was founded in 1906 as an outgrowth of the Protestant Episcopal Freedman's Commission to Colored People which began in 1865, with the goal of improving educational opportunities for African Americans, particularly in the rural South. The ACI ran several schools and colleges in these communities until 1967, when it ceased oversight of those schools due to concerns about supporting segregated education in the wake of the Civil Rights Act. Several of their schools continued into the 21st century, with three of them continuing to operate today: St. Augustine's University in North Carolina, Voorhees College in South Carolina, and Fort Valley State University in Georgia. The pamphlet summarizes the ACI's achievements up to that point (supporting nine schools in eight states, including a photo illustration of students at St. Augustine's College), how it is organized, and how it is funded. Ultimately, it is a call for donations to the ACI, including a blank bequest form on page seven. The final page contains a list of the ACI's schools and their principals, several of whose names have been crossed out and updated with their successors in ink. OCLC records only one copy, at the Virginia Theological Seminary. A second copy may be located in the Archives of the Episcopal Church, but it is minimally cataloged and dated somewhat later. A scarce piece of ephemera related to these historically Black universities. OCLC 57076791.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM57180

  • Seller image for GRANNAN'S POCKET GALLERY OF NOTED CRIMINALS OF THE PRESENT DAY, CONTAINING PORTRAITS OF NOTED AND DANGEROUS CRIMINALS, PICKPOCKETS, BURGLARS, BANK SNEAKS, SAFE BLOWERS AND ALL- ROUND THIEVES for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

    Grannan Detective Bureau Co., publisher]

    Published by Published by the Grannan Detective Bureau Co.Spencer & Craig Printing Works, [Cincinnati], 1889

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    80pp., including sixty-seven portraits. Printed on pink and light blue coated stock. 16mo. Original patterned cloth. Spine endsd fraying, cloth a bit faded and worn, dampstain in fore edge. Both hinges starting, ownership inscription on front pastedown. Scattered foxing, old stain in lower edge of approximately half of text. A good copy. First edition of this significant and profusely-illustrated study of noted criminals, published by the Grannan Detective Bureau, which operated over most of the Midwest from around 1883, and appeared in Cincinnati city directories until 1905. The majority of the images and information in the book was gathered in September 1888 in Columbus, Ohio, during the National Encampment of the Grand Army of the Republic and the Ohio Centennial Exposition. The "most formidable array of detective talent that had ever been bought together" was assembled under the leadership of Chief of Police John E. Murphy of Columbus who had come up with the idea of watching the expected crowds for known criminals. The text explains that the operation was a success and "inside of eight hours.forty- two of the smartest crooks were languishing behind bars. Each was weighed and an accurate description.written down, including color of eyes, hair and complexion, height, marks, scars, and peculiar characteristics. They were then taken in squads to the photographer whose pictures of them were taken for the Rogues' Gallery. Captain Grannan obtained these photographs and is using them.The likenesses are pronounced perfect, and the portraits sent out in this book are the consummation of the engraver's skill. In addition.Captain Grannan has selected from his own private Gallery.and has also obtained a few others from the Rogues' Galleries of the police departments of the principal cities of the Union.making in all a collection of sixty- four of the greatest rogues of the present day. A few of these are not in active work [e.g. the James Gang].but are given a place on account of their great historical interest." The final few pages of engravings reproduce images of members of the James and Younger gangs, including autopsy photos of the members of Jesse James's gang who were killed during the raid in Northfield, Minnesota. The portraits themselves, taken from photographs, are quite well done, as they needed to be if they were to be used to identify the subjects. The 1892 fourth edition mentions that the images were produced "under the immediate supervision of Mr. H. W. Weisbrodt, who has no superior as a portrait engraver in the country." Weisbrdt is not mentioned in the present work but may well have been responsible. The founder of the detective bureau was Joseph C. Grannan (1832-1905), a Civil War veteran who had served as an officer with several cavalry units. Post-war he became a Cincinnati policeman, before setting up his bureau. This copy bears the ownership inscription of "Pvt. G.A. Hahn, Troop 'E' State Police Harrisburg, Pa." A scarce, exceptionally illustrated book produced by detectives, for detectives, and owned by a law enforcement officer.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM56993A

  • Seller image for SHORE LINE RAILWAY, TIME TABLE No. 9. [with:] SHORE LINE RAILWAY, TIME TABLE No. 10 for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

    Shore Line Railway]

