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  • Wendy Scarfe

    Published by Wakefield Press, Kent Town, 2019

    ISBN 10: 1743056842ISBN 13: 9781743056844

    Seller: Grand Eagle Retail, Wilmington, DE, U.S.A.
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    Paperback. Condition: new. Paperback. A Mouthful of Petals is a nonfiction account of three years working in an Indian village in the early 1960s. Previously published, it became a minor classic among good samaritans, particularly in Britain, and was reviewed by The Times, New Statesman and such like. At the invitation of India's venerated political leader and activist Jayaprakash Narayan, Wendy and Allan Scarfe, two dedicated but far from solemn young Australian teachers, travelled to the remote village of Sokhodeora in Bihar in 1960. They had been asked to take charge of the educational activities of his ashram, but over the three years they lived there, their activities extended far beyond that. This humane and important book recounts their efforts in helping local people counter the misery, poverty and ignorance that afflicted so much of the region. By the time they left, the Scarfes had succeeded in teaching both children and adults much that would help them to lead better and fuller lives. And they left behind, for the young at least, something to hope and work for. This new edition of A Mouthful Of Petals includes an account of Wendy Scarfe's return trip to Sokhodeora during a famine in the late 1960s, and how those who live in Bihar state fare in the early twenty-first century. At the invitation of India's venerated political leader and activist Jayaprakash Narayan, the Scarfes, 2 young Australian teachers, travelled to the remote village of Sokhodeora in 1960. They had been asked to take charge of the educational activities of his ashram, but over the 3 years they lived there, their activities extended far beyond that. Shipping may be from multiple locations in the US or from the UK, depending on stock availability.

  • Wendy Scarfe

    Published by Wakefield Press, Kent Town, 2019

    ISBN 10: 1743056842ISBN 13: 9781743056844

    Seller: AussieBookSeller, Lidcombe, NSW, Australia
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    Seller Rating: 5-star rating

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    Paperback. Condition: new. Paperback. A Mouthful of Petals is a nonfiction account of three years working in an Indian village in the early 1960s. Previously published, it became a minor classic among good samaritans, particularly in Britain, and was reviewed by The Times, New Statesman and such like. At the invitation of India's venerated political leader and activist Jayaprakash Narayan, Wendy and Allan Scarfe, two dedicated but far from solemn young Australian teachers, travelled to the remote village of Sokhodeora in Bihar in 1960. They had been asked to take charge of the educational activities of his ashram, but over the three years they lived there, their activities extended far beyond that. This humane and important book recounts their efforts in helping local people counter the misery, poverty and ignorance that afflicted so much of the region. By the time they left, the Scarfes had succeeded in teaching both children and adults much that would help them to lead better and fuller lives. And they left behind, for the young at least, something to hope and work for. This new edition of A Mouthful Of Petals includes an account of Wendy Scarfe's return trip to Sokhodeora during a famine in the late 1960s, and how those who live in Bihar state fare in the early twenty-first century. At the invitation of India's venerated political leader and activist Jayaprakash Narayan, the Scarfes, 2 young Australian teachers, travelled to the remote village of Sokhodeora in 1960. They had been asked to take charge of the educational activities of his ashram, but over the 3 years they lived there, their activities extended far beyond that. Shipping may be from our Sydney, NSW warehouse or from our UK or US warehouse, depending on stock availability.

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    Taschenbuch. Condition: Neu. nach der Bestellung gedruckt Neuware -A Mouthful of Petals is a nonfiction account of three years working in an Indian village in 1960. Previously published, it became a minor classic among good samaritans, particularly in Britain, and was reviewed by The Times, New Statesman and such like. At the invitation of India's venerated political leader and activist Jayaprakash Narayan, Wendy and Allan Scarfe, two dedicated but far from solemn young Australian teachers, travelled to the remote village of Sokhodeora in Bihar in 1960. They had been asked to take charge of the educational activities of his ashram, but over the three years they lived there, their activities extended far beyond that. This humane and important book recounts their efforts in helping local people counter the misery, poverty and ignorance that afflicted so much of the region. By the time they left, the Scarfes had succeeded in teaching both children and adults much that would help them to lead better and fuller lives. And they left behind, for the young at least, something to hope and work for. This new edition of A Mouthful Of Petals includes an account of Wendy Scarfe's return trip to Sokhodeora during a famine in the late 1960s, and how those who live in Bihar state fare in the early twenty-first century. 294 pp. Englisch.

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    Condition: New. Dieser Artikel ist ein Print on Demand Artikel und wird nach Ihrer Bestellung fuer Sie gedruckt. KlappentextA Mouthful of Petals is a nonfiction account of three years working in an Indian village in 1960. Previously published, it became a minor classic among good samaritans, particularly in Britain, and was reviewed by The Times, N.