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  • Seller image for The Gentle Art of Making Enemies for sale by Between the Covers-Rare Books, Inc. ABAA

    WHISTLER, James A.M.

    Published by William Heinemann, London, 1890

    Seller: Between the Covers-Rare Books, Inc. ABAA, Gloucester City, NJ, U.S.A.
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    Association Member: ABAA ESA ILAB IOBA

    Seller Rating: 5-star rating

    First Edition Signed

    US$ 16,500.00

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    Hardcover. Condition: Near Fine. First English edition, and the first authorized edition, containing a letter from William Heinemann. One of only ten special copies. Near fine in slightly chipped, publisher's brown, gilt-decorated wrappers, bound into similarly decorated, near fine full brown morocco by Zaehnsdorf in 1925. Housed in a custom quarter-morocco slipcase with cloth chemise (the latter not shown in illustration). Inscribed by Whistler to his publisher: "William Heinemann - Publisher, Philosopher & Friend!- [author's butterfly signature] Chelsea. Oct. 1890." In the book Whistler details his libel suit against the critic John Ruskin, who in an 1877 published review of Whistler's painting *Nocturne in Black and Gold: The Falling Rocket* had written: "I have seen, and heard, much of Cockney impudence before now; but never expected to hear a coxcomb ask two hundred guineas for flinging a pot of paint in the public's face." (What would Ruskin have made of Jackson Pollock?) The lawsuit nearly ruined both parties - ultimately the artist was awarded a single farthing in damages and the court costs were split. Whistler had counted on many artists to stand witness at the trial but most declined, fearing the impact on their reputations. For the last several years of his life Heinemann's residence served as Whistler's home when he was in London. An extraordinary association.