    Published by T.J. Stafford, Printer, New Haven, 1869

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    Two sheets printed on both sides, each 9 3/4 x 13 3/4 inches. One vertical and two horizontal creases. Near fine. These are the ninth and tenth timetables for employees of Connecticut's Shore Line Railway, with "General Regulations and Special Instructions for All Trains Run on the Road" printed on the verso. The timetables show the arrival and departure times for mail, freight, and passenger trains on the route from New Haven to New London and back, below which are printed the rules and regulations for specific situations and exceptions. The General Regulations and Special Instructions on the verso provide job descriptions for different positions on the train, including conductors, enginemen, brakemen, track repairers (whose responsibilities included keeping cattle off the tracks), and others. There is also a list of situations which would lead to forfeiture of bonuses for an engineman, including hitting livestock. Other than changes to the timetable and the commensurate changes to the rules and regulations below, the content of each sheet is identical. The Shore Line Railway began construction between New Haven and New London in 1850, extending the New York and New Haven Railroad eastward. It first opened in 1852, and was eventually continued to Stonington where it joined with the western end of the New York, Providence, and Boston Railroad. Much of the Shore Line Railway continues to operate today as Shore Line East, connecting New London to New York City. An interesting and well- preserved look at the daily operation and duties of a 19th century New England railroad.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM57141

  • Harrison, William Henry]: Kirk, Edward Norris

    Published by J.W. Harrison, [New York], 1841

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    Broadside, 19 x 24 inches. Horizontal and vertical folds. Small closed tears to margins and splits along some folds, with some tape reinforcement. Good. Rare broadside advertisement for a published eulogy on President William Henry Harrison, originally delivered by Rev. Edward Norris Kirk on May 14, 1841 at the Academy of Sacred Music in New York. After the President's sudden death - the first death of a president in office - shocked the nation barely a month into his administration, a Day of National Fast was declared on which orators and preachers around the country delivered eulogies and sermons in Harrison's memory. This broadside advertises the publication in pamphlet form of the eulogy delivered by Kirk, a major religious figure in America for much of the 19th century. Kirk's ORATION ON THE OCCASION OF THE NATIONAL FAST was jointly published in New York (Office of the Iris) and Boston (J.N. Bradley & Company) in 1841. Kirk's address is equally about Harrison's qualities and accomplishments and about the state of religious faith in America at the time. Rev. Edward Norris Kirk, a "new school Calvinist," travelled extensively as a revivalist preacher, particularly in New York and New England. He is also known as the person appointed to establish the American Church in Paris, the first American church established outside the United States, securing the charter and purchasing the building it occupied on the Rue de Berri for nearly a century. In addition, Norris was an abolitionist and staunch defender of equal rights for Americans regardless of race or sex, decrying the nation's mistreatment of women, African Americans, indigenous groups, and Mexicans as its greatest sins. During the Civil War Norris preached to Union soldiers and afterwards vociferously supported Radical Reconstruction, urging the use of federal troops to protect the civil and voting rights of southern blacks. The broadside is rare; OCLC locates it only at the New-York Historical Society Library. Likely posted in shop windows or newsstands and produced in a limited number, its survival is quite remarkable. ANB 12 pp.753-4. OCLC 60952677. SABIN 37976 (ref).

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM57239

  • Seller image for LARGE PHOTOGRAPHIC PORTRAIT OF THE HAMPTON INSTITUTE GRADUATING CLASS OF 1909 PICTURING SEVENTY-ONE STUDENTS, PRIMARILY AFRICAN AMERICAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN] for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

    African-American Photographica]: [Cheyne, Christopher Ethelbert, photographer]

    Published by Cheyne's Studio, Hampton, Va., 1909

    Seller: William Reese Company - Americana, New Haven, CT, U.S.A.
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    Photographic print, 13 3/4 x 17 inches. Mounted on dark brown cardboard with photographer's sticker in lower margin, total size 19 x 21 3/4 inches. Very lightly soiled. Near fine. A significant photographic print depicting the Hampton Institute's Class of 1909, with the slogan "The life that counts is the life that serves" at top center. A total of seventy-one students are pictured; while predominantly African American, there are also Native American and White students in the group. Slightly more than half of the students are women, and all wear some variation of a men's or women's school uniform and ribbon. A slightly older White woman, likely a teacher or administrator, is also depicted in the collage. The Hampton Institute was founded in 1868 by the Freedman's Bureau and American Missionary Association with Union General Samuel Chapman Armstrong as its first head. Beginning as the Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute, it catered to Black students and almost immediately began turning out high profile African-American educators such as Booker T. Washington. Beginning in 1878, the Hampton Institute also created a formal education program for indigenous Americans, initially to support those who had been held as prisoners of war during the wars on the American Frontier. The hope was that expanding and integrating their enrollment in this way would help both Black and indigenous students become more welcome in the local community, but ultimately the program ended when the adoption of Jim Crow laws in many southern states caused indigenous students who were educated alongside African Americans to face even greater discrimination than they otherwise would have. While the Hampton Institute began and continues as a well- regarded historically Black college, it was not without its critics. Increasing pressures from donors and continued white leadership near the turn of the century led W.E.B. Dubois to say that the Institute "belongs to the white South and to the reactionary North.a center of that underground and silent intrigue which is determined to perpetuate the American Negro as a docile peasant and peon." Hampton would finally elect its first Black president in 1947. The sticker on the mounting declares this the work of Cheyne's Studio in Hampton. Christopher Ethelbert Cheyne was born in Brampton, Canada, before emigrating to Cincinnati as a young man. While there he studied photography, married, and eventually moved to Hampton, Virginia in 1894. He operated a studio in Hampton for many decades, and a large collection of his work is now held in the Hampton Public Library's historical collection. A rare and pristine image depicting the surprisingly diverse student body of an important historically Black university in the early 20th century. Carl S. Matthews, "Hampton Institute" in THE ENCYCLOPEDIA OF SOUTHERN HISTORY (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1979).

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM57214

  • 4pp. including illustration. 16mo. Single folded sheet printed in purple. Front page somewhat rubbed and soiled, a few small creases, otherwise quite clean. Very good. A scarce promotional pamphlet encouraging students to attend Mary Hardin-Baylor College, which began as the women's division of Baylor in 1845. When the Baylor College for Women was brought to the edge of ruin by the Great Depression, a donation from Mary and John G. Hardin saved it and gave the school its new name. At the time of this pamphlet, the school was still an all-girls' school, and the oldest four-year college for women in the southwest. The text extols the college's virtues and modernity while only lightly touching on its religious affiliation and ends with the address of university president Gordon G. Singleton, who held that position from 1937 until 1952. Mary Hardin- Baylor became fully coeducational in 1971 and became a university with its first graduate program in 1978. No copies recorded individually on OCLC.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM57174

  • Broadside, 24 x 19 inches. Minor chipping and small closed tears to edges, otherwise in excellent condition. Very good plus. A scarce campaign broadside seeking to undermine 1884 Republican presidential nominee James G. Blaine's support among Irish- American voters by printing critical excerpts from THE IRISH WORLD, one of the most prominent Irish-American newspapers of the day. Blaine was a monumental figure in the early Republican party, serving as a representative from Maine for thirteen years, Speaker of the House for six, Senator for five, and Secretary of State on two separate occasions under three different administrations. He is perhaps best known as a talented orator, specifically for his eulogy of President Garfield - with whom he was conversing at the very moment of the latter's assassination. Blaine sought the Republican nomination unsuccessfully twice before securing it in 1884, running against Democratic candidate Grover Cleveland. As an Irish-American himself with a strong record of opposition to Britain in foreign policy, Blaine expected to secure a major portion of the Irish-American vote despite the fact that their polling history tended to favor Democrats. The excerpts printed in this broadside attempt to combat this on both fronts, focusing on a series of incidents during Blaine's first term as Secretary of State. Two of the excerpts deal with the story of Daniel McSweeny, a naturalized American citizen living in Ireland who was jailed by the British without evident cause, most likely for his affiliation with the Land League. Despite the fact that these excerpts are taken from THE IRISH WORLD, by 1884 the paper had changed its tune and fully endorsed Blaine in the upcoming election. This broadside aims to further impugn the Republican candidate's support by highlighting these inconsistencies side-by- side in a section labeled "A Striking Contrast! THE IRISH WORLD Then and Now." THE IRISH WORLD AND AMERICAN INDUSTRIAL LIBERATOR was published by Patrick Ford in New York City. Prior to beginning his own paper, Ford worked as a printer's apprentice for William Lloyd Garrison's abolitionist LIBERATOR and was an editor for a short-lived Black newspaper, the SOUTH CAROLINA LEADER, immediately after the Civil War. As publisher of THE IRISH WORLD he continued his activism and collected considerable donations to support the Land League in Ireland, a fact that likely elicited many of the harsh articles quoted in this broadside. OCLC records this document cataloged individually only at the Boston Athenaeum, Massachusetts Historical Society, Peabody Essex Museum, and Williams College. A scarce and interesting campaign broadside focusing on the Irish- American population during an often overlooked period in the country's political history. OCLC 262551823.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM57220

  • Seller image for RIVERSIDE HOUSE & COTTAGES, SANTA CRUZ [caption title] for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

    California]

    Published by Chas W. Saalburg, Lith., San Francisco, 1880

    Seller: William Reese Company - Americana, New Haven, CT, U.S.A.
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    Central lithographic image measuring 7 3/4 x 17 inches, surrounded by advertisements, the whole sheet measuring 13 1/2 x 22 inches. Lightly tanned, slight wear at the corners. Very good plus. A rare bird's-eye view of Santa Cruz, California, dominated by the grounds and buildings of the Riverside House and Cottages. The view serves as a fine advertisement for the hotel, which was operated by Frederick Barson and which promised that it was "first-class in every particular. Terms moderate.Open year round by the day or month. Free carriages to the House from all Trains and Steamers." The hotel appears to have been quite luxurious, and the view shows its main building, cottages, landscaped grounds, and the "club house." Groups of men and women stroll the grounds, and other groups are shown playing croquet and badminton. In the background is the unfolding Pacific Ocean, which could be accessed from the hotel grounds by taking a bridge across the San Lorenzo River. A number of advertisements for local businesses frame the view. Included are ads for M. Zaro's Garden City Restaurant and Bakery ("Private entrance for ladies and families"), Fontenay Vineyard, the Neptune Baths and the Dolphin Bathing Establishment (both of which specialized in "surf bathing"), Chesnutwood's Business College (which educated young men and young ladies), as well as photographers, shoemakers, druggists, and banks. No information on the Saalburg lithographic firm is given in Peters' CALIFORNIA ON STONE. Not in Reps' VIEWS AND VIEWMAKERS OF URBAN AMERICA. OCLC locates only two copies of this view, at Yale and the Clements Library. Rare and very attractive. OCLC 62186247, 1250662366.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM57307

  • Seller image for CHINESE TIMES. [Chinese title:] JINSHAN SHI BAO for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

    Chinese-American Newspaper]

    Published by The Chinese Times Publishing Company, San Francisco, 1964

    Seller: William Reese Company - Americana, New Haven, CT, U.S.A.
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    Approximately 310 issues, each issue [12]pp. Illustrations. Bound into thirteen volumes (one volume per month). Large folio. Blue and cream-colored wrappers, backed in brown paper with spine label printed in Chinese. Some soiling and creasing to wrappers, various degrees of chipping to spines. Issues near front of each volume a bit tanned, occasional small closed tears to lower margin. Large hole in October 21 issue where an article was apparently removed; vertical tear into text page increasing over last two issues of November volume; issues of December 8, 23, and 29 lacking and replaced by November 8, 22, and 29 respectively. Contemporary flyers for "Miss Chinatown U.S.A. 1964" laid in to February volume. In general very clean internally, and overall in very good condition, with the exception of only a handful of issues. A very nearly unbroken run of this important daily Chinese-American newspaper, covering the period from June 1963 through the end of June 1964, chronicling the events of a tempestuous year including the Civil Rights movement, the assassination of President Kennedy, the Brazilian coup, and more in addition to extensive coverage of news local to San Francisco's Chinese American community. Self-described as "The only Chinese Daily Owned, Edited, and Published by Citizens of the United States" and at one point the largest circulation Chinese newspaper in the country, the CHINESE TIMES was founded by Walter U. Lum in 1924. Lum was founder of the Chinese American Citizens Alliance (CACA) and began the CHINESE TIMES as the official voice of the organization. Lum and the CACA fought tirelessly for civil rights for Chinese Americans, particularly against the Exclusion Act, partially through use of this newspaper. "The success of the CHINESE TIMES had much to do with the paper's devotion to community issues. It was a leading advocate of immigration reform and civil rights for Chinese Americans for several decades, and it is the only nonparty-affiliated Chinese American newspaper that survived the Great Depression, World War II, and the cold war" (Zhao, p. 106). Walter Lum's daughter, Emma Ping Lum, went on to become the first Chinese- American female lawyer to practice in the United States, and to practice before the U.S. Supreme Court. There is a street named after him, Walter U. Lum Place, in San Francisco's Chinatown. The content of the paper is a combination of national and local news. In addition to the major stories of the time, including the March on Washington, JKF's assassination, and Oswald's murder among many others, the daily paper is filled with articles and photographs depicting local events such as beauty pageants, weddings, theatre performances, visiting politicians and religious figures, elections, and more. On occasion these stories align; such was the case with the considerable coverage dedicated to the Civil Rights protests which took place at the Sheraton Place Hotel in San Francisco in March 1964, where over a thousand demonstrators picketed to protest their discriminatory hiring practices. Their overnight sit-in was a success of sorts - in return for the cessation of the picket, a coalition of San Francisco hotels agreed to modify their practices. The present run contains every issue for the entire year with the exception of three days in December 1963, where they have been replaced by duplicates of the equivalent numbered issues from November. Collections of the CHINESE TIMES are scarce, and issues from the 1960s in particular have rarely been preserved. This is a remarkably long, nearly- continuous, well-preserved run of one of the most important Chinese-American newspapers of the 20th century, encompassing a particularly turbulent period in the country's history and the history of Civil Rights. Xiaojian Zhao, REMAKING CHINESE AMERICA: IMMIGRATION, FAMILY, AND COMMUNITY, 1940-1945 (New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 2002). "Walter U. Lum: Chinese American Pioneer and Civil Rights Leader" in EAST/WEST, February 27, 1985. OCLC 666483608, 10125576.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM57250

  • Seller image for THE CITY OF HOUSTON: A PROGRESSIVE CITY OF 35,000 PEOPLE LOCATED ON TIDE WATER.THE CITY OF HOUSTON: A RECOGNIZED COTTON MARKET. [with, on verso:] [TWO MANUSCRIPT DISBURSEMENTS FOR THE CITY OF HOUSTON, SIGNED BY MAYOR DANIEL C. SMITH, ON LETTERHEAD STATIONERY OF THE CITY SECRETARY AND TREASURER] for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

    Two sheets taped together to create one full piece of stationery, 8 1/2 x 11 inches. Lightly tanned and soiled, slight chipping and splitting along folds. Good. An interesting and rare piece of early Houston promotional material assembled from two official disbursements signed by Mayor Daniel C. Smith. The disbursements are small payments from the City of Houston to local individuals for services rendered (e.g. "putting ropes in pole on market corner"). Each note is brief and only written on half of a sheet of stationery, which have been neatly taped together at the center to create one full sheet of the city Secretary and Treasurer's stationery. The text of the promotional material on the other side describes the city's location, "inducements to the home seeker," and advantages for the businessman and family man: "a city full of children whose blooming cheeks, vigorous motion and robust health excite the surprise and admiration of visitors, and attest to the salubrity of the climate." Houston is touted as "the leading railroad centre of Texas," and its strength as a market for lumber, sugar, and cotton is briefly described. The upper half contains a map of Houston showing its relation to Galveston Bay and the many railroads which pass through it. A map on the lower half shows the relation of Houston to the Gulf of Mexico, the West Indies, and the Caribbean, and the attendant advantages for trade. It was printed by A.C. Gray, a Houston printer who produced numerous materials for and about the city in the mid to late 1800s, including the HOUSTON DAILY TELEGRAPH. Two examples of this stationery are recorded by OCLC, although each with a different letterhead, at the University of Texas at Austin and Southern Methodist University. A rare and interesting piece of Houston promotional ephemera, with manuscript records of the city's daily operations in the late 19th century. OCLC 12230171.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM57188

  • Seller image for GLIMPSES OF GOTHAM AND CITY CHARACTERS for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

    MacKeever, Sam A.: [Fox, Richard K., editor]

    Published by National Police Gazette Office, New York, 1880

    Seller: William Reese Company - Americana, New Haven, CT, U.S.A.
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    72pp., plus thirteen plates and two leaves of illustrated advertisements. Original printed pictorial wrappers. Wrappers soiled, corners worn, lacking upper and lower two inches of spine paper. Tanned, scattered light foxing, small closed marginal tears to a handful of pages. Contemporary ownership inscription on front free endpaper, repeated on page 20 (see below). Good plus. Third edition (published the same year as the first and second) of a highly popular collection of sensational columns written by MacKeever for THE NATIONAL POLICE GAZETTE, "with new and spicy illustrations" particular to this edition. The POLICE GAZETTE was founded in 1845 as a magazine about crime and criminals for a general audience, although it evolved dramatically when Richard K. Fox became editor and owner in 1877. Under Fox's tenure, the GAZETTE shifted focus to the lewd and the sensational, becoming one of the first tabloid newspapers and the forerunner to men's lifestyle, sports weeklies, and pin- up magazines such as ESQUIRE, SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, and PLAYBOY. Barely steering clear of obscenity laws for decades, the publication would eventually be banned by the U.S. Post Office in 1942 due to its "obscene and lewd" illustrations. This collection of columns from the first few years of Fox's tenure focuses on the night life and underbelly of New York City in the 1870s. The articles are by Sam MacKeever, described on the titlepage as the "American Charles Dickens." In the articles in the section entitled "Glimpses of Gotham," MacKeever muses on the scenes and people one encounters in the city, lampooning personal ads in the paper, satirizing the average opening-night theatergoing experience, detailing murders and illegal gambling rings, and more. Throughout, MacKeever's writing is steeped in the humor and satirical edge that still characterizes much sensational journalism. Concluding one column on illegal gambling, he writes: "The game in Courtland street was knocked among the sky-scraping kites by a young man losing all he had, even to his head, and then blowing his brains out. The proprietor of the hotel thought it was a strange transaction on the part of the young man. I fail to see anything strange in it. If you have lost your head, what good are the brains? Now, to have a head and no brains is quite a different affair. Plenty of men whom we all know are in that predicament, and experience not the slightest annoyance." MacKeever's "City Characters" columns, on the other hand, tend to tell the tales of individuals, including more than a few nefarious women who use their charms to swindle their unsuspecting marks. The publication is illustrated throughout with the "spicy illustrations" which made the POLICE GAZETTE so popular in the late 19th century. This copy contains the contemporary inscription of "Fred H. Savory, B.L.V.C.R.R. Boston Mass." Savory was born in Warner, New Hampshire in 1859, placing him squarely in the GAZETTE's demographic in the year 1880. At that time, he was employed in the freight department of the Boston & Lowell Railroad (i.e. the B.L.R.R. from his inscription), later returning to Warner and operating a variety of businesses throughout the 1880s and 90s. Not only was Savory of an age-group targeted by the POLICE GAZETTE, his employment by the railroad also shows the popularity of the genre among rail passengers.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM57227

  • Seller image for TRAVELS THROUGH THE INTERIOR PARTS OF AMERICA. IN A SERIES OF LETTERS. By an Officer for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

    Anburey, Thomas]

    Published by Printed for William Lane, London, 1789

    Seller: William Reese Company - Americana, New Haven, CT, U.S.A.
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    Two volumes. [4],vii,[21],467; [4],558pp., plus partially handcolored folding map and eight plates (five folding). Half titles. Modern half mottled calf and contemporary paper boards, spine gilt with raised bands, gilt red morocco label. Boards rubbed and shelf worn, corners bumped, spines a bit sunned. Archival repair to closed tears on bottom edge of first volume pages 105-06, 403-04 (no text affected), closed tear to top edge of second volume pages 261-62. Two folding plates with closed tears at tabs and small closed tears at fold (no loss of text). Occasional light foxing to text and plates, a few spots of soiling, light even tanning to a few gatherings. Bookplates to front pastedown of each volume (each with library deaccession stamps), early French booksellers' tickets to rear pastedowns of each volume (see below). Very good. Thomas Anburey served as an officer with Burgoyne; here, in a series of letters, he describes the disastrous campaign, his captivity by the Americans, and the march of British troops to detention in Charlottesville, Virginia. While some of the general descriptions are taken from other writers, Anburey's account is a fascinating narrative by an observant British officer during the Revolution. The engravings, some of them quite large when unfolded, are based on expert drawings by the author, and show scenes in Canada and New York during the Burgoyne campaign (including a rather gruesome image of an "Indian Warrior Entering his Wigwam with a Scalp"), and in Virginia. This set includes the plates with facsimiles of American currency following p.400 in volume two, which are often absent. These plates are often folding, but in this copy were separated during rebinding. Deaccessioned from the Harvard College Library, this copy was originally a gift of Massachusetts politician Samuel A. Eliot (1798-1862) in 1823. Eliot may well have acquired the set from Chez Parsons, Galignani et Co. (their booksellers' ticket is on the rear pastedown of both volumes) in Paris, during his European tour after graduating from Harvard Divinity School in 1820. HOWES A226, "aa." CLARK I:192. SABIN 1366. REESE, REVOLUTIONARY HUNDRED 88.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM57301

  • Seller image for MEMORIAL. TO THE LEGISLATURE OF MASSACHUSETTS [caption title] for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

    Dix, Dorothea]

    Published by Printed by Munroe & Francis, [Boston, 1843

    Seller: William Reese Company - Americana, New Haven, CT, U.S.A.
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    32pp. Half title. Gathered signatures, stitched as issued. Contemporary inscription on half title (see below). Modest foxing, outer leaves a bit tanned. Very good. In a cloth chemise and half morocco and cloth slipcase, spine gilt. The second edition (identical in text to the first edition of the same year, save for an editor's note and a prefatory note from the author) of Dorothea Dix's first published work, inspired by her discovery of the abhorrent conditions suffered by the mentally ill, and particularly women. This copy bears an inscription on the half title in Dorothea Dix's hand, "Revd J.T.G. Nichols." Rev. John Taylor Gilman Nichols (1817-1900) was a Harvard Divinity School graduate and a Unitarian pastor in Saco, Maine for several decades. In an 1887 letter to the Rev. James Freeman Clarke (reprinted in Clarke's collection of sermons, THE DISCIPLES' PULPIT, October, 1887, p.5), Nichols describes meeting Dix while he was still a divinity student, and contends that he helped start Dix on her career toward helping the mentally ill. Nichols' letter is worth quoting in full: "The facts are these, which, though of themselves trivial, are of historic as well as of personal interest: In the distribution of labor among the theological students at the Divinity School in Cambridge, all the women in the East Cambridge House of Correction (twenty in number) were assigned to me. On first meeting with them, I saw that they required not a young man, but a wise and experienced woman for their Sunday- school teacher. I asked my mother if she knew of any one who could tell me of such a woman. She referred me to Miss Dix. After a few moments' thought, Miss Dix said that she would take charge of them herself. I protested in vain that her delicate health would render the task too great. She rejoined, 'At all events, I will be there next Sunday.' She went; and after an hour in the Sunday-school, she crossed the yard to the jail, where she found a few insane persons confined in rooms where there was no provision for keeping them warm. She applied to the jailer, who told her that they did not need it, and that it would be unsafe. She then applied in person to the court, which was sitting at East Cambridge, and at length obtained what she desired. After this, she spent an hour every Sunday morning in the Sunday-school; and we left her in the jail. Miss Dix often came to my father's house in Portland, and many are the blessings she left behind and distributed among us." Dix first became interested in the care of the mentally ill while residing in England in the 1830s. In the early 1840s she began actively advocating on their behalf, lobbying legislatures to address the deplorable condition of asylums in the United States. Her first such effort was with the Massachusetts legislature, represented by the present pamphlet. Her findings over the previous two years at several asylums are described, and she pleads eloquently and forcefully for the legislators to do something to address the situation: "I come to place before the Legislature.the condition of the miserable, the desolate, the outcast. I come as the advocate of the helpless, forgotten,.men and women of beings sunk to a condition from which the most unconcerned would start with real horror; of beings wretched in prison, and more wretched in our almshouses." "Dix's petition [to the Massachusetts legislature] was approved and a bill was passed that soon provided needed funds for the mentally ill at the Worcester State Hospital.Her efforts paved the way for improved treatment of the mentally ill as well as the creation of more than 120 new mental health facilities.Her distinguished career as an advocate for reform has earned her an important place in history as well as the respect of people around the world" - ANB. This second edition is identical to the first except for a brief editor's note stating that it has been produced "in consequence of the continued demand for copies.by philanthropic persons in various parts of the country." A statement from Dix on the second page of this edition reaffirms her convictions: "In reply to an often proposed question - whether similar cases of suffering as are recorded in the following pages, can be found in other States besides Massachusetts? - truth and justice oblige me to answer that I believe they exist in all the States of the Union." As with the first edition, it seems that copies of this second edition were given to Dix for private distribution, as in this case. American Imprints lists only one entry for this title, presumably for the first edition. A presentation copy of a landmark work, with a significant provenance. SABIN 20337. AMERICAN IMPRINTS 43-1576. ANB 6, pp.635-37.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM57193

  • Seller image for THE STRUGGLES OF 1876 HOW SOUTH CAROLINA WAS DELIVERED FROM CARPET-BAG AND NEGRO RULE. SPEECH AT THE RED-SHIRT RE-UNION AT ANDERSON [wrapper title] for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

    Tillman, Benjamin R.

    Published by [N.p., but likely Charleston, 1909

    Seller: William Reese Company - Americana, New Haven, CT, U.S.A.
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    US$ 1,500.00

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    67pp. Original printed red wrappers. Spine chipping. Dampstain throughout lower margin. Good plus. A shocking speech by "Pitchfork" Ben Tillman, one of American history's most unabashedly hateful and violent politicians. Delivered at a 1909 reunion of the militant white- supremacist Red Shirt groups, Tillman's speech proudly lays out in clear and plain detail exactly how he was involved in and responsible for voter intimidation, election fraud, outright murder, and more in the course of the 1876 South Carolina election. Tillman became Governor himself in 1890 and assembled a stacked constitutional convention in 1895, with "the sole cause" of disenfranchising blacks. He spoke on the topic in the Senate in 1900: "In my State there were 135,000 negro voters.,and some 90,000 or 95,000 white voters.Now, I want to ask you, with a free vote and a fair count, how are you going to beat 135,000 by 95,000?.[W]e had a constitutional convention convened which took the matter up calmly, deliberately, and avowedly with the purpose of disfranchising [sic] as many of them as we could under the fourteenth and fifteenth amendments." In the present speech, Tillman, who served in the U.S. Senate from 1895 to 1918, recollects with glee how he helped to "provoke a riot and teach the Negroes a lesson" by "killing as many of them as was justifiable," stealing the election of 1876 and setting civil rights in South Carolina and the country at large back by decades. A highly scarce, if equally disturbing, first- hand account of one of South Carolina's most tumultuous periods from one of its most influential and notorious politicians. Quite uncommon in the market, we can find only one copy at auction.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM57273

  • Seller image for CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS FOR BRANCHES OF THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF COLORED PEOPLE [wrapper title] for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

    National Association for the Advancement of Colored People]: [African Americana]

    Published by New York, 1946

    Seller: William Reese Company - Americana, New Haven, CT, U.S.A.
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    21pp. 16mo. Original printed wrappers, stapled. Light dampstaining to wrappers and fore margin of first few leaves. Contemporary ownership inscription on front wrapper. Very good. After the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) was founded in 1909 to combat injustice against Black Americans, its first constitution was drafted in 1911 by Albert Pillsbury, a Massachusetts politician who was deeply involved in the advancement of civil rights. The NAACP and its goals grew over time, and the constitution was frequently updated to account for organizational changes. This 1946 constitution describes the duties of the officers and committees of the NAACP, gives information on dues, membership, meetings, the youth councils and woman's auxiliary, and also discusses the suspension and revocation of branch charters. This copy belonged to Rev. Clayton Lee Brooks of Los Angeles, most likely a member of that branch, which was founded in 1914. All editions of the CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS FOR BRANCHES. are extremely scarce, with none recorded in more than four copies; we find no examples of this 1946 edition anywhere.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM57283

  • Seller image for DESCRIPTION OF WANOTAN AND ANTELOPE LAKE RANCHES DAKOTA TERRITORY U.S.A. for sale by William Reese Company - Americana

    Dakota Territory]

    Published by George H. Buchanan and Co., [Philadelphia, 1889

    Seller: William Reese Company - Americana, New Haven, CT, U.S.A.
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    US$ 1,000.00

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    26pp. plus three maps (one folding). Original printed tan wrappers, stab sewn as issued. Small chip in outer edge of front wrapper, light wear, soiling, and tanning to wrappers. Internally quite clean. Very good. A rare promotional pamphlet advertising large areas of ranch and farm land in Cass County (near Fargo) and Church County (north-central North Dakota), including buildings, livestock, and machinery on both ranches. The seller was likely William Hinckle Smith (1861-1943), a wealthy Philadelphia investor and land speculator (and son of Joseph Frailey Smith, who was a director of the Northern Pacific Railroad), who was looking to sell before North Dakota statehood became official later the same year. The Wanotan Ranch, described here as the "home ranch" and documented with three maps of the property, was a large ranch (3,920 acres) located in the Red River Valley, where the "soil requires no fertilizer, the climate obviates any need of irrigation, [and] there are no trees or stones to be cleared from the land." Perhaps even more important, Wanotan was close to the Northern Pacific Railroad and the Minneapolis & Manitoba Railroad, allowing for the large-scale production of commodity crops, particularly wheat. The Antelope Lake Ranch is notably smaller (480 acres) and the land there is "not adapted to farming," however it is "one of the finest stock regions in the Territory.here stock can roam over many thousands of acres of Government land, and find an unlimited quantity of the most nutritious grasses." The "improvements" to the ranches were substantial. At Wanotan, there were thirty- two structures, including four barns, three houses and a boarding house, numerous box stalls, and other specialized structures for chickens, hogs, etc. Though smaller, Antelope Lake still had three barns and several other structures. The pamphlet includes careful valuation of the property, structures, and equipment, as well as the livestock at both locations, along with projections for future earning potential. The author strongly recommends acquiring both ranches together, since "in the business of growing wheat and breeding horses, there is, of course, a possibility, but very little probability that misfortunes would overtake both branches in any one year." Also included are detailed accounts of the climate and soil, and the financial performance of other agricultural products in the region. OCLC lists only two copies of this pamphlet, at Yale and the Minnesota Historical Society. Undoubtedly printed in a small number, and rare. OCLC 78478564. William Hinckle Smith Collection, RH MS P921, Kenneth Spencer Research Library, University of Kansas Libraries.

    Seller Inventory # WRCAM57224